The Washington Manual of Outpatient Internal Medicine

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Overview

Geared to primary care practitioners, The Washington Manual® of Outpatient Internal Medicine focuses on common ambulatory medical problems encountered in each medical subspecialty. The book has a quick-reference format similar to The Washington Manual® of Medical Therapeutics, with a standard chapter template, a bulleted style, numerous tables and figures, and a two-color design. All chapters are written by house staff and faculty at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine.

Coverage includes the traditional internal medicine subspecialties and other areas where problems are frequently seen in the ambulatory setting, such as dermatology, neurology, ophthalmology, otolaryngology, and psychiatry. Most subspecialties have separate symptom- and disease-based chapters.

The Washington Manual® is a registered mark belonging to Washington University in St. Louis to which international legal protection applies. The mark is used in this publication by LWW under license from Washington University.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody Reviews
Reviewer: Vincent F Carr, DO, MSA, FACC, FACP (Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences)
Description: This is a new companion to one of the pillars of a house officer's life, The Washington Manual of Medical Therapeutics , 33rd edition, Foster et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010). Like its namesake, this book literally has everything internal medicine residents need to have at their fingertips when working in the outpatient medicine setting.
Purpose: The stated purpose is to provide a reference for the common ambulatory medical problems encountered in the outpatient office. Additionally, it is a tremendous reference for the subspecialty offices as it incorporates many of the details necessary for working in these offices.
Audience: Although focused on the needs of the medicine housestaff of Washington University/Barnes-Jewish Hospital, the book really is for all who practice outpatient medicine as general internal medicine specialists or subspecialists in medicine. While not stated as such, it is also a mine of information for family medicine physicians and physician assistants, as there is considerable overlap with the common problems they encounter in the primary care office..
Features: Very much like its predecessor, this is an easy-to-use, pocket-sized manual for house officers and continues its outstanding heritage of excellence. The format is somewhat different, changing to a bulleted list format and divided according to the usual organ systems. Each chapter has sections on the general principles of relevant anatomy and physiology, how to make the diagnosis, how to treat, and what follow-up is appropriate. There are simple figures and tables of relevant comparisons and a superb index.
Assessment: This is an excellent book for housestaff and attendings who practice in the outpatient setting. I highly recommend it to all. It is exceptionally easy to carry, use, and find information with minimal effort.
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Vincent F Carr, DO, MSA, FACC, FACP (Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences)
Description: This is a new companion to one of the pillars of a house officer's life, The Washington Manual of Medical Therapeutics, 33rd edition, Foster et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010). Like its namesake, this book literally has everything internal medicine residents need to have at their fingertips when working in the outpatient medicine setting.
Purpose: The stated purpose is to provide a reference for the common ambulatory medical problems encountered in the outpatient office. Additionally, it is a tremendous reference for the subspecialty offices as it incorporates many of the details necessary for working in these offices.
Audience: Although focused on the needs of the medicine housestaff of Washington University/Barnes-Jewish Hospital, the book really is for all who practice outpatient medicine as general internal medicine specialists or subspecialists in medicine. While not stated as such, it is also a mine of information for family medicine physicians and physician assistants, as there is considerable overlap with the common problems they encounter in the primary care office..
Features: Very much like its predecessor, this is an easy-to-use, pocket-sized manual for house officers and continues its outstanding heritage of excellence. The format is somewhat different, changing to a bulleted list format and divided according to the usual organ systems. Each chapter has sections on the general principles of relevant anatomy and physiology, how to make the diagnosis, how to treat, and what follow-up is appropriate. There are simple figures and tables of relevant comparisons and a superb index.
Assessment: This is an excellent book for housestaff and attendings who practice in the outpatient setting. I highly recommend it to all. It is exceptionally easy to carry, use, and find information with minimal effort.
From The Critics
Reviewer:This is an excellent book for housestaff and attendings who practice in the outpatient setting. I highly recommend it to all. It is exceptionally easy to carry, use, and find information with minimal effort.
Description:
Purpose:This is a new companion to one of the pillars of a house officer's life, The Washington Manual of Medical Therapeutics, 33rd edition, Foster et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010). Like its namesake, this book literally has everything internal medicine residents need to have at their fingertips when working in the outpatient medicine setting.
Audience:The stated purpose is to provide a reference for the common ambulatory medical problems encountered in the outpatient office. Additionally, it is a tremendous reference for the subspecialty offices as it incorporates many of the details necessary for working in these offices.
Features:Although focused on the needs of the medicine housestaff of Washington University/Barnes-Jewish Hospital, the book really is for all who practice outpatient medicine as general internal medicine specialists or subspecialists in medicine. While not stated as such, it is also a mine of information for family medicine physicians and physician assistants, as there is considerable overlap with the common problems they encounter in the primary care office..
Assessment:Very much like its predecessor, this is an easy-to-use, pocket-sized manual for house officers and continues its outstanding heritage of excellence. The format is somewhat different, changing to a bulleted list format and divided according to the usual organ systems. Each chapter has sections on the general principles of relevant anatomy and physiology, how to make the diagnosis, how to treat, and what follow-up is appropriate. There are simple figures and tables of relevant comparisons and a superb index.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Vincent F Carr, DO, MSA, FACC, FACP(Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences)
Description: This is a new companion to one of the pillars of a house officer's life, The Washington Manual of Medical Therapeutics, 33rd edition, Foster et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010). Like its namesake, this book literally has everything internal medicine residents need to have at their fingertips when working in the outpatient medicine setting.
Purpose: The stated purpose is to provide a reference for the common ambulatory medical problems encountered in the outpatient office. Additionally, it is a tremendous reference for the subspecialty offices as it incorporates many of the details necessary for working in these offices.
Audience: Although focused on the needs of the medicine housestaff of Washington University/Barnes-Jewish Hospital, the book really is for all who practice outpatient medicine as general internal medicine specialists or subspecialists in medicine. While not stated as such, it is also a mine of information for family medicine physicians and physician assistants, as there is considerable overlap with the common problems they encounter in the primary care office..
Features: Very much like its predecessor, this is an easy-to-use, pocket-sized manual for house officers and continues its outstanding heritage of excellence. The format is somewhat different, changing to a bulleted list format and divided according to the usual organ systems. Each chapter has sections on the general principles of relevant anatomy and physiology, how to make the diagnosis, how to treat, and what follow-up is appropriate. There are simple figures and tables of relevant comparisons and a superb index.
Assessment: This is an excellent book for housestaff and attendings who practice in the outpatient setting. I highly recommend it to all. It is exceptionally easy to carry, use, and find information with minimal effort.
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Product Details

