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The Woman Who Spilled Words All over Herself: How to Write the Zona Rosa Way
     

The Woman Who Spilled Words All over Herself: How to Write the Zona Rosa Way

by Daniell
 
Rosemary Daniell, best known for her controversial memoirs "Sleeping with Soldiers" and "Fatal Flowers", shares what she has discovered as a poet and author. For more than 15 years, Daniell has led creative writing workshops for adults, school children, mental patients, and prisoners.

Overview

Rosemary Daniell, best known for her controversial memoirs "Sleeping with Soldiers" and "Fatal Flowers", shares what she has discovered as a poet and author. For more than 15 years, Daniell has led creative writing workshops for adults, school children, mental patients, and prisoners.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Cahners\\Publishers_Weekly
Zona Rosa is the Savannah creative writing workshop that poet and writer Daniell started for women 15 years ago. The workshop eventually began accepting men who, "no matter how masculine they might appear to be, found it acceptable to be part of a group led by a woman." Her occasional forays into women-as-victim territory aside, Daniell's account of the writing life is well worth the time. In addition to very useful writing tips and plenty of encouragement, readers are bound to come away with the sense that the author is one heck of a fascinating person. Daniell has more sides than a cut-crystal prism: she's the daughter (of an alcoholic father and a suicidal mother), the devoted mother, the wife (of four different men), the "sexual and emotional adventuress," the one-time heavy drinker, the teacher, the feminist, the amateur analyst and, of course, the writer. For Daniell, writing is on a par with breathing-"It heals, it empowers, it organizes, it beautifies"-and she can't help but share her passion. Much of the second half of the book is devoted to stories of her students and their successes-which ranged from simply finishing a project to getting published. These stories sing, and from them one gets the sense that Daniell is the kind of teacher any budding writer would be fortunate to know.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Zona Rosa is the Savannah creative writing workshop that poet and writer Daniell started for women 15 years ago. The workshop eventually began accepting men who, "no matter how masculine they might appear to be, found it acceptable to be part of a group led by a woman." Her occasional forays into women-as-victim territory aside, Daniell's account of the writing life is well worth the time. In addition to very useful writing tips and plenty of encouragement, readers are bound to come away with the sense that the author is one heck of a fascinating person. Daniell has more sides than a cut-crystal prism: she's the daughter (of an alcoholic father and a suicidal mother), the devoted mother, the wife (of four different men), the "sexual and emotional adventuress," the one-time heavy drinker, the teacher, the feminist, the amateur analyst and, of course, the writer. For Daniell, writing is on a par with breathing"It heals, it empowers, it organizes, it beautifies"and she can't help but share her passion. Much of the second half of the book is devoted to stories of her students and their successeswhich ranged from simply finishing a project to getting published. These stories sing, and from them one gets the sense that Daniell is the kind of teacher any budding writer would be fortunate to know. (May)
Library Journal
Zona Rosa, Spanish for the "pink zone," is the name that writer and teacher Daniell (Sleeping with Soldiers, LJ 12/84) gave to a creative writing workshop she directs for women (and sometimes men) in Savannah, Georgia. The gatherings are a mixture of Composition 101 classes, therapy sessions, (Appendix A lists Zona Rosa writing "exorcises"), and white-wine klatches (the group's favorite hors d'oeuvres recipes appear in Appendix C). In her latest memoir, Daniell explains how learning to write enabled her to overcome the repressiveness of growing up in a disturbed family and of being female in the traditional South. With feminist zeal, she proclaims that writing "heals," "empowers," "organizes," "beautifies," and "changes" lives. Offering a blend of writing guidelines and sexual politics, this liberated and irrepressible belle assures her audience that it's possible to conquer writer's block and become less of a victim, simultaneously. Recommended for general readers and beginning writers who could benefit from a self-help approach.Carol McAllister, Coll. of William & Mary Lib., Williamsburg, Va.
Kirkus Reviews
A straightforward chronicle—part memoir, part upbeat how-to—of how writing and teaching became entwined in the author's life as leader of Zona Rosa, a Savannah, Ga., writers' group.

A self-described "controversial" author, Daniell (The Hurricane Season, 1992, etc.) concedes that the frank sensuality and wildness of her published poems, memoirs, and fiction may have inhibited their success. In chapters with titles like "How I Wrote My Heart Out & How You Can Too" and "Writing in the Pink Zone, or How I Became Zona Rosa," she explains her attempts to cultivate the untamed in her own consciousness, and her encouragement of her students to do the same, to develop a "passionate nature." Daniell notes that, even as a young mother washing diapers at the laundromat and purchasing groceries on credit, she always sensed that language would save her. She alludes to a dark period between marriages when pleasures of the flesh had come to dominate her life. Finally, at the age when her mother had killed herself, Daniell found salvation from her "potential narcissism . . . the creeping dark of a life without limits" in teaching. In delineating the objectives of Zona Rosa—named after a Mexico City red-light district—and the experiences of its members (at first women only; men were later allowed to join) over the years, Daniell celebrates the power of the feminine, the intuitive, arguing that writers must not only support one another in their efforts but respect their own choices and material. Appendices include "exorcises," special exercises developed for Zona Rosa. A grouping of favorite workshop recipes ("Melinda's Blintz Muffins," "Claire's Southern Comfort Cake") rounds out this hybrid work.

A lively primer for beginning writers and for writing teachers, and a further demonstration of the unique nature of the "southern literary woman."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780571199068
Publisher:
Faber and Faber
Publication date:
03/01/1997
Pages:
216
Product dimensions:
5.79(w) x 8.55(h) x 0.95(d)

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