The Way We Never Were: American Families And The Nostalgia Trap

The Way We Never Were: American Families And The Nostalgia Trap

by Stephanie Coontz
     
 

This myth-shattering examination of two centuries of American family life banishes the misconceptions about the past that cloud current debate about "family values." "Leave It to Beaver" was not a documentary, Stephanie Coontz points out; neither the 1950s nor any other moment from our past presents workable models of how to conduct our personal lives today. Without… See more details below

Overview

This myth-shattering examination of two centuries of American family life banishes the misconceptions about the past that cloud current debate about "family values." "Leave It to Beaver" was not a documentary, Stephanie Coontz points out; neither the 1950s nor any other moment from our past presents workable models of how to conduct our personal lives today. Without minimizing the serious new problems in American families, Coontz warns that a consoling nostalgia for a largely mythical past of "traditional values" is a trap that can only cripple our capacity to solve today's problems. From "a man's home was his castle" to "traditional families never asked for a handout," this provocative book explodes cherished illusions about the past. Organized around a series of myths and half-truths that burden modern families, the book sheds new light on such contemporary concerns as parenting, privacy, love, the division of labor along gender lines, the black family, feminism, and sexual practice. Fascinating facts abound: In the nineteenth century, the age of sexual consent in some states was nine or ten, and alcoholism and drug abuse were more rampant than today . . . Teenage childbearing peaked in the fabulous family-oriented 1950s . . . Marriages in pioneer days lasted a shorter time than they do now. Placing current family dilemmas in the context of far-reaching economic, political, and demographic changes, The Way We Never Were shows that people have not suddenly and inexplicably "gone bad" and points to ways that we can help families do better. Seeing our own family pains as part of a larger social predicament means that we can stop the cycle of guilt or blame and face the real issues constructively, Coontz writes. The historical evidence reveals that families have always been in flux and often in crisis, and that families have been most successful wherever they have built meaningful networks beyond their own boundaries.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780465090976
Publisher:
Basic Books
Publication date:
10/06/1993
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
148,418
Product dimensions:
7.98(w) x 10.92(h) x 1.20(d)
Lexile:
1550L (what's this?)

Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction1
1The Way We Wish We Were: Defining the Family Crisis8
2"Leave It to Beaver" and "Ozzie and Harriet": American Families in the 1950s23
3"My Mother Was a Saint": Individualism, Gender Myths, and the Problem of Love42
4We Always Stood on Our Own Two Feet: Self-reliance and the American Family68
5Strong Families, the Foundation of a Virtuous Society: The Family and Civic Responsibility93
6A Man's Home Is His Castle: The Family and Outside Intervention122
7Bra-Burners and Family Bashers: Feminism, Working Women, Consumerism, and the Family149
8"First Comes Love, Then Comes Marriage, Then Comes Mary with a Baby Carriage": Marriage, Sex, and Reproduction180
9Toxic Parents, Supermoms, and Absent Fathers: Putting Parenting in Perspective207
10Pregnant Girls, Wilding Boys, Crack Babies, and the Underclass: The Myth of Black Family Collapse232
11The Crisis Reconsidered255
Epilogue: Inventing a New Tradition283
Notes289
Select Bibliography377
Index381

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