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The Welcome Table: African American Heritage Cooking
     

The Welcome Table: African American Heritage Cooking

by Jessica B. Harris, Patrick Eck (Illustrator), Patrick Eck (Illustrator)
 

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This is the definitive book on African-American food and cooking traditions--by the celebrated African-American culinary historian and cookbook author. From grits with ham and red-eye gravy to creamy sweet potato pie to "a mess of greens," here is African-American food at its finest--in more than 200 recipes that reflect the richness and diversity of black culture.

Overview

This is the definitive book on African-American food and cooking traditions--by the celebrated African-American culinary historian and cookbook author. From grits with ham and red-eye gravy to creamy sweet potato pie to "a mess of greens," here is African-American food at its finest--in more than 200 recipes that reflect the richness and diversity of black culture. 400 pp.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Cookbook celebrating the history of African American cuisine.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780684818375
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Publication date:
12/04/1996
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
7.42(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.74(d)

Read an Excerpt

Kédjenou<

This is a traditional one-pot dish from the Ivory Coast. With the increasing popularity of Kwanzaa, the African-American year-end celebration, more and more of us are looking to the African motherland for holiday celebration dishes, and slow-cooked kédjenou is a perfect choice. The dish, which in the Côte d'Ivoire is prepared with everything from guinea hen to lobster, can be made with chicken. Traditionally cooked in a clay pot called a canari, which is sealed closed with a banana leaf, kédjenou can also be prepared in a dutch oven or any heavy flameproof casserole that can be tightly sealed. Serve the kédjenou with rice instead of the Ivoirian attiéké, a fermented starch.

Serves 4

1 (2 1/2- to 3-pound) chicken, cut into serving pieces
2 medium-sized onions, sliced
2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
1 clove garlic, minced
1 bay leaf
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Place all of the ingredients into a dutch oven or heavy flameproof casserole, cover tightly, and cook over medium to low heat for 40 minutes. Every 5 minutes or so, shake the casserole to mix the ingredients and make sure that they do not stick to the pot. Do not uncover the pot while cooking. When ready, uncover, discard the bay leaf, and serve with white rice.

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