The Wild Kid

Overview

"Can I go home now?"
After his bike gets stolen, twelve-year-old Sammy gets lost in the woods near his home. He stumbles upon the makeshift hideaway of the "wild kid" named Kevin, who has run away from reform school. Will this strongly independent tough let Sammy get home to his family? Can they both survive in the unforgiving wilderness?

Twelve-year-old Sammy, who is mildly retarded, runs away from home and becomes a prisoner of ...

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The Wild Kid

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Overview

"Can I go home now?"
After his bike gets stolen, twelve-year-old Sammy gets lost in the woods near his home. He stumbles upon the makeshift hideaway of the "wild kid" named Kevin, who has run away from reform school. Will this strongly independent tough let Sammy get home to his family? Can they both survive in the unforgiving wilderness?

Twelve-year-old Sammy, who is mildly retarded, runs away from home and becomes a prisoner of Kevin, a wild kid living in the woods.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Readers may at first be misled, thinking that the wild kid of the title is the worried-looking boy clinging with long slender fingers to a cliff in the eye-catching jacket painting. However, once they reach the pictured climactic scene, readers may be surprised that the lad portrayed is the story's very tame protagonist, Sammy, a pudgy, maladroit 12-year-old with Down syndrome. With his simply worded third- person narrative, Mazer (Snowbound; The Dog in the Freezer) captures the thoughts and emotions--and occasionally profound insights--of someone whom most people, including the boy's own family, discount for being "retarded." Made to stay outside because he insulted his mother's boyfriend, "uncle" Carl, Sammy takes off on his bike rather than apologize. But the bike gets stolen, and in chasing down the thief, Sammy winds up lost in a nearby state forest where he literally stumbles across the eponymous Kevin. A reform-school escapee, Kevin at first keeps Sammy prisoner in his rude shelter, but then befriends him and teaches him to overcome some of his supposed disabilities. Sammy's innocent, doglike faith in suspicious, cynical Kevin is touching, yet not enough to sustain what is more like a novella than a full-length novel. And with the tensions that caused Sammy to leave home remaining unresolved upon his return, the ending falls flat. Ages 10-14. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Cheryl Peterson
Sammy is almost thirteen and some say he's slow, others say he's special, but Sammy thinks he knows a lot of things. When his mother and stepfather lock him out of the house for saying a bad word, he takes off on his bike to the store. His bike is stolen while he is browsing, and he attempts to chase the thief by hitching a ride on a truck. He ends up lost in the woods where he meets a kid named Kevin. Kevin is a runaway and is afraid to let Sammy go home because he will reveal his hiding place. An unusual friendship develops, and the boys depend on each other for survival. Sammy ultimately proves that he does indeed know a lot of things. An inspiring and often humorous story told from Sammy's viewpoint.
VOYA - Sarah K. Herz
This is a wonderful survival story about two unusual characters: twelve-year-old Sammy, who has Down's syndrome, and Kevin, a runaway teenager hiding from society. When Sammy and Kevin's paths accidentally cross in a forest preserve, they learn to trust and help one another. Sammy's conversation with his mother and sister reveals his stubborn innocence in dealing with situations. When his mother tries to persuade him to apologize to her friend for saying "crap to it," Sammy curses again, is locked out, announces "I'm never coming back," and rides away on his bike. Sammy becomes lost in a forest preserve where he meets up with Kevin, an alienated teenager whom Sammy calls the "wild kid." At first, Kevin is mean to Sammy but eventually he trusts Sammy and the two become friends. When Sammy comes up with a plan to have Kevin move in with his own family, he leaves the hideout to return home but gets trapped on the rock cliffs. Kevin cannot rescue Sammy himself, so he calls the police. Sammy is rescued and talks about Kevin, but the authorities are skeptical of Sammy's story about the wild boy who took care of him, and no one believes that a Down's syndrome child with no wilderness skills could survive on his own for two weeks. But his experience with Kevin has forged a new Sammy, as he tells his mother, "Don't baby me anymore. I can do things." Middle school readers will enjoy the fast-paced plot and the well-developed characters who learn to trust one another. VOYA Codes: 4Q 4P M (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses, Broad general YA appeal, Middle School-defined as grades 6 to 8).
KLIATT
Sammy, the Down's Syndrome protagonist, has a day that goes from bad to worse. First, he gets in trouble with his mom for saying rude words to his "Uncle Car." Next, when he goes to the store to get a candy bar his bike is stolen. Chasing after his bike, Sammy becomes lost in the forest. He meets a wild kid, Kevin, who refuses to let him leave lest it get Kevin discovered and in trouble. All is not too bad—Kevin teaches Sammy how to tie his shoes, and even takes him along on trips. Soon, however, Sammy is eager to get back to his family, school, and home, yet he cannot seem to figure out how to return. This book was selected for inclusion in the School Library Journal Best Books of 1998, as well as earning a place on the Horn Book Fanfare List. Reluctant readers will enjoy this survival tale, which is really about the evolution of the character of Sammy, and how he matures over the course of the story. Strongly recommended purchase for school and public library collections, especially for fans of adventure stories, and reluctant readers. KLIATT Codes: J—Recommended for junior high school students. 1998, Simon & Schuster, Aladdin Adventure, 103p, 20cm, 97-42578, $4.99. Ages 13 to 15. Reviewer: Tricia Finch; Youth Scvs. Mgr., North Port P.L., North Port, FL, September 2000 (Vol. 34 No. 5)
School Library Journal
Gr 4-8-Sammy's troubles keep escalating. First he is punished for being fresh to Mom's friend Carl. Then he goes off to the store by himself, which is forbidden, and his new bike is stolen when he fails to chain it. Chasing the thief, Sammy becomes lost. Mazer brings the boy to life without revealing to readers anything that Sammy wouldn't tell, until Kevin, a wild kid who holds him captive in the woods, asks him if he's dumb. He says, "No, I'm Down's. I'm young for my age. I'm a special person." Vividly and with a fast pace, Mazer describes Sammy's world, his awful predicament, his magnificent spirit, and his incredible determination. The wild kid gradually changes from a vicious monster into a friend. As Sammy says, "Just because you're not always good doesn't make you bad." During their time together, Kevin and Sammy learn some important lessons from one another. The sentences are short, the descriptions simple, and the interaction between the characters complex and intriguing. Readers need to piece together Kevin's history and decipher the sometimes conflicting statements that Sammy makes. Phrases often used with persons with disabilities echo throughout the narrative. Yet this is not a "special" book for "special" readers, as sometimes books are termed that are too difficult or too limited in appeal. It's for anyone looking for an adventure, a survival story on many levels, or a compelling read.-Carol A. Edwards, Sonoma County Library, Santa Rosa, CA
Kitty Flynn
With remarkable restraint and without sentimentality, Mazer tells the story of Sammy, a twelve-year-old boy with Down syndrome held captive in the woods by Kevin, a delinquent teenage runaway. Convincingly told from Sammy's guileless point of view, the spare and simple narrative is at turns harrowing and touching. Short, suspenseful chapters move the action along; intriguing characterization lends depth to the drama. When Sammy, who's far from his home and lost, stumbles upon Kevin's forest lair, Kevin ties Sammy up, afraid that if he lets Sammy go, Kevin will be tracked down and sent back to reform school. Sammy never wavers in his desire to go home, but his optimistic outlook and good humor eventually win Kevin's confidence, and an unlikely friendship develops between the two boys. Angry, hostile Kevin comes to depend on Sammy's companionship; overprotected Sammy, who has been punished-and sometimes hit-for not behaving like "an almost-grown-up person," gets a taste of independence and freedom while surviving in the woods, as Kevin insists that he learn to do things on his own. Mazer manages to portray both the victim and the victimizer as sympathetic, complex characters, something Sammy knows is true all along: "Just because you're not always good doesn't make you bad." The realistic ending, which finds Sammy safe and at home, leaves Kevin's story unresolved and a deep ache in Sammy's heart. "People said Sammy was slow, but he knew things." Sammy, who knows about forgiveness and hope, is worth taking time to listen to.
--Horn Book
Kirkus Reviews
When 12-year-old Sammy, who has Down's syndrome, gets lost (while he chases after his stolen bike and its rider, he climbs on the back of a truck and winds up miles from home), he encounters Kevin, a runaway who has been living on his own in the forest. Afraid that Sammy will give him away to the authorities, Kevin won't let him return home, and eventually the two boys form a tenuous friendship. Although Kevin grows protective, Sammy never loses his determination to leave; when he makes his break, he ends up in danger, and Kevin risks his freedom to save him. In the poignant ending, Sammy, safe at home, holds on to the hope that one day Kevin will come to live with him; no one else believes Kevin exists. Mazer (Twelve Shots, 1997, etc.), keeping the perspective strictly Sammy's, structures the story so that the boys are two sides of the same coin: one dependent and sweet-natured, but with a stubborn streak, and the other tough, self-reliant, and kind only at the core. Realistically, and with small, honest gestures, each helps the other to grow; Sammy becomes more independent, while Kevin becomes more compassionate. An exciting, unusual survival story, very well told. (b&w illustrations, not seen) (Fiction. 10-14)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780689822896
  • Publisher: Aladdin
  • Publication date: 7/1/2000
  • Edition description: Repackage
  • Pages: 112
  • Sales rank: 784,459
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.12 (w) x 7.62 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Harry Mazer is the author of many books for young readers, including Please, Somebody Tell Me Who I Am; My Brother Abe; the Boy at War trilogy; The Wild Kid; The Dog in the Freezer; The Island Keeper; and Snow Bound. His books have won numerous honors, including a Horn Book honor and an American Library Association Best Book for Young Adults citation. Along with his wife, Norma Fox Mazer, Harry received an ALAN award in 2003 for outstanding contribution to adolescent literature. He lives in Montpelier, Vermont.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 21 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    On the Edge of Your Seat!!

    A boy named Sammy, who has Down's syndrome ran away. He decided to go to his friend's house and when he wasn't home, he went to a candy store. When he came out, his bike had been stolen. He chased the thief. He jumped on the back of a truck. Then he got chased off into the woods. He got lost and ran into a wild kid. Read the story to find out more. The book is The Wild Kid by Harry Mazer.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    Mysterious and Exciting!!!!

    Have you ever wanted to read a story with suspense and mystery? Well,if you haven't you should read The Wild Kid by Harry Mazer. In the story a 12 year old boy, named Sammy, has a mental illness. He does and says things that he really doesn't mean to say or do. After his mom locks him out, he runs after the thief that stole his bike. In the process, he gets lost in the woods and runs into a wild kid named Kevin. Kevin took care of Sammy after he got to know him. Feeding him junk and giving him a dirt shelter, they grew to know and almost love each other like brothers. I used to know a girl older than I am; she was just like Sammy. She was very sweet and kind to everyone. I thought the book was very good and exciting. I just wanted to keep on reading. The lesson I learned from this book is that I should never judge a person on how they look, I should get to know them first. Also I learned that I should respect the people that have mental illnesses. They are just like us in a way. I recommend this book to anyone that knows someone like Sammy , to people who judge other people too quickly, to people that love a happy ending, ,and to people who love a lot of mystery and suspense.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    Will They Survive?

    Have you read a book by Harry Mazer? If you have,then you have read some pretty good books.If you haven't, you should read The Wild Kid.The title of the book makes you want to read it even more.Sammy is a boy who is mentally challenged.He doesn't understand things.He gets put outside because he said a bad word. He refuses to say I am sorry, so his mother tells him until you say you're sorry you are going to stay outside.Therefore, he runs away. He goes to the store for some candy and while purchasing his candy, his bike gets stolen. On the mission of following his bike tracks, he gets lost in the woods meeting the Wild Kid, Kevin. At this point I became more interested because I was once in this situation. I once got lost in the mall. Kevin, who runs away from a reform school, is my favorite character for his will to be free. My opinion of this book is that it was very suspenseful because you never knew what would happen next. I would recommend this book to anyone. The question that I have to ask you this question, Do you think they will survive?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    Wild Kid

    Harry Mazer has written the next best book again.The Wild Kid is an outstanding book. The story was about this 12 year old boy named Sammy that had a mild-case of Down's syndrome. His mother and he had a disagreement. He took his bike and ran away. I kind of know how Sammy felt because my mother and I disagree all the time. I think Sammy's mother was wrong for telling Sammy he couldn't come in the house unless he apologized to his uncle for calling him a name. I would recommend this book to anyone that has Down's syndrome or anyone who disrespects people that has Down's syndrome or any other disease. The reason for that is so they could relate to Sammy and that they should know that they are strong for any challenge. I learned that everyone is not the same and if you just give someone a chance, they can become your friend. Will Sammy go home alive or dead? Read the book and find out!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    Wild Kid

    The story was about a boy named Sammy who met Kevin, the wild kid,in the woods. The story began with Sammy leaving his home on his bike. He decided to stop at the candy store. While he was in the store, his bike was stolen. He ran after the culprit who stole his bike and got lost in the woods. While in the woods, he runs into Kevin. He takes care of Sammy, but Sammy wants to see his family.I think that towards the end of the book Sammy and I began sharing common interests. Sometimes I've just wanted to run away, like Sammy. I'm also a good swimmer, just like him. I enjoyed reading this book. My favorite place was when Kevin and Sammy first met. I thought it was bad when Kevin abused Sammy like dirt. I would recommend this book to people who like stories about friendship, survival, and adventures of the outdoors. What I learned from this book is that people with Down's syndrome are just as smart as other people.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    A Book That Deserves A Sequel!!!

    Have you ever read a book you just can't put down? Well, if you haven't, you should read THE WILD KID by Harry Mazer. In the beginning of the novel, Sammy, a twelve-year-old boy, with Down's syndrome, had gotten thrown out of the house for being mean to Carl, his mother's boyfriend. Sammy's mother said he could come back in if he apologized to Carl. He hated Carl! Sammy was so mad that he got on his bike and went to the local supermarket to buy a candy bar. While purchasing the candy bar, Sammy's brand new bike is stolen! Sammy starts to run after the thief that stole his bike. While running, Sammy starts to get lost in the woods and suddenly falls into Kevin's hut or house. Kevin, who looks like a billy goat, is a runaway, makeshift, hideaway, who has run from reform school. During the first couple of days, Kevin holds Sammy hostage. As time passes on, Kevin and Sammy become great friends. Wanna know the ending? Well,...I can't tell you that! I would ruin the ending! I could connect to this story because I had gotten lost in a mall once and was really scared. My personal opinion of this book is that it was a really great book. It teaches a great lesson, just because you're different doesn't mean you're not human. I learned a lot from this book, like, people with Down's syndrome are just like you and me, normal. I would definently recommend this book to anybody that treats Down's syndrome people differently than other people.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    Wild Kid

    This book was about a 12-year old named Smmy who has Down's syndrome, and gets lost in the woods and struggles to survive. while in the woods, he meets Kevin, or K-man.Kevin does not let him leave because of the fact that he is a refugee from reform school, and he thinks that Sammy will tell them his whereabouts.i can't tell you anymore about this book.i can relate to this book because i can swim and i like to go outside alot. i would recommend thisbok to anyone who likes suspense because this book delivers lots of it. i learned that people with Down's syndrome are the same as people without it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    Wild Kid

    Boy, talk about the book The Wild Kid. The setting took place in the wild. Kevin and Sammy have to survive the troubles they face. They had to eat out of a trash can showing the desperation of the hunger they were going through. In the forest, they stayed in Kevin's hut for extended days while day and night goes by. The main characters in this story were Kevin, who had no life learned situations, and Sammy, a 12 year old boy, who has a disease called Down's syndrome. I felt this story was one of the best books I've read in awhile. Sammy and Kevin survived in the wild, the way they did, was amazing. I say that because I know good in well I wouldn't have survived for two weeks time in some forest. If I would have to relate to anyone in the story I would have to say Kevin. You know I might come off aggressive at first, but when I were to get more comfortable with someone, I become easier to work with. In a way, I may sometimes feel like I don't have to apologize for something I didn't do wrong. In a way like Sammy did when he didn't apologize so he had to stay outside. I felt this book had a good message by it. It gives morals such as showing that anyone can do something even with a disorder, to then accomplish their goal. That's why I rated this book The Wild Kid with four outstanding stars.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    This book keeps you on your toes!

    If you like books that have to do with survial, you should read The Wild Kid by Harry Mazer. The book's about a boy, Sammy, who has Down's Syndrome and Kevin, the wild kid. Sammy runs away from home since his mom put him out because he said a bad word. While he's in the store buying a candy bar, someone steals his new bike. Once Sammy realizes his bike's gone, he chases after the thief until he falls down an embankment and gets lost in the woods. That's where the 'wild kid' comes in! Kevin and Sammy meet in the woods and slowly become friends. They live eating food out of trashcans and rabbit, and stealing money. Kevin's been living in the woods almost all his life and Sammy's only there for 13 days. I was moved by this story because the point of Sammy being a minor D.S. patient is sad and I feel sorry for him but I'm happy that he's strong! The themes in the story are survival and equality. Sammy had to survive 13 days in the woods and he has D.S. but he's still a human being like you and me; we're EQUAL! I think The Wild Kid was a good book, even though it's not my type of book and I wasn't really into the book. I would recommend this book to anyone, especially mentally challenged people because it lets them know they are special and we need them in the world. People who've had to go experience being stranded and having to survive might enjoy this book because they could relate to it. -'It takes all kinds of people to make the world go around.'-

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    Survival With a Twist

    Have you ever read a book with a good twist? Well, the book the Wild Kid is one of those. It is about Sammy Ritchie who was born with Down's syndrome. In the the beginning of the book, Sammy is sent out for using innapropriate language. He then runs away on his bike. He goes to his friend's house and when he finds out he is not home, he goes to the corner store and buys a candy bar. While he is paying for his candy bar, somone steals his bike. He then chases after the thief. While chasing the thief, he gets lost in the woods. He then ends up falling on top of a cave. He falls off the top of it and is taken captive by a wild kid who lives inside of it. The boys name is Kevin. Kevin is a boy who had ran away for a reform school and went to live in the woods. Soon Kevin warms up to him and gives him a few freedoms and lets him live with him. To find out the rest you'll have to read it yourself. I personally enjoyed this book because it was a survival novel about friends. I recommend this book to survival lovers.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    Have you had an adventure lately?

    Have you read a good book lately? I have read The Wild Kid. At first, I thought it would be another boring book, but this book inspired me to read more of Harry Mazer's books. The Wild Kid has a unique character, Sammy Ritchie. Sammy has Down's syndrome. Sammy is the main character of the novel. One day Sammy said somethings to Carl, his mother's boyfriend. Then his mother sent him outside. That was the last time she saw him. Sammy decided to go to a store but when he got out his bike was gone. He saw the bike tacks and followed them into the woods. He found a wild kid named Kevin. Kevin was bad, but he softened up and be came good friends with Sammy. They ate everything they could put in there mouthes. This is a great book; everyone I know loves this book. I recommend this book to everyone. I give this book five stars. If you're someone who doesn't like to read, then this book is for you.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    It's to Good To Put Down!!

    Have you ever read a book so good you can't put it down? Well, if you haven't then you need to read The Wild Kid, by Harry Mazer. This book is about a boy named Sammy. He has Down's Syndrome. His mom kicked him out of the house for saying a bad word to his Uncle Carl. His mom said he could come back in if he apologizes to Carl. He doesn't want to apologize so he gets his bike and takes off to the store. He leaves his bike unchained and when he comes back he notices that his bike is gone. He sees the rider across the street so he takes off chasing after him. He chases for a while then loses him. He takes off through the woods and sees a window. He then meets the Wild Kid Kevin. At first Kevin is really mean to him . Then they become really good friends and Kevin shows him alot of stuff that he never knew how to do. Sammy eats alot of stuff he never thought of eating but ends up liking it. He and Kevin He and Kevin are really good friends now, but then something happens. If you want to find out what happens next then read this book. I really liked this book and if I liked it then I know you will too. It is a wonderful book.I wouls recommend this book to someone because I know they will enjoy it!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    He is challenged, but will he survive?

    A good book only comes around once in a while, and this was a good book.It was a book that has action and mystery. This is a book that you can't put down.In this book,a boy named Sammy has Down's syndrome. He got in trouble one day for saying a bad word. His mom sent him outside, but when he tried to sneak back in through his sister's Bethan's window, his mom found him and made him get down. He was angry so he ran away to the grocery store. While buying a candy bar, his bike was stolen. Chasing after the theif, he ended up getting lost in the woods where he met the Wild Kid.I have never been lost before but reading this bookmade me feel like I have.The only thing I have done in the story was hunting.Just like when Kevin and Sammy went hunting for rabbits.I thought this book was good.I really liked it when Sammy saved Kevin from drowning.My favorite character was Kevin because he was strong and brave.The main characters were Sammy and Kevin (the Wild Kid).I would definitly recommend this book to anyone who has been lost in the woods.I learned that you should never judge by the outside ,but it's the inside that counts.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    Wild Kid

    Sammie is a 12 year old boy with Down's syndrome. Sammie's dad died and he never got to know him. His mom has a new boyfriend that Sammie doesn't like. He is bossy around Sammie. Sometimes Sammie says bad words to him. One time his mother found out he said a bad word and kicked him out of the house until he said he was sorry. Sammie got very mad and ran away on his bike to a store. When he came out the store, his bike was gone. He saw a kid riding away on it. Sammie tried to catch him but ended up getting lost in the woods. Sammie fell and landed beside a small cave. A boy named Kevin was hiding out there who ran away from an orphanage. For three weeks,Sammie lived with Kevin. I learnd from this book that people that are very different can come together to survive. I would recommend this book to anyone. The Wild Kid is a great fun easy book to read. Please read to find out what happens in the end!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    Survival of the Fittest...

    Sammy has Down's Syndrome. He really does not look like it. Around his house, he is not allowed to say words, I say everyday. He has a sister and a so-called uncle. His mom kicks him out of the house for saying a 'bad word.' Sammy is so angry that he vows to never come back. He goes to get his bike and goes to a freind's house who is not home. Then he goes to the store for a candy bar. When he comes out, he can't find his bike. He goes back into the store interrogating the fat guy. When he can't find it, he goes outside and starts chasing the muddy tire tracks. After all of this he ends up with another person named Kevin and they become freinds. You'll have to read the book to find out the ending. Sometimes when I go to McDonald's. I see people with Down's Syndrome. I gently say 'hi' and order my food. I saw a movie called 'I am Sam'. It showed me the other side of people with Down's, the fact that they are always kind and gentle. My opinion is that this book is great. I learned and gained from this book, a sense of survival. I recommend this book to everyone I know. You will not be in dissapointed. If you are the kind of person that enjoys reading a survival and action book, this book is for you...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    It'll leave on the edge of your seat.

    If you are looking for an adventure ,then I suggest The Wild Kid by Harry Mazer. This book is filled with suspense.It tells about a boy named Sammy who has Down's Syndrome and decides to run away.When his mom kicked him out for saying a bad word and couldn't come back in until he apologized. So Sammy tooked his bike to see his friend Billy, but he wasn't there, than he went to purchase some candy, while doing so his bike was stolen. In the pursuit of trying to get it back he end up getting lost in the woods, soon he wasn't alone a wild kid named Kevin (K-man) captured Sammy. Along the way they started to be friends, even though Sammy missed his family. My least favorite part was the unexpected twist of the turnout. If I could change a part in the story it would be the ending. This is an extrodanary book, because of the non-stop advenure. I would reccomend this book for all ages.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    It's So Good That It Will Take Your Breath Away!!!

    Have you ever read a book that you begin and don't want to end? Well, this is the case in the book The Wild Kid, by Harry Mazer. In this book, Sammy Richie, who has Down's syndrome, gets kicked out of the house for saying a bad word and he can't come back in until he apologizes to his Uncle Carl. So instead of apologizing, Sammy decides to runaway. While he's using his money to buy some candy, a boy steals his bike. Sammy starts chasing the boy and in the process, he gets lost in the woods. In the woods, Sammy finds a wild kid named Kevin. They become best friends. One day Kevin saves Sammy's life and another day Sammy saves Kevin's life. Sammy admires Kevin a lot and he wants to stay in the woods with Kevin, but he wants to go home to visit his family and tell his mother where he is. When they go to the mall, a person recognizes them... My favorite character was Kevin because he always kept his cool in every situation and he had a good sense of leadership. I felt like I could relate to Kevin because he wanted to be independent and so do I. I gained a good sense of survival from reading this book. My favorite part of the book was the ending; it is very suspenseful. If you want to find out what happens, read The Wild Kid, by Harry Mazer. I would highly recommend this book to people that like adventure stories. You really should read this wonderful book even if you're not a big fan of reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    An emotional Cliffhanger

    The life of a child with special needs does not always showup in abook. Yet, in the fictionus book The Wild Kid by Harry Mazer, expose it all.I have gave this book a five star rating, for its excellents in truth-telling about special needes children. The book stars out witha 12 year old boy with Down's-syndrome named Sammy Ritchie,outside his home.He is put outside for saying a 'bad word' to Carl,Sammy's mother boyfriend. Sammy gets upset and runs away,thinking he could live with his best friend.Sammy ,now relizing his friend is missing from his home,vistits the cornor store. After, purchesing his items, he finds out that his bike is being rode off by a stanger.Sammy get lost chasing after the unknown stranger.At this point Sammy is lost,alone, and afraid. Unknowing to Sammy, he is not the only person alone in the woods.Kevin,a an older boy liveing in the woods finds and befriends Sammy. Sammy beggs and pled for Kevin to take him back home. Kevin, wouldn't let him leave. One day while visting the mallfor food, Sammy is aproched by a woman. She says she knows him from the newspaper. She knows he is missing, so she... Well, your going o have to read the book to know what happen next. Did they get caught? Will Sammy return home? Why won't Kevin let Sammy go home? WHO IS THE WILD KID? I recommend this book to everyone.Young and Old, it teaches people that you can be nice to a metally challenged person insted of talking and teasing. Plus, at the end of every chapter lies a suspenseful cliffhanger.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2003

    Wild Kid

    The book The Wild Kid written by Harry Mazer is an adventurous book. It is about a boy, Sammy, who has Down's syndrome. He says a bad word to his mom's boyfriend and gets sent out of the house. He decides to get a candy bar but forgets to lock his bike up with the 'special' chain. While he is in the gas station paying, someone steals his bike. He chases after the person but can't catch up. He jumps into the back of a truck. He watches the road for bike tracks but they stop, so he jumps out and ends up in the woods. He meets the wild kid, Kevin, and stays with him until he wants to go home. This book was interesting because I know a girl named Molly who has Down's syndrome. she is a lot stronger than other people. This book is good so I gave it four stars. I recommend this book to anyone who wants a good book to read and a book that they just can't put down. To find out what happened to Sammy, read the book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2003

    Wild Kid

    Have you ever read a book that kept you wondering what happened next? How about getting you to make predictions after every chapter? This is what the book Wild Kid, can do to you. This book is authorized by Harry Mazer, a wonderful writer. The story starts out with a boy named Sammy who has a mental disability, called Down's syndrome. After getting kicked out of his house, he gets lost in the woods. He finds a boy, named Kevin, who is an escaped convict that is fleeing from the police; afterwards, they become friends. I can relate to Sammy, becaue I accidentally say bad words, without meaning to, also. I really enjoyed this story, because it was a 'wild' experience for me. My favorite part was at the very end, because I could not tell whether Kevin was real, or not. I am not willing to change anything, because Harry Mazer is a brilliant author and a wonderful story teller. I would recommend this book to my brother, because I think that he would really enjoy it.

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