The War of the Worlds: Campfire Graphic Novel

The War of the Worlds: Campfire Graphic Novel

by H. G. Wells, Ryan Foley, Bhupendra Ahluwalia

London, England.
At the dawn of the twentieth century, the most significant event in human history has come to pass. Contact from an alien planet has been achieved. Rocket capsules fired from the surface of Mars have crashed into the southern
English countryside.
But what should be a moment of scientific curiosity and wonderful first contact between two


London, England.
At the dawn of the twentieth century, the most significant event in human history has come to pass. Contact from an alien planet has been achieved. Rocket capsules fired from the surface of Mars have crashed into the southern
English countryside.
But what should be a moment of scientific curiosity and wonderful first contact between two alien worlds turns instead into disaster. The annihilative weapons of the Martians leave no doubt whatsoever about the nature of the alien contact -an outright invasion of Earth.
In the midst of the chaos and devastation, one man makes a desperate attempt to save himself and make his way back to his family. Follow his account of the incredible events he encounters in Campfire's vivid adaptation of H G Wells's masterpiece, The War of the Worlds.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Wells's classic sf story has been retold frequently since its original publication in 1898. It has also been updated several times, from Orson Welles's panic-inducing 1938 radio broadcast to the 2005 film starring Tom Cruise. This adaptation maintains the original setting and time period as aliens from Mars invade 19th-century England. . . . Despite the prevalence of War versions available in various formats, graphic novels seem to be a rarity. The art here captures the mood well and lends an air of excitement to the narrative, whether depicting explosive moments of warfare or the tense stillness of the narrator hiding in abandoned buildings. The story is mature but not terribly graphic. Recommended for young adult readers, particularly those who claim to hate reading." — School Library Journal

“…a fantastic overview of this early sci-fi classic which delivers Wells' warning that mankind should not presume that because it enjoys a place at the top of the food chain, that it may not always be that way.”

John Tompkins, Sweet Union ‘Toonists

"I highly recommend Campfire’s comics. They do what they are intended to do and do it in  a way that excites kids about classic literature."

— Chris Wilson, The Graphic Classroom (a resource for teachers and librarians)
The Barnes & Noble Review
The War of the Worlds, H. G. Wells's 1898 classic -- the first and still the definitive alien invasion story -- has been described by editor extraordinaire James Gunn as "not simply a novel but the beginning of a genre."

What is at first believed to be falling stars or harmless meteorites turns out to be cylindrical Martian ships filled with nightmarish, tentacled invaders and their robotic war machines. When curious Englanders come to inspect the massive containers imbedded in the still-smoking countryside, metallic appendages emerge from the pits to kill every living thing in their path with strange heat rays. Then as the surrounding townships slowly devolve into chaos, the Martians begin constructing giant tripod war machines to track down and kill -- or capture -- as many of the human "inferior animals" as possible. The nameless narrator, trapped in a house almost completely crushed by the impact of a starship, watches in horror as the seemingly unstoppable Martians build their mechanical armies, kill hundreds with poisonous gas -- and begin snacking on captured humans!

Wells has been called the father of modern science fiction for good reason. Landmark works like The Time Machine, The Island of Dr. Moreau, The Invisible Man, and The War of the Worlds are just as compelling and wildly entertaining today as they were more than a century ago. Fans and historians of the science fiction genre who have yet to read Wells's classic tale of Martian invasion should definitely add this title to their reading lists. Paul Goat Allen

Product Details

Steerforth Press
Publication date:
Campfire Graphic Novels Series
Sales rank:
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 10.20(h) x 0.20(d)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Read an Excerpt

The War of the Worlds

By H. G. Wells Franklin Watts

Copyright © 2006 H. G. Wells
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780531169636

Chapter One

The Eve of the War

No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched keenly and closely by intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own; that as men busied themselves about their various concerns they were scrutinized and studied, perhaps almost as narrowly as a man with a microscope might scrutinize the transient creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water. With infinite complacency men went to and fro over this globe about their little affairs, serene in their assurance of their empire over matter. It is possible that the infusoria under the microscope do the same. No one gave a thought to the older worlds of space as sources of human danger, or thought of them only to dismiss the idea of life upon them as impossible or improbable. It is curious to recall some of the mental habits of those departed days. At most, terrestrial men fancied there might be other men upon Mars, perhaps inferior to themselves and ready to welcome a missionary enterprise. Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us. And early in the twentieth century came the greatdisillusionment.

