The Wizard and the Warrior: Leading with Passion and Power

The Wizard and the Warrior: Leading with Passion and Power

by Lee G. Bolman, Terrence E. Deal
     
 

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Why a book about wizards and warriors as models for leadership? Because, as Peter Drucker once said, everything you learned is wrong—at best, it is misleading and insufficient. You typically learn in school, workshops, and seminars that if you can manage the work and serve the people, you have what it takes. It's not true. Maybe you have enough stuff to be a

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Overview

Why a book about wizards and warriors as models for leadership? Because, as Peter Drucker once said, everything you learned is wrong—at best, it is misleading and insufficient. You typically learn in school, workshops, and seminars that if you can manage the work and serve the people, you have what it takes. It's not true. Maybe you have enough stuff to be a pretty good manager, but it takes a lot more to be a good leader.

The Wizard and the Warrior gives leaders the insight and courage they need to take risks on behalf of values they cherish and the people they guide. Great leaders must act both as wizard, calling on imagination, creativity, meaning, and magic, and as warrior, mobilizing strength, courage, and willingness to fight as necessary to fulfill their mission.

Best-selling authors Lee Bolman and Terrence Deal present the defining moments and experiences of exemplary leaders such as David Neeleman (CEO of Jet Blue), Mary Kay Ash, Warren Buffet, Anne Mulcahy, Thomas Keller (head chef of French Laundry), and Abraham Lincoln—all of whom have wrested with their own inner warrior and wizard. These engaging, realistic case studies are followed by commentaries that will raise questions and suggest possibilities without rushing to resolution or simple answers.

Armed with this book's expanded repertoire of possibilities, the reader can become more versatile and imbue work and life with power and passion.

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Editorial Reviews

Soundview Executive Book Summaries

Why use wizards and warriors as models for leadership? Because, as Peter Drucker once said, everything you learned is wrong — at best, it is misleading and insufficient. You typically learn in school, workshops and seminars that if you can manage the work and serve the people, you have what it takes. It’s not true. Maybe you have enough stuff to be a pretty good manager, but it takes much more to be a good leader.

A combined dose of magic and strength can make all the difference.

This book gives leaders the insight and courage they need to take risks on behalf of values they cherish and the people they guide. Great leaders must act both as wizard, calling on imagination, creativity, meaning and magic, and as warrior, mobilizing strength, courage and willingness to fight as necessary to fulfill their mission.

Confronting the Wizard and Warrior Within
Managers are running on two cylinders — structure and people — when they need four. Two other frames — political and symbolic – are required to make sense of the rolling, moving targets that organizations serve up every day. They take us into a world dominated by power and passion. The bad news: That’s just where managers are usually weakest. We know this from research and across sectors. Inattention to these two ways of thinking and behaving is a debilitating Achilles’ heel.

Thinking on Your Feet
Wizard and warrior are roles that you can choose to play and learn to play better. Wizard and warrior images are metaphors to help you think on your feet. When, for example, you are in dangerous and highly charged political situations, what are your options? There are three kinds of warrior — toxic, relentless and principled — and four key attributes that warriors need to be successful — mind, heart, skill and weapons.

When the culture of your enterprise needs tweaking or transforming, what are your wisest moves? There are three wizardly roles — authentic, wannabe and harmful — and specific ways leaders can inspire, deflate or destroy a company. To be successful, wizards need to discover their own magic and spiritual core and then summon the collective. One must also consider conflicting forces, however.

Conflicting Forces
There are four different roles in leadership:

  1. Analysts emphasize rationality, analysis, logic, facts and data.
  2. Caregivers emphasize the importance of people and relationships.
  3. Warriors believe that managers and leaders live in a world of conflict and scarce resources.
  4. Wizards bring imagination, insight, creativity, vision, meaning and magic to the work of leadership.

The Warrior Path
Regardless of the role they play, warriors succeed through a combination of four basic ingredients: heart, mind, skill and weapons. Heart gives warriors passion, courage and persistence — it is the "fire in the belly" — that propels them forward in the face of risk, confusion, danger and obstacles. Mind gives warriors the direction and guidance to make strategic moves on life’s ever-changing chessboard, avoiding snares, ambushes and blind alleys. Skill — developed through instruction and experience — determines how well leaders read and manage people and circumstances to move their cause forward. Weapons are the armory warrior leaders employ to champion their cause.

Wizard Roles: Authentic, Wannabe and Harmful
Throughout history, people have been fascinated by the magical power of wizards and wizardry. Wizards are part of an ensemble of players who devote themselves to the mystical, symbolic aspects of a tribe or organization. Other related roles include sorcerer, magician and shaman. What sets wizards apart is captured in the root meaning, "wise." In story and legend, we find numerous examples of three wizard archetypes, personified in the Lord of the Rings trilogy by Sauron, Gollum and Gandalf.

The Leader’s Journey: Fusing Warrior And Wizard
The wizard relies more heavily on magic and mystery, the warrior on strength and skill. These two distinct ways were personified in ancient Japan by the ninja, who relied on subtlety and artfulness, and the samurai, who emphasized power and physical prowess. But there was also strength in the ninja and some magic in the samurai. Copyright © 2006 Soundview Executive Book Summaries

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780787974138
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
03/31/2006
Series:
J-B US non-Franchise Leadership Series, #12
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
445,750
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.10(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"Truly something novel and useful among the current books on contemporary leadership. Bolman and Deal have again created a book that is both a conceptual gem and a handy practical reference. The Wizard and the Warrior will make us think carefully again about leadership in general and about our own style in particular."
—Walter F. Ulmer Jr., lieutenant general, U.S. Army (Ret.), former president and CEO, Center for Creative Leadership

"With The Wizard and the Warrior Lee Bolman and Terry Deal have followed up the insights of Reframing Organizations with a grounded and entertaining set of very useful stories. The numerous examples of historical and contemporary figures and their life stories serve to bring  leadership ideas alive in a way that few books achieve.  A great and useful read!"
—Len Schlesinger, vice chairman and chief operating officer, Limited Brands

"Rarely do scholars attempt, let alone succeed as Bolman and Deal have done so palpably, to encompass the polarities of leadership. They have thrown their arms around the inspirational, on one hand, and the tough, practical, and sometimes brutal, on the other. Through wonderful stories, they convincingly illustrate the real challenges and possibilities of living life grounded by larger purposes and the courage to interrogate reality. Anyone practicing leadership, or dreaming of doing so, should read this book."
—Ronald A. Heifetz, King Hussein Bin Talal Lecturer in Public Leadership co-founder, Center for Public Leadership, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University; author of Leadership Without Easy Answers and Leadership on the Line

"Terry Deal and Lee Bolman have established the ‘gold standard’ for looking at leadership. In The Wizard and Warrior they show how to integrate the two sides of leadership. It is about fighting the good fight, but not losing sight of the magic-it is about making the word flesh. This is a must-read for anyone who cares about becoming a better leader."
—Paul D. Houston, executive director, American Association of School Administrators

"Warriors and wizards! Craxy metaphors for leaders? No! Compelling insights that Bolman and Deal have distilled compelling insights from organizational life, illustrating them with fascinating stories. They convinced me that we as leaders can achieve our mission and care for our people more effectively by embracing the reality of combat and magic, of power and spirit, in our organizations. If you’re a good leader, this book will make you better."
—Colonel Larry R. Donnithorne, author, The West Point Way of Leadership: From Learning Principled Leadership to Practicing It

"I find The Wizard and Warrior a fascinating and enjoyable read. The premise is exactly what it set out to be, a prod and a guide to trumpet the true legacy of leadership. The self-inventory guidelines stimulate an interesting integration of fantasy and myth (through Harry Potter’s Dumbledore, Merlin of King Arthur’s court, and Tolkein’s Gandalf) with the realities of business tycoons such as Oprah Winfrey, Herb Kelleher, and Mary Kay Ash, as well as the political wizard of U.S. presidents. The book provokes the reader to understand the immeasurable potential of the wizard and warrior in each of us that can create change and challenge."
—John Keola Lake, kumu-in-residence, Chaminade University of Honolulu, Hawai'I, head of Hawaiian traditions

"This book is a must-read for all who are pursuing the journey of leadership. It provides in-depth insight into passion and power, and how they are the very essence of leadership.  It will be of great value for all those in leadership positions at J.E. Dunn."
—Terrence P. Dunn, chief executive officer, J.E. Dunn Construction Company

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