The Well-Adjusted Child: The Social Benefits of Homeschooling

The Well-Adjusted Child: The Social Benefits of Homeschooling

by Rachel Gathercole
     
 

Socialization may well be the single most important aspect of education today. With high and rising rates of divorce, drug abuse, youth violence, alcoholism, teen promiscuity, and so forth, we cannot afford to let this issue go unexamined.To cling to the idea that what we, as a culture, are doing now is the right and best way for all children simply because it is

Overview

Socialization may well be the single most important aspect of education today. With high and rising rates of divorce, drug abuse, youth violence, alcoholism, teen promiscuity, and so forth, we cannot afford to let this issue go unexamined.To cling to the idea that what we, as a culture, are doing now is the right and best way for all children simply because it is what we are used to is to shut our eyes and minds to other possibilities-possibilities that may well afford greater happiness, success, peace, and safety to our own children.At a time when people feel more disconnected than ever before, we cannot afford to overlook or allow ourselves to be blinded to an option which offers great benefits, including a rich, fulfilling, and healthy social life, that our children may well need for the future. Homeschooling offers great social benefits to kids and parents. And when we understand them, our children are the ones who will win.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Gathercole, who has spent 10 years homeschooling her three children, says what most people wonder about is whether homeschooled children can work and play with others, in other words, their socialization skills. She begins by noting that "once upon a time, all children were homeschooled" before more formal schooling and the development of "school culture." She notes that conventional schools offer "socialization" through peer pressure, the stress of choosing between popularity and academic performance, and excessive attention to appearance. Drawing on her own experiences as a homeschooler, she details the networks of other homeschoolers who provide opportunities for their children—and themselves—to socialize. Gathercole also points to research showing that homeschooled children have stronger self-concepts than children attending conventional schools. . . . She explores concepts of socialization, the importance of friendships with other children, strong relationships with parents, and how homeschoolers eventually integrate into the "real world. . . ."

—-Vanessa Bush, Booklist, Sep 2007

"The book is broader in scope than simply socialization. By tackling such topics as what homeschoolers do, a definition of socialization, friends and peers, family relationships, safety and bullying, relationships with adults, diversity and minority socialization, citizenship and democracy, the teen years, and the homeschooling parent's social life, the author necessarily touches on many other positives of homeschooling."

—-Kathy Getzer, The Old Schoolhouse Magazine

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781600651076
Publisher:
WindRiver Publishing
Publication date:
07/25/2007
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.87(d)

Read an Excerpt

It seems intrinsically obvious that homeschoolers must be socially deprived. After all, while others are in school, they are not. While schoolchildren ride the bus, homeschoolers, in general, do not. While the conventionally schooled spend their days with large groups of peers, homeschoolers, it may seem, do not.

But research shows that homeschoolers are not socially deprived. Personal contact with any representative sample of homeschoolers will confirm this. And many experienced homeschoolers consider socialization one of the greatest advantages of homeschooling. Why the discrepancy? One reason is that homeschooling is not what people generally imagine it to be. It is not, as many imagine, essentially school transplanted into the home without the other kids. So just what is it instead? In this chapter we will dispense with common stereotypes and instead peer into the lives of some real homeschoolers to see what they really do with their time.

One definition of homeschooling is that it is simply the education or teaching of a child or children at home, usually by the parent or guardian. To some extent this is true, but for understanding what the life of a homeschooler is really like, this definition is wholly inadequate because in truth, Homeschooling is much more than that. It doesn't necessarily take place at home and often has little to do with school. It goes by many names that reflect a variety of approaches and philosophies—homeschooling, unschooling, home-based education, world schooling, life schooling, life learning. I have even heard it jokingly termed "car-schooling"!

The reality is that homeschooling is more than just a home-grown imitation of school, more than an educational method or choice. It is a total child-rearing choice, sometimes a philosophical or religious one, and for many it is nothing short of a way of life.

Meet the Author

Rachel Gathercole has a bachelor's degree in English from the University of North Carolina. She is a free-lance writer who has written for many homeschooling and parenting publications. She is also a co-leader in the Home Education Association of North Carolina, and an instructor for independent writing courses for homeschoolers. She has homeschooled her own three children.

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