The Winter People [NOOK Book]

Overview

The New York Times bestselling author of Promise Not to Tell returns with a simmering literary thriller about ghostly secrets, dark choices, and the unbreakable bond between mothers and daughters . . . sometimes too unbreakable.

West Hall, Vermont, has always been a town of strange disappearances and old legends. The most mysterious is that of Sara Harrison Shea, who, in 1908, was found dead in the field behind her house just months after the ...
See more details below
The Winter People

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

The New York Times bestselling author of Promise Not to Tell returns with a simmering literary thriller about ghostly secrets, dark choices, and the unbreakable bond between mothers and daughters . . . sometimes too unbreakable.

West Hall, Vermont, has always been a town of strange disappearances and old legends. The most mysterious is that of Sara Harrison Shea, who, in 1908, was found dead in the field behind her house just months after the tragic death of her daughter, Gertie. Now, in present day, nineteen-year-old Ruthie lives in Sara's farmhouse with her mother, Alice, and her younger sister, Fawn. Alice has always insisted that they live off the grid, a decision that suddenly proves perilous when Ruthie wakes up one morning to find that Alice has vanished without a trace. Searching for clues, she is startled to find a copy of Sara Harrison Shea's diary hidden beneath the floorboards of her mother's bedroom. As Ruthie gets sucked deeper into the mystery of Sara's fate, she discovers that she's not the only person who's desperately looking for someone that they've lost. But she may be the only one who can stop history from repeating itself.
Read More Show Less
  • The Winter People
    The Winter People  

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review - Terrence Rafferty
McMahon is a scrupulous writer, nicely attentive to nuances of character and landscape.
Publishers Weekly
11/25/2013
In this scary thriller, McMahon (The One I Left Behind) explores how far people will go to save the ones they love, and what results when they go too far. In 1908, Sara Harrison Shea, a resident of West Hall, Vt., becomes convinced she can bring her murdered daughter back to life. In the present day, 19-year-old Ruthie Washburne’s mother vanishes from their farm without a trace, forcing Ruthie to research West Hall’s dark history of disappearances, animal sacrifice, and inexplicable phenomena. Ruthie’s chilling discovery that Sara was found murdered with her skin removed a few months after her daughter’s burial raises the stakes. Almost every character is imbued with a great deal of psychological depth, which makes the stereotypical portrayal of Auntie, a Native American sorceress, all the more disappointing. McMahon is more successful when she deftly switches between past and present, using the changes in perspective to increase the tension. Author tour. Agent: Daniel Lazar, Writers House. (Feb.)
From the Publisher
"One of the year’s most chilling novels. She melds the mystery genre with the supernatural for a psychological thriller that is as scary as it is enthralling." —The Miami Herald

“Jennifer McMahon is a writer of exceptional talent, and The Winter People is a hypnotic, gripping and deeply moving thriller. With her beautifully drawn characters and complex, layered, and suspenseful story, McMahon has woven a dream from which I didn't want to wake—and couldn't have even if I wanted to.” —Lisa Unger, author of In the Blood 

"Crisp, mysterious and scary.... The Winter People has a consistently eerie atmosphere, and some of its darker supernatural flights are reminiscent of Stephen King." —USA Today

“I don't believe in ghosts. At least that’s what I kept telling myself as I read The Winter People. I also don't need to sleep with the lights on. I told myself that, too. But I was whistling past a graveyard—or, in this case—past a Vermont landscape that is authentic and recognizable and still altogether chilling. The Winter People is terrifying—everything you could want in a classic ghost story.” —Chris Bohjalian, author of The Light in the Ruins

"A fascinatingly creepy tale. The historical foundation and the modern mystery blend together seamlessly, making the reader eager to find out the secrets Sara Harrison Shea might have known, while the exploration of mother-daughter love and loss makes both Sara's and Ruthie's narratives irresistible. Not a book to be read late at night, or in a creaky old house, The Winter People is a literary thriller to savor." —Shelf Awareness 


"A ghost story that is ... all too human.... A hauntingly beautiful read." Oprah.com 

 
“In an edge-of-your-seat scary ghost story, Jennifer McMahon’s The Winter People yanks you from one page to the next by expertly weaving the past and present. I will never look at the woods behind my home in the same way again!” —Heather Gudenkauf, author of The Weight of Silence 

 
“A deliciously terrifying glimpse into a ghostly world that will haunt you long after you’ve finished the last page. Jennifer McMahon knows how to conjure your darkest fears and nightmares, while entertaining you with a clever, twisty plot that winds around and around, pulling you deep into the forbidden, secret world of The Winter People.” —Chevy Stevens, author of Always Watching
 
“This is not a book that will sit unread on anyone’s bedside table for very long. Open the first few pages and you are swept into a swift, dark current of unfolding events that will hold you enthralled. Much more than a spooky mystery of murder and mayhem, The Winter People blends the anguish of loss and the yearning for connection into one great story, well told.”  —Kate Alcott, author of The Dressmaker

Library Journal
09/15/2013
A century after Sara Harrison Shea was found dead behind her Vermont house following the tragic loss of her daughter, Ruthie lives in the same house with her sister and their mother, Alice. When Alice disappears, Ruthie reads Sara's crumbling diary and sees eerie parallels. Twisty psychological suspense following the New York Times best seller Promise Not To Tell.
Kirkus Reviews
2013-12-07
A peaceful Vermont village turns creepy in this tale of the dead returning to life. Sara Harrison Shea's precious daughter, Gertie, dies in 1908 during a harsh and unforgiving winter in which her mother and father, Martin, struggle to keep food on the table. Gertie isn't the first child Sara has lost, but her death is the one she has the most difficult time accepting. When she refuses to believe that Gertie is gone forever and blames Martin for her loss, Sara sets in motion a tragic and horrifying chain of events that will forever change the lives of everyone around them. Flashing back and forth between Sara's time period and the present, the author evokes a sense of suffering and hopelessness as she gathers a cast of characters who bring out the worst in one another: the mysterious, otherworldly Auntie who raised Sara and died before Gertie's birth; the present-day sisters, Ruthie and lemur-eyed, feverish Fawn, who live with their mother, Alice, known in the town as the Egg Lady; and Katherine, newly arrived, a recent widow and artist who is also mourning her lost son. Alice and her late husband were careful to shield their daughters from the outside world, forbidding them access to the Internet, television and other technology, and home-schooling Ruthie. So when Alice vanishes, Ruthie's search for her causes her to cross paths with people and things she doesn't understand. McMahon, a masterful storyteller who understands how to build suspense, creates an ocean of tension that self-implodes in the last two-thirds of the book. That's when her characters make implausible decisions that cause them to behave like teens in low-budget horror films who know there's a mad killer on the loose, yet when they hear noises in the basement, they go down alone to investigate anyway. Although she writes flawless prose, McMahon's characters' improbable choices derail her story.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385538503
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 2/11/2014
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 2,966
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

JENNIFER MCMAHON is the author of six novels, including the New York Times bestsellers Island of Lost Girls and Promise Not to Tell. She graduated from Goddard College and studied poetry in the MFA Writing Program at Vermont College. She currently lives with her partner and daughter in Montpelier, Vermont.
Read More Show Less

Reading Group Guide

1. At the heart of the novel is the longing to be reunited with a loved one who has died. How would you respond to this possibility, even if you could only see your beloved for one week? What risks would you take to take to experience such a reunion?

2. What was it like to read Sara’s diary, alternating with scenes from other time periods? Did Sara’s words change your vision of the spirit world? Did her bond with Gertie remind you of your own experience with a mother’s love?

3. When Alice and her family inhabit Sara’s house and her land, how does that environment transform them? Do you believe that the history of a locale can influence your present-day experiences there?

4. Ruthie and Fawn have been raised to question authority and to live a non-materialistic life. What benefits and challenges does their upbringing give them when their mother goes missing? Ultimately, what did Alice try to teach her daughters about becoming fulfilled women?

5. Reread the excerpt from Amelia’s introduction on the book’s first page. How do Amelia and the other townspeople react to their legacies? Why did Reverend Ayers feel so threatened by Auntie?

6. Martin cherishes Sara and continually strives to please her. Does she love him in equal measure, or does her ancestry make it too difficult for an outsider to fully share a life with her?

7. How was Sara affected by her history with her siblings, Constance and Jacob? Why did their father easily become dependent on Auntie, while Sara’s mother didn’t trust her?

8. Did Tom and Bridget O’Rourke have ethical motivations? Did Candace? How do the revelations about them affect Ruthie’s sense of self?

9. How did you react to Gertie’s hunger? What is its significance to the maternal women who must care for her?

10. Discuss Katherine and Gary’s love for each other. How does their marriage compare to the others presented in the book? How do Katherine’s art and Gary’s photography give them a unique perspective on life and memory? What does their story indicate about whether a sleeper should be awakened?

11. Consider the rules for waking a sleeper. What do the words and the ingredients represent in terms of the cycles of life and the nature of death?

12. What were your theories about the many unsolved deaths in West Hall? Did your instincts prove to be correct when the truth about the Devil’s Hand was revealed?

13. In The Winter People and previous novels by Jennifer McMahon that you have enjoyed, how is the author able to make surreal situations seem highly realistic? What role do fear and courage play in each of her books? 

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 47 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(20)

4 Star

(16)

3 Star

(8)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 47 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 11, 2014

    What a great book this was to read around Halloween! When I sta

    What a great book this was to read around Halloween! When I started this novel, I was also reading three other books at the same time, but dropped them to focus on this one because I couldn't wait to see what would happen. A small New England town during winter, disappearances, murders, and 'sleepers' - what a perfect setup for a captivating read.

    I'm not giving anything away when I say the 'sleepers' in this story brought to mind Stephen King's Pet Sematary - the sleepers are mentioned on the first page by Sara in her diary. This is the first book I've read in quite some time where the story is told primarily in varying female perspectives. The reader is taken back to the early 1900's in Sara's point of view and then to present day from Ruthie and Kathleen's perspectives. Sara's husband also gets a couple of chapters of his own, but those just helped me understand Sara even more. It became evident early on there was a connection between most of the characters in this story and the mystery of that is what kept me turning the pages.

    I enjoyed all the characters in this book, even if I doubted their sanity and innocence at times. As a mother, I could understand Sara's grief, her inability to let go of her child, and the boundaries she crossed to keep that from happening.

    This was a wonderful blend of thriller, mystery, and horror genres - not the blood and gore type, more of the goosebumps-on-your-arms, hair-on-the-back-of-your-neck-raising, don't-look-over-your-shoulder kind. I haven't read anything by this author before and, looking at some other reviews, this is apparently a different path for her, but I enjoyed the journey.

    This review is based on a digital ARC from the publisher through NetGalley.

    11 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2014

    Spooky

    This is the first book i have read by her and could not put it down. Did remind me a bit of pet cemetery, only better. When I was reading last night, I even "let" my kids sleep in my bed just to have someone else in the room:)

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 11, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    3.5/5 It seems to be things that go bump in the night week for

    3.5/5 It seems to be things that go bump in the night week for me! Jennifer McMahon's latest book is The Winter People.

    I love the dedication.....

    " For Zeila. Because one day, you wanted to play a really creepy game about two sisters whose parents had disappeared in the woods ..... Sometimes it just happens."

    And that's exactly what happens. Ruthie and Fawn live with their mother Alice in West Hall, Vermont on a hardscrabble farm near a rocky ridge known as The Devil's Hand. When Alice disappears without a trace, the girls search the house for clues - and come upon a diary hidden under the floorboards. The diary is from 1908 and belonged to Sara, a former resident of the house. What Ruthie reads seems impossible. But again, there have always been rumours and legends about Devil's Hand. And people do go missing.....

    McMahon weaves her story through past and present as the girls search for their mother and we catch up by reading Sara's diary from 1908.

    "She's one of the winter people. The people who are stuck between here and there, waiting. It reminds me of winter, how everything is all pale and cold and full of nothing, and all you can do is wait for sparing."

    I really enjoyed the build up of the story and found it hard to put down - I wanted to know what had happened and what was going to happen. But I found one of the final characters involved in the ending overdone and the conclusion was a little too predictable and somewhat familiar. (Think Pet Semetary) For me, this somewhat detracted from what had been a good horror/ghost story up until then. Of the two narratives, I preferred Sara's from 1908. It was scarier and more atmospheric.

    Still, The Winter People kept me turning pages on a dark winter night. Entertaining, but not my favourite McMahon book. (Island of Lost Girls is my fave.)

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 28, 2014

    Awesome!!!

    I hate when people write reviews and spoil the whole book-so the only thing I will say about this book is......it is an awesome read.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2014

    wonderful book

    Extremely creepy, intricate and will keep you glued til the last page. Definition of a pageturner. If you like ghosts and mysteries all layered in one another, this book is ideal for you.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 12, 2014

    It's been so long since I've had the pleasure of reading a page-

    It's been so long since I've had the pleasure of reading a page-turning Gothic novel.  Daphne DuMaurier was one of my very favorites, Anne Rice is an awesome writer in this vein, but lately she has gone into new territory that doesn't hold my interest.  This book sounds like it will appeal  to lovers of dark and spooky nights.


    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2014

    Not for everyone.

    This is a book for people who enjoy the current shows about people returning from the dead. It is a good suspense story.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 12, 2014

    Once again I have preordered a nook book and the date comes and

    Once again I have preordered a nook book and the date comes and goes and I am unable to read the book. Way to suck nook, way to suck.

    3 out of 38 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2014

    Page turner!

    McMahon delivers with a 100+ year old child disappearance & murder case, ancient ritual and unholy ground. Almost stands as a backstory to King's, Pet Semetery & "sour ground". Couldn't put it down!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2014

    An

    I really love this author having read all of her books but this one was disappointing. Let me correct myself...it was very good until the end. Then it became something typical of the times we live in right now and the movies and tv programs which feature a particular venue. Ido not want to give the end away so i am vague intentionally. Her other books are better. Start with those. The writing is good...characters good...ending seems like she wasnt sure where to take this.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 11, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    My first by Jennifer McMahon, but it won't be my last.  One of

    My first by Jennifer McMahon, but it won't be my last. 

    One of the best things about writing reviews for book and blogging is that you come across wonderful new authors that you have not read before. Established author Jennifer McMahon is a perfect example. Although The Winter People is her 7th novel, it is my first by here and I am so excited to find a new author to read. 




    One day 19-year-old Ruthie awakens to find her mother has disappeared. Ruthie lives in an old farmhouse in West Hall, Vermont with her mother Alice and her sister Fawn. The same farmhouse where Sarah Harrison Shea lived in the early 1900s with her husband and daughter Gertie. The same farmhouse where Sarah was found dead just weeks after Gertie is killed in a tragic way. 




    The book begins in 1908 when Sarah sees her first "sleeper" (a person who has died and is temporarily brought back to life). It continues through her diary which tells about her life, Gertie's death, and the aftermath. Alternate chapters tell the story of Ruthie and her sister, and the search for their missing mother. Telling the stories by alternating them can be confusing at times, but it this case Jennifer McMahon does an excellent job of weaving the two stories together seamlessly. The excellent narrative hooked me from the beginning and my curiosity to see what would happen next kept me going. 




    Although it was not apparent how the two stories connected in the beginning, this was not a problem at all. Each story was compelling and filled with just the right amount of suspense. In addition, the characters in the story were easy for me to become invested in, which also pulled me in quickly. In addition to the main characters, there were several other characters who caught my interest, including Sarah's magical "Auntie" and the wife of a photographer who disappeared while researching Sarah's life. Add to all this the inclusion of the ghostly as well as other supernatural elements that took the story to a seriously creepy level. You know, the feeling you get when someone tells a really great ghost story after dark in the summer. It certainly made me shiver several times, and not just because the story took place during a snow storm. 




    As I said above, this is the first of Jennifer McMahon's books that I have read. What I didn't say is that I have several others that I have never gotten a chance to read. That will be remedied soon. If you have never read anything by Jennifer McMahon, I recommend that you seek out her work, and The Winter People is a great place to start. I am anticipating that the rest of her books are filled with the same excellent narrative, characters, and other elements as this one. 




    Thanks to Doubleday Publishing for making the e-ARC available through Edelweiss for my review.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2014

    A fun book to read.

    This was the first book I've read by this author. I don't read many horror stories but I'm glad I read this one...I'll read another by her.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2014

    Pet Cemetery rip off

    This is creepy but really too close to King's novel to give her credit. I do like the past and present shufts though.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2014

    Spooky good!

    Spooky page turner. My first time reading a book by this author. Made me scared to sleep with the closet door open! Looking forward to trying some of her other works.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 22, 2014

    I took some time for me to really appreciate and get into the st

    I took some time for me to really appreciate and get into the story but it just kept building and the anticipation kept growing as I reached the end. I truly enjoyed this read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2014

    Great Book

    Many reviews on here tell you about the plot so I won't go into that. I will tell you that i read almost all genres & loved this novel! Rarely do I give 5 stars but this was so well written and intriguing, I had to! Initially i thought this might be a story of a woman driven insane with grief, but I was so wrong! This book just kept getting better and revealed more secrets with each page. I didn't want it to end & now i miss the characters. Perhaps i can bring them back........

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 1, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    How to Awaken a Sleeper - Are You Sure?

    A town full of secrets and myths, and spirits – visitors from “the other side”, how to awaken a “Sleeper” (ones called back from the dead). Can the dead return not only in spirit, but as a person? Once a sleeper is returned – then what? What happens within the seven days?

    The WINTER PEOPLE is a gripping novel set in Vermont, with strange disappearances. Sara Shea was found dead in the field behind her house in 1908, after the tragic death of her daughter Gertie (when she falls into a well). There were rumors that sleepers inhabited in the woods and a rock called “The Devil’s Hand.”

    Fast forward, 19 yr. old Ruthie lives in Sara’s farmhouse with her mother Alice, and her younger sister Fawn. One morning Ruthie finds Alice has vanished and begins searching for clues. She finds a copy of Sara’s diary hidden beneath the floorboards of her mother’s bedroom. Ruthie and Fawn begin to dig further into the mystery of Sara, and discovers she is not the only one searching for something lost. What is the secret? Can she stop history from repeating itself?

    Should we let those who’ve crossed over stay on the other side, no matter our selfish desire or grief to see them again?

    THE WINTER PEOPLE is told between the pages of Sara’s diary as she loved her Auntie, a woman scorned by the town except those needing a remedy and then they would visit the woods. Auntie left a secret message for Sara to open when the time was right. Is there any truth to the stories that claim that Sara's old Auntie had the power to bring the dead back to life? And that others knew the secret -- and could have used it? From the days leading to her legend to the present day ---a psychological thriller.

    I listened to the audio version, narrated by Cassandra Campbell and Kathe Mazur. The first part of the book was very slow moving and a little boring at times. The second half seemed to pick up a bit; however, finding myself wanting it to end, as not really my type of genre. Unfortunately I was never hooked nor connected.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2014

    Confusing at 1st

    BUT last couple of chapters make it worthwhile. FREAKY DEAKY!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 25, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    If you¿re looking for a book that will have you reading into the

    If you’re looking for a book that will have you reading into the wee hours of the morning, then search no further because The Winter People by Jennifer McMahon is the book for you. Set in the tiny town of West Hall, Vermont, this creepy gem bounces back and forth from the early 1900′s to present day; the common links being swift disappearances and unexplained deaths.




    The Winter People starts out telling two sides of the same story, one about a missing mother in present day and the other a missing daughter a century earlier, as told by the mother in her diary. As the book progresses, McMahon weaves a tale that reminds me of an accordion, bringing the two stories closer together and adding intrigue by pulling them apart over and over. The result in a fantastically creepy story that will both shock you and make complete sense.




    As a self-proclaimed horror-wimp, I was a little hesitant to pick this up because I heard it was creepy. In the end, I caved because everyone was talking about it and I figured I could always put it in the freezer. To be fair, in the two nights I read this book, I did check to make sure the doors were locked a few times more than necessary, closed all of the closet doors, and slept with the light on. That said, this isn’t a horror book in the traditional sense. It’s not a slasher book, nor is it a true psychological thriller. What makes it so creepy is that it taps into a type of madness that could afflict anyone consumed by grief. This, to me, is the scariest type of book.




    If you’re a mystery fan, then you must read this book. If you’re not a mystery fan but enjoy books that explore the human psyche and the walls one can build around them to avoid the truth, then this is absolutely the book for you. (Allison @ The Book Wheel)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2014

    Great page turner loved it!

    This was my first book by this author and I will certainly go back and read some more. Kept me turning the pages to see what would happen next.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 47 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)