The Wealth of Nations

The Wealth of Nations

4.1 27
by David Smith
     
 

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Are you struggling with understanding Adam Smith's the Wealth of Nations? Or do you lack the time to read all the details? With 100 Page Summaries, you get a professional grade summary with just enough depth to understand all the important themes, characters, and plots. Why pay a premium for other discount summary books when 100 Page Summaries has more quality and a

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Are you struggling with understanding Adam Smith's the Wealth of Nations? Or do you lack the time to read all the details? With 100 Page Summaries, you get a professional grade summary with just enough depth to understand all the important themes, characters, and plots. Why pay a premium for other discount summary books when 100 Page Summaries has more quality and a cheaper price. Not convinced? Take a look inside the book to see for yourself. This book offers an overall summary of the entire book in modern english so you can understand the original text.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781939370105
Publisher:
One Hundred Page Summaries
Publication date:
02/19/2014
Pages:
114
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.24(d)

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The Wealth of Nations 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
Uchtraeda More than 1 year ago
To sell an abridged edition without stating that is in fact abridged is, simply, fraud. I would like to read, and make up my own mind about as well as learn from, ALL of what Adam Smith wrote.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
ABRIDGED
Guest More than 1 year ago
Nobody seriously involved in economics can do without this exhaustive work, originally published in five volumes as An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. This classic is a pragmatic and accessible milestone in the history of economics. Its author, Adam Smith, is woven into every economics textbook. However, Smith¿s theories, which today often are recounted mostly in fragments, frequently incorrectly, reveal their entire social and economic innovative power only in context. Smith burst onto the scene at a time when absolutist national states monopolized the world's precious metal reserves and tried to increase their own wealth through stringent export policies. These states were motivated by an entirely new concept about national wealth: that it stemmed from the work of the country's people, not from gold. Based on that idea, economic markets should balance themselves as if guided by an 'invisible hand,' impelled by each individual's self-interest. The state has to provide only an orderly framework and specific public goods and services. Even though Smith's image of idealized economic and social harmony may have developed a few cracks over the course of time, his ideas have inspired many well-known economists during the past 250 years, including David Ricardo, Vilfredo Pareto, Friedrich August von Hayek and Milton Friedman. We highly recommend this seminal work.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Written by Adam Smith who was the founding father of capitalism. This book was the the historical book that changed the views of many people. This book is highly regarded in the economics community. I reccomend it for anyone who is interested in econ or capitalism. A must read for any thinkers.
DaedelusPrime More than 1 year ago
All you need to know.
reACTIONary More than 1 year ago
This is reprint's Edwin Cannan's extensively annotated 1904 scholarly edition. This is the edition reprinted by the University of Chicago Press in 1976 for the 200th anniversary of its original publication. You can be assured that this is the most widely accepted, standard academic edition. It does not contain Cannan's Introduction or Index. It does contain his Notes and Marginal Summary. Obviously it does not have the George J. Stigler's Preface from the UofC edition, but it contains an introduction by Robert Reich, commentary by R. H. Campbell and A. S. Skinner and a Modern Library "Reading Group Guide". Having looked over all of the edition's on the B&N site, I recommend this one as superior to the others, even if more expensive.
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RolfDobelli More than 1 year ago
getAbstract believes that no serious economist can do without this exhaustive work, originally published in five volumes as An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. This classic is a pragmatic and accessible milestone in the history of economics. Its author, Adam Smith, is woven into every economics textbook. However, Smith's theories, which today often are recounted mostly in fragments, frequently incorrectly, reveal their entire social and economic innovative power only in context. Smith burst onto the scene at a time when absolutist national states monopolized the world's precious metal reserves and tried to increase their own wealth through stringent export policies. These states were motivated by an entirely new concept about national wealth: that it stemmed from the work of the country's people, not from gold. Based on that idea, economic markets should balance themselves as if guided by an "invisible hand," impelled by each individual's self-interest. The state has to provide only an orderly framework and specific public goods and services. Even though Smith's image of idealized economic and social harmony may have developed a few cracks over the course of time, his ideas have inspired many well-known economists during the past 250 years, including David Ricardo, Vilfredo Pareto and Milton Friedman.
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Regent More than 1 year ago
Very Informative. Insights proved to be accurate over time. This book helped me to form better conclusions and analysis of cultures for one of my books.
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Extremely tedious, laborious reading with somewhat outdated vernacular, but a must-read for those interested in the history of economic theory.
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