The War Body on Screen

Overview

The discussion of the war body on screen is best served by drawing upon multiple and diverging view points, differing academic backgrounds and methodological approaches. A multi-disciplinary approach is essential in order to capture and interpret the complexity of the war body on screen and its many manifestations.  In this collection, contributors utilize textual analysis, psychoanalysis, post-colonialism, comparative analysis, narrative theory, discourse analysis, representation and identity as ...

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Overview

The discussion of the war body on screen is best served by drawing upon multiple and diverging view points, differing academic backgrounds and methodological approaches. A multi-disciplinary approach is essential in order to capture and interpret the complexity of the war body on screen and its many manifestations.  In this collection, contributors utilize textual analysis, psychoanalysis, post-colonialism, comparative analysis, narrative theory, discourse analysis, representation and identity as their theoretical footprints. Analysis of the impact of new media and information technologies on the construction and transmission of war bodies is also been addressed.

The War Body on Screen has a highly original structure, with themed sections organized around ‘the body of the soldier'; ‘the body of the terrorist'; and ‘the body of the hostage'.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781441161857
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic
  • Publication date: 3/22/2012
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Karen Randell is a Principal Lecturer in Film at Southampton Solent University, UK where she is Programme Leader for Film and Television. She teaches contemporary cinema and film history and her research interests include: war genre, trauma, masculinity and early cinema. She is published on trauma in film in Art in the Age of Terrorism (London: Holberton Publication: 2005) and in SCREEN. She is co-editor (with Sean Redmond) of The War Body on Screen (Continuum, NY: 2008) and Screen Methods: Comparative Readings in Film Studies (Wallflower Press: 2005) with Jacqueline Furby.

Sean Redmond is Associate Professor at Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia. He is the author of The Culture of Blood, and editor of Liquid Metal: The Science Fiction Film Reader.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments     vii
Contributors     ix
Introduction: Setting the Screen   Karen Randell   Sean Redmond     1
The War Body on Screen     15
Introduction to Part One   Sean Redmond     17
When Planes Fall Out of the Sky: The War Body on Screen   Sean Remond     22
The War Body as Screen of Terror   Renuka Gusain     36
A King(dom) for a Stage: The War Body in and as Performance   Matthew Wagner     50
Baghdad ER: Subverting the Mythic Gaze upon the Wounded and the Dead   Linda Robertson     64
The Body of the Soldier     79
Introduction to Part Two   Karen Randell     81
They Came Back: War and Changing National Identity   Adele Parker     86
Bleeding Bodies and Post-Cold War Politics: Saving Private Ryan and the Gender of Vulnerability   Sarah Hagelin     102
"Welcome to Hell, Private Shakespeare": Trench Horror, Deathwatch, and the Resignification of World War I   Karen Randell     120
One National Invisible: Unveiling the Hidden War Body on Screen   H. Louise Davis   Jeffrey Johnson     134
The Body of the Terrorist     147
Introduction to Part Three   Sean Redmond     149
Constructing the Terrorist Subject: Michael Collins and The Terrorist as Models of Agonistic Pluralism   Jennie Carlsten     154
When the Script Runs Out,... What Happens to the Polarized War Body? Deconstructing Western 24/7 News Coverage of Operation Iraqi Freedom 2003-   Vian Bakir   Andrew McStay     165
Bodies on the Margins? African America and the War on Terror   Paul Williams     182
"Damn You For Making Me Do This": Abu Ghraib, 24, Torture, and Television Sadomasochism   Lindsay Coleman     199
The Body of the Hostage     215
Introduction to Part Four   Karen Randell     217
The Kidnapped Body and Precarious Life: Reflections on the Kenneth Bigley Case   Heather Nunn   Anita Biressi     222
The Body of the Woman Hostage: Spectacular Bodies and Berlusconi's Media   Rinella Cere     239
Hostage Videos in the War on Terror   Andrew Hill     251
Afterword
Joanna Bourke     266
Index     269
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