Table of Contents

1: Approach to the Ambulatory Patient
Debaroti M. Borschel and Thomas M. De Fer

2: Care of the Surgical Patient
Meredith A. Brisco, Rashmi S. Mullur, and Thomas M. De Fer

3: Hypertension
Vinay Madan and Thomas M. De Fer

4: Ischemic Heart Disease
Joshua M. Stolker

5: Heart Failure and Cardiomyopathy
Joel D. Schilling and Michael W. Rich

6: Valvular Heart Disease
Benico Barzilai

7: Arrhythmia and Syncope
Scott B. Marrus and Timothy W. Smith

8: Dyslipidemia
Anne C. Goldberg and Katherine E. Henderson

9: Disorders of Hemostasis
Charles S. Eby

10: Venous Thromboembolism and Anticoagulation Therapy
Roger D. Yusen and Brian F. Gage

11: Common Pulmonary Complaints
Peter G. Tuteur

12: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Asthma
Warren Isakow

13: Interstitial Lung Diseases and Pulmonary Hypertension
Raksha Jain and Murali M. Chakinala

14: Sleep Disorders
Tonya D. Russell

15: Pleural Effusion and Solitary Pulmonary Nodule
Devin P. Sherman, Martin L. Mayse, and Thomas M. De Fer

16: Diabetes Mellitus
Rashmi S. Mullur and Ernesto Bernal-Mizrachi

17: Endocrine Diseases
William E. Clutter

18: Nutrition and Obesity
Mariko K. Johnson and Shelby A. Sullivan

19: Laboratory Assessment of Kidney and Urinary Tract Disorders
Ying Chen, Vikrant Rachakonda, and Michelle C.L. Cabellon

20: Acute Kidney Injury, Glomerulopathy, and Chronic Kidney Disease
Ying Chen, Vikrant Rachakonda, and Michelle C.L. Cabellon

21: Hematuria and Nephrolithiasis
Ying Chen, Jawad Munir, Vikrant Rachakonda, and Steven Cheng

22: General Infectious Disease
F. Matthew Kuhlmann and Thomas C. Bailey

23: Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Hilary E.L. Reno and E. Turner Overton

24: Common Gastrointestinal Complaints
Babac Vahabzadeh and Dayna S. Early

25: Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease
C. Prakash Gyawali

26: Hepatobiliary Diseases
Amanda Camp and Kevin M. Korenblat

27: Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Christina Ha and Matthew A. Ciorba

28: Rheumatologic Diseases
J. Chad Byrd and Richard D. Brasington

29: Musculoskeletal Complaints
Thomas M. De Fer

30: Hematologic Diseases
Reshma Rangwala and Morey A. Blinder

31: Care of the Cancer Patient
Maria Q. Baggstrom

32: Palliative Care and Hospice Medicine
Nadia Khoury and Maria C. Dans

33: Pain Management
Amy Sheldahl and Maria C. Dans

34: Geriatrics
Syed Khalid and David B. Carr

35: Allergy and Immunology
Jinny E. Chang and Shirley D. Joo

36: Otolaryngology
Thomas M. De Fer

37: Women's Health
Karen S. Winters and Kathryn M. Diemer

38: Men's Health
Melvin Blanchard

39: Dermatology
Ilana Rosman, Brendan Lloyd, and Omar Jassim

40: Psychiatry
Prateek C. Gandiga

41: Neurologic Disorders
Eric C. Klawiter, Brian Sommerville, Leo Wang, and Todd J. Schwedt

42: Ophthalmology
Stephen A. Kamenetzky, Michael D. Straiko, and Linda M. Tsai

43: Screening and Adult Immunizations
Megan E. Wren

44: Smoking Cessation
Megan E. Wren

45: Alcohol Abuse
Mohsen Nasir and Thomas M. De Fer

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