The planet Mars, I scarcely need remind the reader, revolves about the sun at a mean distance of 140,000,000 miles, and the light and heat it receives from the sun is barely half of that received by this world. It must be, if the nebular hypothesis has any truth, older than our world; and long before this earth ceased to be molten, life upon its surface must have begun its course. The fact that it is scarcely one seventh of the volume of the earth must have accelerated its cooling to the temperature at which life could begin. It has air and water and all that is necessary for the support of animated existence.

Yet so vain is man and so blinded by his vanity, that no writer, up to the very end of the nineteenth century, expressed any idea that intelligent life might have developed there far, or indeed at all, beyond its earthly level. Nor was it generally understood that since Mars is older than our earth, with scarcely a quarter of the superficial area and remoter from the sun, it necessarily follows that it is not only more distant from life's beginning but nearer its end.

The secular cooling that must someday overtake our planet has already gone far indeed with our neighbor. Its physical condition is still largely a mystery, but we know now that even in its equatorial region the midday temperature barely approaches that of our coldest winter. Its air is much more attenuated than ours, its oceans have shrunk until they cover but a third of its surface, and as its slow seasons change huge snowcaps gather and melt about either pole and periodically inundate its temperate zones. That last stage of exhaustion, which to us is still incredibly remote, has become a present-day problem for the inhabitants of Mars. The immediate pressure of necessity has brightened their intellects, enlarged their powers, and hardened their hearts. And looking across space with instruments and intelligences such as we have scarcely dreamed of, they see, at its nearest distance only 35,000,000 of miles sunward of them, a morning star of hope, our own warmer planet, green with vegetation and gray with water, with a cloudy atmosphere eloquent of fertility, with glimpses through its drifting cloud wisps of broad stretches of populous country and narrow, navy-crowded seas.

And we men, the creatures who inhabit this earth, must be to them at least as alien and lowly as are the monkeys and lemurs to us. The intellectual side of man already admits that life is an incessant struggle for existence, and it would seem that this too is the belief of the minds upon Mars. Their world is far gone in its cooling and this world is still crowded with life, but crowded only with what they regard as inferior animals. To carry warfare sunward is, indeed, their only escape from the destruction that generation after generation creeps upon them.

And before we judge of them too harshly we must remember what ruthless and utter destruction our own species has wrought, not only upon animals, such as the vanished bison and the dodo, but upon its inferior races. The Tasmanians, in spite of their human likeness, were entirely swept out of existence in a war of extermination waged by European immigrants, in the space of fifty years. Are we such apostles of mercy as to complain if the Martians warred in the same spirit?

The Martians seem to have calculated their descent with amazing subtlety -- their mathematical learning is evidently far in excess of ours -- and to have carried out their preparations with a well-nigh perfect unanimity. Had our instruments permitted it, we might have seen the gathering trouble far back in the nineteenth century. Men like Schiaparelli watched the red planet -- it is odd, by-the-bye, that for countless centuries Mars has been the star of war -- but failed to interpret the fluctuating appearances of the markings they mapped so well. All that time the Martians must have been getting ready.

During the opposition of 1894 a great light was seen on the illuminated part of the disk, first at the Lick Observatory, then by Perrotin of Nice, and then by other observers. English readers heard of it first in the issue of Nature dated August 2. I am inclined to think that this blaze may have been the casting of the huge gun, in the vast pit sunk into their planet, from which their shots were fired at us. Peculiar markings, as yet unexplained, were seen near the site of that outbreak during the next two oppositions.


Excerpted from The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells Copyright © 2006 by H. G. Wells. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Considered one of the pioneers of science fiction, Herbert George Wells was born in England on 21st September 1866. At the age of eighteen, Wells joined the Normal School of Science in Kensington where he was taught by T H Huxley.
This was a crucial period of his life as it had an immense influence on his writing. He enjoyed writing stories and articles and gradually moved into writing on a full-time basis. In 1895, his first major novel, The Time Machine, was published.
H G Wells continued writing until his death at the age of seventy-nine in 1946.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
September 21, 1866
Date of Death:
August 13, 1946
Place of Birth:
Bromley, Kent, England
Place of Death:
London, England
Normal School of Science, London, England

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network


Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews