×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The White Nights of Ramadan
     

The White Nights of Ramadan

by Maha Addasi, Ned Gannon (Illustrator)
 

See All Formats & Editions


This picture book for young readers shows how a young girl named Noor, who lives with her family in Kuwait, prepares for the Muslim festival known as Girgian along with her family.

Mid-Ramadan is a special time for families in the Arabian (Persian) Gulf. These middle days are known as "the three whites," because they include the day of the full moon, the day

Overview


This picture book for young readers shows how a young girl named Noor, who lives with her family in Kuwait, prepares for the Muslim festival known as Girgian along with her family.

Mid-Ramadan is a special time for families in the Arabian (Persian) Gulf. These middle days are known as "the three whites," because they include the day of the full moon, the day before, and the day after. It's a time when children, dressed in traditional clothes, go from house to house collecting treats from their neighbors. When Noor sees the full moon rising, signaling the coming of Girgian, she and her brothers prepare for the fun. Together, they decorate the bags they'll carry to collect the candies. But along with the fun, Noor remembers the true meaning of Ramadan: spending time with family and sharing with those less fortunate.

School Library Journal says: "An excellent choice for units on diversity and multiculturalism."

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Karen Leggett
It has long been possible to find books describing Christmas traditions in different countries. Now young readers have the same opportunity to learn about Ramadan traditions that vary by country. Ramadan is the holiest month of the year for Muslims, who are now the fastest growing religious group in the United States. In addition to fasting and praying, there are special regional customs during the month. Maha Addasi is a Kuwaiti now living in the United States. Her story revolves around the children of a family in Kuwait (although that is not explicitly stated except in the author's notes at the back of the book).Noor and her younger brothers are preparing with great excitement for Girgian, three nights when the moon is full and children walk from door to door collecting sweets. The root word garga'a actually means the sound of hard candy rattling in a bag. Not only is the moon full and white, but young boys wear the traditional long white gown called a dishdasha. Readers share in the children's excitement waiting for the sun to go down on the first day of Girgian and preparing special candies made of sugar and pistachios. After collecting their own sweets, children also take a basket of food to the local mosque, where it will be distributed to poor people. Ned Gannon's illustrations are warmly painted, but the town and landscape scenes are more appealing; the people often seem wooden and clumsy, like partially sculpted clay. The back pages include good explanatory notes as well as a short glossary. Reviewer: Karen Leggett
School Library Journal

Gr 1-4

This story is centered around Girgian , a Muslim celebration observed mostly in the Arabian Gulf states during the middle of the month of Ramadan. When Noor, who lives in Kuwait, sees the almost-full moon rise, she knows it's time to prepare for the festival. The family makes candy from honey, sugar, and nuts to share with the children in the neighborhood, wrapping it with cellophane and colorful bows. Then the siblings decorate canvas bags with bright colors, hoping to fill them with treats on the following evening. Noor spends the next day reading the Koran and praying while she fasts but wishes the time would go more quickly. Finally, the sun sets, and the streets are filled with youngsters singing, carrying fanouses (Ramadan lanterns), and knocking on doors to collect candy. Afterward, Noor and her grandfather deliver a food basket for the poor to the mosque. The story underlines the gift of sharing during a month dedicated to self-improvement and community welfare. Shimmering with moonlit hues, the attractive illustrations are done in a style that reflects one of many Muslim cultures. A helpful author's note and glossary are appended. An excellent choice for units on diversity and multiculturalism.-Fawzia Gilani-Williams, Oberlin Public Library, OH

Kirkus Reviews
Instead of focusing on Eid, the holiday that concludes Ramadan, this title recounts a Kuwaiti family's celebration of Girgian, a lesser-known tradition observed in many Persian Gulf countries. Noor and her younger brothers, Sam and Dan, prepare candy for the Halloween-like event in the middle of the month, when the moon is full. After praying, fasting and breaking their fast with an evening meal, the siblings don their traditional dress and walk door-to-door by lantern light. At each neighbor's house, Sam beats his drum and announces that he is the new musaher, a man who uses his drums to wake people for their predawn meal, and the children receive candy in return. Their grandmother acknowledges the fun surrounding Girgian, but reminds Noor of the true meaning of Ramadan. In the spirit of the religious observance, the girl concludes her exciting night by delivering food to the mosque. Illustrated with detailed, luminescent oils, this picture book makes an excellent introduction to this Muslim celebration and a good companion to Diane Hoyt-Goldsmith's Celebrating Ramadan (2001). (author's note, glossary) (Picture book. 7-10)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590785232
Publisher:
Highlights Press
Publication date:
08/01/2008
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
AD700L (what's this?)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

Meet the Author


Maha Addasi was born and grew up in Kuwait. A graduate of Butler University in Indiana, she worked in public relations for the Noor Al Hussein Foundation, directed by Queen Noor of Jordan. She was a news correspondent and producer for the English-language channels of Jordan Television and Dubai Television. She lives in Fairfax, Virginia.

Ned Gannon is a painter, an illustrator, and a writer. He attended the Kansas City Art Institute and received an MFA degree from the School of Visual Arts in New York. His work has appeared in New York galleries, in the Society of Illustrators, and in Communication Arts. He lives and teaches in Eau Claire, Wisconsin.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews