The Ways to Love a Man/Tammy's Touch

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Raven's 2006 two-fer combines the first two albums Tammy Wynette released after her 1969 Greatest Hits LP: 1969's The Ways to Love a Man and 1970's Tammy's Touch. Although neither of these are quite as iconic in their titles (and title songs) as Your Good Girl's Gonna Go Bad or D-I-V-O-R-C-E or Stand by Your Man, these are excellent records in their own right and can be seen as portraits of the queen at the peak of her reign. The Ways to Love a Man found her and producer Billy Sherrill at cruising altitude, delivering an album that easily replicated the sound and feel of Stand by Your Man. If anything, the album felt a bit too easy, as Sherrill began making his ...
See more details below
CD
$21.65
BN.com price
(Save 5%)$22.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (CD)
  • All (2) from $17.54   
  • New (2) from $17.54   

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Raven's 2006 two-fer combines the first two albums Tammy Wynette released after her 1969 Greatest Hits LP: 1969's The Ways to Love a Man and 1970's Tammy's Touch. Although neither of these are quite as iconic in their titles (and title songs) as Your Good Girl's Gonna Go Bad or D-I-V-O-R-C-E or Stand by Your Man, these are excellent records in their own right and can be seen as portraits of the queen at the peak of her reign. The Ways to Love a Man found her and producer Billy Sherrill at cruising altitude, delivering an album that easily replicated the sound and feel of Stand by Your Man. If anything, the album felt a bit too easy, as Sherrill began making his productions smoother and silkier, sanding away any of the lingering rough country edges that were on Stand by Your Man, giving Tammy's impeccably luxurious surroundings. It's an appropriate setting for the First Lady of Country Music even if it ironically feels a bit more pop than country, but the key to Sherrill's productions was how he made them so grand and then singers like Tammy or her husband George Jones grounded them. More than any of Sherrill's other vocalists, Tammy seemed to slide into the soft textures of his productions, and nowhere was that sound softer than it was on The Ways to Love a Man, where Tammy comfortably covered Johnny Mathis' "The Twelfth of Never." This may have been the only time on the record that she sang an old-fashioned crooner, yet the album retains a romantic mood, verging on being a countrypolitan make-out record (which is quite befitting for an LP called The Ways to Love a Man and whose biggest hit was the title track). This sustained mood is appealing, even seductive, but the album is just a shade less compelling overall than its immediate predecessor...but that is a pretty tough yardstick to judge any country album by, really. If The Ways to Love a Man had the hazy gauze of romance hanging over it, its 1970 successor Tammy's Touch returned the First Lady of Country to tales of heartbreak, and with this return to tales of woe, Billy Sherrill peppered his production with more prominent steel guitars, cascading pianos, and crisp acoustic guitars. It could hardly be called hard, bare-bones country -- Billy Sherrill always favored the operatic in his arrangements -- but compared to the enveloping softness of The Ways to Love a Man, Tammy's Touch felt a bit harder and firmer (ironically so, given the title), more like Stand by Your Man and D-I-V-O-R-C-E in its sound and attitude. Like those albums, Tammy's Touch also had a pair of major hits -- "He Loves Me All the Way" went to number one, while the opening "I'll See Him Through" went to number two -- but the bench on this album ran pretty deep, thanks to Sherrill's solicitation of songs written especially for Tammy. He wound up with songs that played on previous hits ("The Divorce Sale") or country classics ("He Thinks I Love Him" echoes the title of George Jones' immortal "She Thinks I Still Care"), songs that fit into a nicely balanced blend of broken-hearted weepers and bubbly pop, best typified by that hit "He Loves Me All the Way." That expert blend helps make Tammy's Touch one of her most satisfying albums of the '70s. Raven's two-fer also features four bonus tracks: both sides of the non-LP single "Run, Woman, Run" -- which went to number one in 1970 -- are here in the bonus tracks, as are the title track from the film "Run, Angel Run" and its B-side "Too Far Gone."
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 10/10/2006
  • Label: Raven [australia]
  • UPC: 612657023723
  • Catalog Number: 237
  • Sales rank: 67,681

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Tammy Wynette Primary Artist
Technical Credits
Tammy Wynette Composer
Carmol Taylor Composer
Jerry Chesnut Composer
Jerry Crutchfield Composer
Jerry Livingston Composer
T. Moore Composer
Glenn Sutton Composer
Paul Francis Webster Composer
Ben Wilson Composer
Norris Wilson Composer
A. Booth Composer
D.R. Goff Composer
B.C. Hendricks Composer
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously