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The Wall Street Journal Guide to the Top Business Schools 2003
     

The Wall Street Journal Guide to the Top Business Schools 2003

5.0 1
by Ronald J. Alsop (Editor), Harris Interactive, Wall Street Journal (Editor)
 
For years, prospective M.B.A. students seeking guidance on which business schools to consider have had to rely on rankings compiled with vague methodologies, subject to the biased opinions of students and school administrators. Now come The Wall Street Journal and Harris Interactive, the worldwide market-research firm, with their second annual survey that has become

Overview

For years, prospective M.B.A. students seeking guidance on which business schools to consider have had to rely on rankings compiled with vague methodologies, subject to the biased opinions of students and school administrators. Now come The Wall Street Journal and Harris Interactive, the worldwide market-research firm, with their second annual survey that has become the single most important reference tool for students, school administrators, and corporate recruiters. Using a carefully constructed methodology and Harris Interactive's online polling expertise, The Wall Street Journal Guide to the Top Business Schools 2003 shows students what corporate recruiters -- the "buyers" of budding management talent -- really think of the schools and their students.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Academic institutions have a love-hate relationship with published school rankings. On the one hand, school officials like the prestige that high rankings confer, arguably making them more attractive to prospective students. On the other hand, if their school is ranked too low, they dispute the methodology, dismissing the findings as irrelevant. The Wall Street Journal, in conjunction with Harris Interactive, has entered the fray with a handy guide to the top graduate business schools. Unlike other rankings that survey alumni, students, or the schools themselves, this compilation is based on surveys from recruiters, that is, the people who actually hire MBA graduates for jobs. Consequently, how recruiters regard the schools who are training prospective hires makes for a higher value-added ranking. There is also excellent content here on the MBA job market in general, good tips on how to apply effectively for admission, smart insights into schools that are attractive to women and minorities, and a lot of feedback from recruiters that is essential to anyone who might want to embark on an MBA graduate degree program. Dartmouth College's Tuck School of Business is the top-ranked school and is thoroughly profiled, as are the rest of the top 50, making this an extremely useful feature for MBA applicants. This annual has now appeared twice, and if it continues with the high level of research evidenced here, it will deservedly become the best overall business school ranking, making it a well-thumbed mainstay in libraries for years to come. Highly recommended for all libraries and especially vocational education collections.-Richard Drezen, Washington Post, New York City Bureau Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780743238236
Publisher:
Free Press
Publication date:
09/01/1902
Pages:
528
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 9.34(h) x 1.05(d)

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The Wall Street Journal Guide to the Top Business Schools 2003 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Excellent research backed with stimulating facts and figures about the schools that help to produce the future leaders in big business. Now let's just hope that they help to instill some moral conscience into them as well.