×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Way That I Am
     

The Way That I Am

by Martina McBride
 

See All Formats & Editions

While Martina McBride's blend of traditional country and progressive folk styles -- along with her powerful, remarkable voice -- got country audiences to sit up and take notice in 1992, it was The Way That I Am, and most notably its Gretchen Peters-penned single "Independence Day," that blew

Overview

While Martina McBride's blend of traditional country and progressive folk styles -- along with her powerful, remarkable voice -- got country audiences to sit up and take notice in 1992, it was The Way That I Am, and most notably its Gretchen Peters-penned single "Independence Day," that blew minds. While the song itself -- told from the point of view of a surviving daughter of an alcoholic wife-beater and an abused, long-suffering wife and mother -- ends in a tragedy of suicide and death, it is nonetheless a redemptive song that makes no moral judgments yet asks real questions about what "independence" actually means. Set on the Fourth of July, it pointedly asks, Does Independence Day mean independence for everyone or does it mean making the choice to free yourself from your bonds, no matter how horrific the consequences? Is it a choice made independent of society, morals, and cultural and religious mores because of the depth of one's convictions? McBride delivers the story with a tough, matter-of-fact, barely concealed rage, and yet that gives way to a transcendence in the refrain so stirring and shatteringly moving it was used in the aftermath of September 11th (even if it was taken out of context in the same way that Bruce Springsteen's "Born in the USA" was). It was an instant classic and remains one over a decade later. It's the kind of troubling song you cannot immediately -- or perhaps ever -- fathom. The listener is carried into the heart of the contradiction of a day of celebration and raw horror inside a tune so seductive and catchy it feels at odds with its lyric, yet comes together on the refrain only to split again into more fragments than can be counted. When McBride declares, "Now I ain't sayin' it's right or it's wrong/Maybe it's the only way/Talk about your revolution/It's independence day," the entire world inside the song comes apart, and you are left wondering who the right, wrong, and guilty are in the refrain, and you have to make out your own point of consideration regarding a "day of reckoning." There are no answers, just facts, questions, and ciphers. The single could have sold the album alone, but the other nine tracks here are quality as well. From the opener, "Heart Trouble," to "She Ain't Seen Nothing Yet," to the closer, "Ashes," the feel on the album, set by the completely modern country-pop sound of the single, is up-tempo, glossier, and more streamlined in its focus than her debut, but that's fine because McBride proves herself capable of delivering any kind of song in the end. There isn't a weak track in the bunch, and despite the more modern, less traditional sound, it makes little difference because McBride is a singer's singer: tough, true, and in full control of her gift.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/01/2004
Label:
Bmg Special Product
UPC:
0755174871023
catalogNumber:
148710

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Martina McBride   Primary Artist,Tambourine,Vocals,Background Vocals
Ashley Cleveland   Background Vocals
John Wesley Ryles   Background Vocals
Joe Chemay   Bass Guitar
Grace Bahng   Cello
Brett Beavers   Vocals,Background Vocals
Deryl Dodd   Vocals,Background Vocals
Dan Dugmore   Electric Guitar
Larry Franklin   Fiddle
Paul Franklin   Steel Guitar
Steve Franklin   Steel Guitar
John Garcia   Electric Guitar
Vicki Hampton   Background Vocals
Dann Huff   Electric Guitar
Bill Hullett   Acoustic Guitar
Mary Ann Kennedy   Background Vocals
Anthony Martin   Keyboards,Background Vocals
Brent Mason   Electric Guitar
Steve Nathan   Keyboards
Herb Pedersen   Background Vocals
Pamela Rose   Background Vocals
Mary Kathryn Van Osdale   Violin
Biff Watson   Acoustic Guitar
Charlie Whitten   Steel Guitar
Kristin Wilkinson   Viola
Lonnie Wilson   Drums
Paul Worley   Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar
Johnny Garcia   Electric Guitar
Dennis Wilson   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

Edgar Meyer   Arranger,String Arrangements
Martina McBride   Producer
Mike Poole   Engineer
Ed Seay   Producer,Engineer
Paul Worley   Producer
Mary Hamilton   Artwork,Art Direction
Ron Keith   Cover Photo
Clarke Schleicher   Engineer
Gary Harrison   Composer

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews