The Wolves of Midwinter (Wolf Gift Chronicles Series #2)

( 87 )

Overview

The tale of THE WOLF GIFT continues . . .

In Anne Rice's surprising and compelling best-selling novel, the first of her strange and mythic imagining of the world of wolfen powers ("I devoured these pages . . . As solid and engaging as anything she has written since her early vampire chronicle fiction" —Alan Cheuse, The Boston Globe; "A delectable cocktail of old-fashioned lost-race adventure, shape-shifting and suspense" —Elizabeth Hand, The Washington Post), readers were ...

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Overview

The tale of THE WOLF GIFT continues . . .

In Anne Rice's surprising and compelling best-selling novel, the first of her strange and mythic imagining of the world of wolfen powers ("I devoured these pages . . . As solid and engaging as anything she has written since her early vampire chronicle fiction" —Alan Cheuse, The Boston Globe; "A delectable cocktail of old-fashioned lost-race adventure, shape-shifting and suspense" —Elizabeth Hand, The Washington Post), readers were spellbound as Rice imagined a daring new world set against the wild and beckoning California coast.

Now in her new novel, as lush and romantic in detail and atmosphere as it is sleek and steely in storytelling, Anne Rice brings us once again to the rugged coastline of Northern California, to the grand mansion at Nideck Point—to further explore the unearthly education of her transformed Man Wolf.

The novel opens on a cold, gray landscape. It is the beginning of December. Oak fires are burning in the stately flickering hearths of Nideck Point. It is Yuletide. For Reuben Golding, now infused with the wolf gift and under the loving tutelage of the Morphenkinder, this Christmas promises to be like no other . . . as he soon becomes aware that the Morphenkinder, steeped in their own rituals, are also celebrating the Midwinter Yuletide festival deep within Nideck forest.

From out of the shadows of the exquisite mansion comes a ghost—tormented, imploring, unable to speak yet able to embrace and desire with desperate affection . . . As Reuben finds himself caught up with the passions and yearnings of this spectral presence and the preparations for the Nideck town Christmas reach a fever pitch, astonishing secrets are revealed, secrets that tell of a strange netherworld, of spirits—centuries old—who possess their own fantastical ancient histories and taunt with their dark, magical powers . . .

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  • The Wolves of Midwinter
    The Wolves of Midwinter  

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

With this standalone sequel to The Wolf Chronicles, we return to the Northern California coastline retreat of Nideck Point where Reuben Golding continues to wrestle with adjustments to his new life as a Man Wolf. Under the guidance of his mentor, he is now ready to be initiated into the Midwinter Yuletide rituals of the Morphenkinder that take place deep in the nearby forest. But all is not tranquil in this strange new world: The arrival of a restless ghostly spirit and gathering dark mysteries signal that the wolf gift carries with it unexpected dangers. Bound to be a bestseller.

Publishers Weekly
08/26/2013
Reuben Golding is a new werewolf (following the events of 2012’s The Wolf Gift). He now lives in a Northern California mansion with his mentor, Felix, and other shapeshifters, occasionally killing evildoers as the vigilante called Man Wolf. Readers expecting urban fantasy action will be surprised: this is mostly a moody family drama, as Reuben plans for the birth of his child by his ex-girlfriend Celeste and copes with the transformation of his new lover, Laura, into a shapeshifter. Reuben and his brother, Father Jim, a priest, also struggle with issues of faith, justice, and the afterlife. Meanwhile, Felix plans a giant Christmas celebration for the entire village and frets about his ghostly niece, Marchent. New conflicts and antagonists are introduced and dealt with in a late rush, and Reuben’s forays as Man Wolf are perfunctory, taking up fewer pages than the party planning. Still, the book is not without charm: Reuben and Felix are sympathetic protagonists, and the series mythology, suggesting that the fair folk may be evolved human ghosts, is fascinating. (Oct.)
From the Publisher
"Anne Rice is back with the bad guys."
                              -Library Journal

"Her wolves are worth catching up to."
                              -Alan Cheuse, NPR

"Her books are scary and mysterious and mystical, filled with thrills and danger, frightening fun, and ardent passion."
                              -R. L. Stine

"The series mythology is fascinating."
                              -Publisher's Weekly

"Fans will welcome Rice's return to the realm of eccentric immortal predators."
                              -Kirkus

Kirkus Reviews
2013-09-01
Second in Rice's series (The Wolf Gift, 2012) featuring a cultured pack of do-gooder werewolves. Reuben, a newly minted Man Wolf, has moved into the Northern California mansion he inherited from the lovely, mysterious and now late Marchent. The mansion, situated in a vast woodland, is also home to several older (in some cases ancient) men who are, when the occasion requires, werewolves. Among these "Distinguished Gentlemen" are Marchent's uncle Felix, a giant named Sergei, the well-mannered Thibault, and the leader and conscience of the pack, Margon. The Gentleman are inducting the beginner werewolves, including Stuart, a young gay man, and Reuben's latest ladylove, Laura, into new, immortal life. The group is preparing for a gala Christmas party they hope to make an annual tradition. The party will be followed by the midwinter rites, which the werewolves (known as Morphenkinder) have celebrated since time immemorial and which, in some packs, involves human sacrifice. Not Margon's pack, however. His men (and women) wolves have a special instinct for sniffing out and mauling evildoers, particularly those who abuse and molest children. In fact, one night, after Reuben's wolf persona emerges involuntarily, he rescues a kidnapped little girl, then devours most of her captor. The Gentlemen must put the public off the scent of their true identities, whence the party. But Reuben's human entanglements pose complications. Marchent, who was murdered, is haunting Reuben, and Felix must enlist the aid of another supernatural group, the Forest Gentry, a kind of ethereal, chamois-clad tribe, to entice her troubled spirit away from the house. Reuben's hated ex-girlfriend is about to give birth to his baby, and his father has decided to temporarily move into the mansion, where he will be the only resident who is not only mortal, but not privy to the werewolves' secret. This complex fantasy world relies on an elaborate substructure of lore and history, and the action slows as points of exposition are repetitiously belabored. Fans will welcome Rice's return to the realm of eccentric immortal predators.
From the Publisher
"Anne Rice is back with the bad guys."
                              -Library Journal

"Her wolves are worth catching up to."
                              -Alan Cheuse, NPR

"Her books are scary and mysterious and mystical, filled with thrills and danger, frightening fun, and ardent passion."
                              -R. L. Stine

"The series mythology is fascinating."
                              -Publisher's Weekly

"Fans will welcome Rice's return to the realm of eccentric immortal predators."
                              -Kirkus

Library Journal
09/01/2013
Rice, in her signature elegantly descriptive style, does not disappoint in this follow-up to 2012's The Wolf Gift, slowly doling out details about recurring characters like an hourglass, one grain at a time. Since being attacked by and subsequently turned into a werewolf, Reuben has found a home in a mansion on the Northern California coast with a cultured group of other Morphenkinder. As he prepares to celebrate his first Midwinter, a lavish Christmas party is planned for the whole town. Humans, unaware of their fellow guests' lupine secret, enjoy the grandiose party until the festivities end in a violent fight with a group of rival wolves. Meanwhile, Reuben struggles with building his new werewolf life while keeping his family close. He is sensitive and prefers to use his wolf gift to protect and defend others, even at the risk of exposing his secret. VERDICT Future conflict with the rival wolves, Reuben's family, and authorities are themes Rice devotees will eagerly anticipate in a third installment. The author's richly detailed vignettes and Victorian overtones will please fans of The Witching Hour, while readers interested in supernatural lore without heavy romance or graphically violent plotlines will want to follow this series. [See Prepub Alert, 4/29/13.]—Amanda Scott, Cambridge Springs P.L., PA
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385349963
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/15/2013
  • Series: Wolf Gift Chronicles Series , #2
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 26,261
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Meet the Author

ANNE RICE is the author of thirty-two books. She lives in Palm Desert, California.
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    1. Also Known As:
      A. N. Roquelaure, Anne Rampling
    2. Hometown:
      Palm Desert, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      October 4, 1941
    2. Place of Birth:
      New Orleans, Louisiana
    1. Education:
      B.A., San Francisco State University, 1964; M.A., 1971
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Two a.m.

The house slept.

Reuben came down the stairs in his slippers and heavy wool robe.

Jean Pierre, who often took the night shift, was sleeping on his folded arms at the kitchen counter.

The fire in the library was not quite out.

Reuben stirred it, brought it back to life, and took a book from the shelves and did something he had always wanted to do. He curled up in the window seat against the cold window, comfortable enough on the velvet cushions, with a throw pillow between him and the damp chill panes.

The rain was flooding down the glass only inches from his eyes.

The lamp on the desk was sufficient for him to read a little. And a little, in this dim uncommitted light, was all he wanted to read.

It was a book on the ancient Near East. It seemed to Reuben he cared passionately about it, about the whole question of where some momentous anthropological development had occurred, but he lost the thread almost at once. He put his head back against the wood paneling and he stared through narrow eyes at the small dancing flames on the hearth.

Some errant wind blasted the panes. The rain hit the glass like so many tiny pellets. And then there came that sighing of the house that Reuben heard so often when he was alone like this and perfectly still.

He felt safe and happy, and eager to see Laura, eager to do his best. His family would love the open house on the sixteenth, simply love it. Grace and Phil had never been more than casual entertainers of their closest friends. Jim would think it wonderful, and they would talk. Yes, Jim and Reuben had to talk. It wasn't merely that Jim was the only one of them who knew Reuben, knew his secrets, knew everything. It was that he was worried about Jim, worried about what the burden of the secrets was doing to him. What in God's name was Jim suffering, a priest bound by the oath of the Confessional, knowing such secrets which he could not mention to another living being? He missed Jim terribly. He wished he could call Jim now.

Reuben began to doze. He shook himself awake and pulled the soft shapeless collar of his robe close around his neck. He had a sudden "awareness" that somebody was close to him, somebody, and it was as if he'd been talking to that person, but now he was violently awake and certain this could not possibly be so.

He looked up and to his left. He expected the darkness of the night to be sealed up against the window as all the outside lights had long ago gone off.

But he saw a figure standing there, looking down at him, and he realized he was looking at Marchent Nideck, and that she was peering at him from only inches beyond the glass.

Marchent. Marchent, who had been savagely murdered in this house.

His terror was total. Yet he didn't move. He felt the terror, like something breaking out all over his skin. He continued to stare at her, resisting with all his might the urge to move away.

Her pale eyes were slightly narrow, rimmed in red, and fixing him as if she were speaking to him, imploring him in some desperate way. Her lips were slightly parted, very fresh and soft and natural. And her cheeks were reddened as if from the cold.

The sound of Reuben's heart was deafening in his ears, and so powerful in his arteries that he felt he couldn't breathe.

She wore the negligee she'd worn the night she was killed. Pearls, white silk, and the lace, how beautiful was the lace, so thick, heavy, ornate. But it was streaked with blood, caked with blood. One of her hands gripped the lace at the throat--and there was the bracelet on that wrist, the thin delicate pearl chain she'd worn that...

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Interviews & Essays

A conversation with

Anne Rice

author of

The Wolves of Midwinter

Q: It's been almost two years since The Wolf Gift was published. What has been the most fun for you about writing this new series?


A: The new cosmology is terrific fun. Since this is a brand new series, I'm able to evolve a whole new type of supernatural character—the morphenkind, or man wolf—and make up an origin story for the species and work with what powers these creatures have and so forth. I've loved that. But as always the novels are about character, and I do love the new cast—Reuben my youthful hero, his family, and the contemporary setting. As always I like blending a family story with a supernatural story. I've done this with the Mayfair Witches and to some extent with the vampires. But the very most fun? I guess the new cosmology—that Reuben the Man Wolf is a comic book hero, living a double life as a reporter and a man wolf.

Q: A defining element of your werewolves is that they are sentient during transformation, but also that they can detect and hunt out evil. How does The Wolves of Midwinter begin to blur those clear lines of good vs. evil for your main character, Reuben?


A: Well, Reuben and Stuart—both young man wolves—are coming to see the obvious, that there is no real objective standard in the world of what is good or evil, much as we all wish that there was. And in some situations, they do not see clearly what to do. They transform into powerful beast men and can easily kill and punish evil doers, but what happens when the evil doer is contrite and becomes a victim himself? Do they stop in their tracks? Their powers put an immense burden on those human beings who know what they are. Is it moral for a good man to contact Reuben and ask for his help with despicably evil murderers, knowing full well that Reuben has the power to transform into a Man Wolf and bring immediate death to the evil ones? In The Wolves of Midwinter they confront this problem for the first time.

Q: What was it about the unfinished nature of Reuben's relationship with Marchent that inspired you to bring back her ghost in The Wolves of Midwinter?


A: Marchent was a very strong character and she left the narrative early. She died violently. I thought what if she lingers, confused, uncertain, an earthbound spirit in need of guidance to the light? I think it was her character and how strong she felt to me in the first book that prompted me to bring her back. When I write I believe the old cliché: there are no small parts, only small actors. And so even if a character is going to be in a book for a very short while (as Marchent was in the first book) I'll go deep into that character, seeking to make that character very real, and then when the character is dispatched, well I miss the character. That's what happened with Marchent.

Q: The Wolves of Midwinter features the emergence of other "Ageless Ones," like the Forest Gentry, and the strange servants who serve the Distinguished Gentlemen. How do these new characters allow you build upon the werewolf mythology you've created?


A: It's flat out unrealistic to present a universe in which the morphenkinder are the only preternatural inhabitants. It's a failure of imagination to not ponder what other supernatural or preternatural beings they might know or interact with. I thought it only natural that immortal morphenkinder would know a lot about spirits, ghosts, and so forth, and other immortals. It was fun to imagine new species. And I love writing about ghosts. I am doing it in other books now as well as in The Wolf Gift Chronicles. I have a mythology of ghosts and spirits that transcends any individual series I've written and I just love it. With Reuben and his friends, I feel like I'm just getting started on their world. I may bring in other elements soon. For now though the Forest Gentry and the "strange servants" are really delighting me.

Q: The Wolves of Midwinter also introduces new members of other werewolf packs, suggesting a much larger world exists beyond the Distinguished Gentlemen. Will we learn more about the past history of the Morphenkinder as the series continues?


A: Yes, as the series continues we will learn much more about the history of the Morphenkinder. I already have a big surprise brewing for book three. And of course we have only begun to see in this second book how morphenkinder from other parts of the world can make serious trouble for Reuben, Felix, Margon and the inhabitants of Nideck Point. I feel that in these two Wolf Gift books I've opened many doors and I want this to develop into a huge fantasy series.

Q: So much of the setting and atmosphere of The Wolves of Midwinter is tied to traditional Christmas holiday rituals. What experiences and research did you draw from to create such a rich setting? Were you inspired by European holiday festivals? What was your favorite part of creating the Festival in Nideck Point?


A: I am enthralled with Yuletide customs the world over but particularly those of Europe and America. I did intensely research them, seeking for material everywhere. I have used intense Christmas symbols and mythology in The Witching Hour and in Lasher, and I am very interested, as you can see, in delving into it with the wolves. I am intrigued as to why our heritage includes belief in ghosts walking at Christmastime and so many Christmas ghost stories, like those written in Victorian England, for instance. I'm intrigued with the ancient European custom of people dressing as beasts and in animal skins around Christmastime—with customs involving bonfires and echoes of human sacrifice. Clearly the feast of midwinter was serious business in our past, a time when we celebrated the cycles of the earth, the desperate hope that the warm spring and summer sun would return, in spite of the ice and snows, and that we would see light and growth and possibility again. That's in our blood as human beings. And to me all this is related to the very idea of the man wolves—that we humans remember on some level when we were very primitive and closer to the animal world than we are today, that our nature is always animal and divine mixed together, that we are mammals with souls. Christmas is the great feast at the very heart of our cultural experience of these mysteries. God becoming man in the Christ Child in the dark of winter is a potent symbol for all of us—human beings who are spiritual as well as physical—and for our great need to control our animal nature while never forgetting it.

Q: By contrast, the Yuletide ritual of the werewolves is much more pagan and primitive. Did you know that scene would be such a climax of the book when you started? Or did you discover its power as you were writing?


A: Yes, I started out with the idea of exploring how the wolves would celebrate the pagan feast of midwinter as well as the Christmas feast of midwinter. I have introduced characters who are immortals, one of whom at least was born long before the Christian era, and I wanted to see how as a tribe the morphenkinder would honor this ancient and evolving feast of Yule.

Q: How does technology play a role in a series where your hero Reuben is a young reporter grappling with an ancient transformation? Is it challenging to fuse the contemporary aspects of Reuben's life (his iPhone, laptop, etc.) with the timelessness of the Chrism?


A: If Reuben is to be believable as a contemporary reporter he has to be involved with technology. I have to ask myself, how would he use all the technological devices we have today in confronting the Wolf Gift? It's only natural that he would photograph himself in transformation with his iPhone, and look up werewolves on the web, and of course write down his thoughts on his computer. It would be a failure of imagination to try to present some atmospheric gothic world today in which technology doesn't exist. We supernatural writers have to meet the challenges of today in writing our stories. I love the gothic atmosphere of Nideck Point, the gothic aspects of Christmas, but to present a quaint world without flat screen TVs, or desk top computer or iPhones, would just be ridiculous and shallow. I believe that great gothic stories can be told today as well as ever and that referencing all our technological advances can be done with no sacrifice of romance or gothic thrills.

Q: Can you give us a hint for things to look forward to in the next book in The Wolf Gift Chronicles?


A: It's too early for me to say. Right now I'm thinking a lot about Sergei, the Russian man wolf, and about Stuart, the young gay man wolf, but I'm not sure where the story will go. I do think it might involve more chunks of time, much more travel, more conflict and so on. And I have not forgotten little Suzie Blakely or Pastor George, two key characters in The Wolves of Midwinter. We might hear more from them too. Reuben is in a real world, and it is a world filled with potential trouble and potential adventure.

Q: What have been your favorite reactions from fans about your return to the gothic?


A: Naturally I love their enthusiasm for the characters and the storytelling. I love that readers are willing to follow me into something wholly new. I've published over thirty books and there are always flattering requests for old characters and old stories to continue. But I treasure the response of those who are delighted with something fresh and contemporary.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 87 )
Rating Distribution

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(50)

4 Star

(18)

3 Star

(12)

2 Star

(6)

1 Star

(1)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 87 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2013

    So different

    I never read vampires or werewolves or shapeshifter. etc. Do not even know what ever made me pick it up. I am now reading it for the second time. Immediately after the first time. Thats how ,not only was it a different rendition ,but it and the gothic home and all the people who lived there were fasinating. Makes it so you wish to be part of it. Going back to get the wolf gift. Wish for more. Am a sr citizen and it encouraged me instead of scaring me. Although kinda do wish it was true and could rid nook readers of these 'children' who write these stupid messages to each other. The ones who pretend they are
    some type of animal. They take up space. Dont understand why barnes and noble dosn't do something so we are not subjected to them. Have them go 'purr' to facebook. Only then they would be identified which they dont want. They, themselves, know how stupid they sound.

    10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2013

    If you love the Vampire Chronicles you probably won't like these

    If you love the Vampire Chronicles you probably won't like these books. Very religious, very preachy, overwritten,(where was the editor)? Just not good enough for Anne Rice fans!

    9 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2013

    No Way This book

    No Way This book reads like a mundane exploration of how to decorate, with very little else going on, once you get passed all the foolish endless descriptions of the surrounding's very little is really going on.

    6 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2013

    So-so

    I liked The Wolf gift, but did not love it. So-so.
    It was so long between release dates I.had to.skim through The Wolf Gift again. She even added "The Story So Far" in the beginning of this book. Anne Rice just did not get it this time. I tried to love it, I really did. I like novels that make me think "what if". These Wolf Gift novels were so Unbelieveable it wasn't any fun. It 's hard to explain. Just not real good. DM

    6 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2013

    Loved it, great story line.  Different from Rice's typical writi

    Loved it, great story line.  Different from Rice's typical writing style, but very enjoyable reading.

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 31, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    The Wolves of Midwinter: The Wolf Gift Chronicles (The Wolf Gift

    The Wolves of Midwinter: The Wolf Gift Chronicles (The Wolf Gift Chronicles #2) by Anne Rice

    The Wolves of Midwinter once again takes place in Northern California, in the mansion at Nideck Point. After his attack in the first novel, Reuben Golding is continuing to learn what it is to be Morphenkinder or Man Wolf with help from his housemates the distinguished gentleman. 

    Fellow Morphenkinder and previous owner of Nideck Point, Felix Nideck, is excitingly heading the plans for the Midwinter Yuletide rituals that coincide with Christmas. 

    Meanwhile, Reuban begins to see the ghost of Marchent Nideck, who was murdered by her brothers in the first book, The Wolf Gift. Felix and Reuben are anguished that Marchent has not moved on and enlist the help of the Forest Gentry.

    There are other sub-stories that take place, but I don’t want to reveal any spoilers. I will say that the beginning of the novel is more reflective, and the end of the story is more action packed. 

    The whole time I read this book, I felt it would be better if it was closer to Christmas. It was still good, but it seemed odd reading a book that is discussing getting ready to celebrate the Yuletide in the middle of summer. Plus, just like Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol this book contains ghost and contemplation of one’s past. This is the type of book that will make you reflect upon your own life. Anne Rice does not disappoint with her eloquent writing style. The Wolves of Midwinter is a well written, thought-provoking novel.

    ARC provided by publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2013

    This 2nd installment is not as fleshed out, nor as engaging, as

    This 2nd installment is not as fleshed out, nor as engaging, as the first Wolf Chronicles novel. It does, however, offer up some of Rice's most descriptive - and atmospheric - writing in a long time. Her descriptions of winter festivals and rituals, and her sections about ancient, pre-Christian winter celebrations, stand out amidst writing that is, at other times,.disappointing. the novel feels at times as if it was rushed to publication in time for the holiday book selling season. As a fun, sometimes ethereal, holiday read, however, it succeeds, even if it doesn't excel.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2013

    I loved this book ! had to read it all at once, the characters a

    I loved this book ! had to read it all at once, the characters are fascinating and fully believable. After reading it i thought about it for a 
    couple of days, then i had to read it again,could not get   it out of my mind . Thank you for this gift of the wolf gift . I will definitely await
    (somewhat impatiently i fear) for the next books in the series 

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2013

    Anne Rice is back with wolf-fever!

    I devoured both of the wolf books. The characters are so real & their life experiences incredible. I am really hoping for another book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2013

    Anne Rice does it again!

    Epic. Loved it.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2013

    Awesome book

    Anne rice does it again epic

    2 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2013

    All around a Great book

    A whole different kind of book from Anne! Myst read, beautifully written with wonderful characters.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2013

    Must Read for series continuity!

    Not as fast paced as her first "wolf" book. Introduces many characters and provides background for future books in series. Slow in many places and maybe a bit too fantastic. Time will tell as she develops the series. Reminds me of Lestat in many ways.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2013

    Awsome

    Great book!

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2014

    Excellent sequel

    Anne Rice continues to be a great writer ... great sequel!

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  • Posted April 25, 2014

    Highly recommend such a good read!

    I love this second book in this series, really interesting story line. Holds you from the start.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2014

    Very Good

    I really enjoyed these two books. They were both good...hope she adds more to the series

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2014

    To star

    Go to olden days res one

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2014

    Need pack

    Star too moons gray w blue eyes no mate

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  • Posted February 16, 2014

    I was disappointed in this second book as compared to the first

    I was disappointed in this second book as compared to the first one. The main character was a bore and not the exciting wolf hunter I was expecting after the first book.

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