The Whiskey Rebellion: George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the Frontier Rebels Who Challenged America's Newfound Sovereignty
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The Whiskey Rebellion: George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the Frontier Rebels Who Challenged America's Newfound Sovereignty

2.7 4
by William Hogeland
     
 

ISBN-10: 0743254902

ISBN-13: 9780743254908

Pub. Date: 04/11/2006

Publisher: Scribner

A gripping and sensational tale of violence, alcohol, and taxes, The Whiskey Rebellion uncovers the radical eighteenth-century people’s movement, long ignored by historians, that contributed decisively to the establishment of federal authority.

In 1791, on the frontier of western Pennsylvania, local gangs of insurgents with blackened faces began to

Overview

A gripping and sensational tale of violence, alcohol, and taxes, The Whiskey Rebellion uncovers the radical eighteenth-century people’s movement, long ignored by historians, that contributed decisively to the establishment of federal authority.

In 1791, on the frontier of western Pennsylvania, local gangs of insurgents with blackened faces began to attack federal officials, beating and torturing the tax collectors who attempted to collect the first federal tax ever laid on an American product—whiskey. To the hard-bitten people of the depressed and violent West, the whiskey tax paralyzed their rural economies, putting money in the coffers of already wealthy creditors and industrialists. To Alexander Hamilton, the tax was the key to industrial growth. To President Washington, it was the catalyst for the first-ever deployment of a federal army, a military action that would suppress an insurgency against the American government.

With an unsparing look at both Hamilton and Washington, journalist and historian William Hogeland offers a provocative, in-depth analysis of this forgotten revolution and suppression. Focusing on the battle between government and the early-American evangelical movement that advocated western secession, The Whiskey Rebellion is an intense and insightful examination of the roots of federal power and the most fundamental conflicts that ignited—and continue to smolder—in the United States.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780743254908
Publisher:
Scribner
Publication date:
04/11/2006
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.10(d)

Table of Contents

Contents

Prologue: The President, the West, and the Rebellion

1. Over the Mountains

2. The Curse of Pulp

3. Spirits Distilled Within the United States

4. Herman Husband

5. The Neville Connection

6. Tom the Tinker

7. The Hills Give Light to the Vales

8. A New Sodom

9. Talking

10. The General Goes West

11. That So-Called Whiskey Rebellion

Notes

Sources

Acknowledgments

Index

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The Whiskey Rebellion: George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the Frontier Rebels Who Challenged America's Newfound Sovereignty 2.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
neanderthal78 More than 1 year ago
This book was a must read for me because I live within five minutes of Mingo Creek, Mingo Church, and lots of other sites related to the rebellion. You can't grow up in this area without knowing about it. It's part of the local flavor. So I feel that I am very qualified to review this book based on geographical location and the fact that I've read just about everything out there on The Whiskey Rebellion. Here's the pros and cons of the book PROS: 1. Good story telling 2. Easy to read 3. Good starting point for those who want to read about this forgotten part of American history. 4. I like the focus on Brackenridge (a very entertaining character in our history). 5. If you hate Hamilton and/or Robert Morris you'll dig this book. CONS: 1. I found a very obvious error in his run through of the French and Indian War. The author states that the British were at Fort Pitt when the French attacked and took control. It wasn't Fort Pitt it was Fort Prince George. Actually it was a half built fort that was seized from an understaffed and undermanned group of poor souls that stood no chance against the overwhelming number of French from Canada. 2. Some of his Western Pennsylvania geography is a bit off in his description, especially his description of the Mingo area. I guess it wouldn't really matter to those just interested in the story and live outside of the area but for me its just a matter of pride being from here. 3. From new research Tom the Tinker may have been more than one man (some say three). Holfcroft was most likely one of them but there is evidence pointing to others also. 4. This book definitely has a bias. It should be apparent to anyone who reads more than 10 pages in. It didn't bother me but some might get annoyed. 5. If you really like Hamilton and/or Robert Morris be prepared to hate this book. I've read tons of books and articles on Alexander Hamilton (I even wrote a 50 page paper on him for an advanced history course dealing due history as a have and have not). Hamilton might be the hardest Founding Father to write a non-biased book/article about. There is just so much conflicting stories, primary source documents, and what have you, that it is really hard to really known Hamilton. When someone invents a time machine and goes back to interview the man and watch him in action then and only then will we get an accurate reading of this mans mind and heart. Villain or hero, it's hard to say. But like I said this is a good starting point and it does offer some good, solid facts that will be apparent if one reads other works about The Whiskey Rebellion. I say pick it up and enjoy.
Jason_Warren More than 1 year ago
This book was a required book for my Westward Expansion History Course in college.   Perhaps I missed it in the introduction, but the first several chapters follow specific people.  Not the actual events of the Whiskey Rebellion, but instead the events that lead to its inception.  After I figured that out around chapter five or six, the story started to make sense. It concludes with the bringing of everything together that was spoken about in the previous chapters.  It was an eye opening book for sure, and something I am glad to have in my library now.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago