The Word: Welsh Witchcraft, The Grail of Immortality And The Sacred Keys [NOOK Book]

Overview

THE WORD: Welsh Witchcraft and America

By Rhuddlwm Gawr, Taliesin Enion Vawr, & Merridden Gawr.

Introduction by Sarah ...
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The Word: Welsh Witchcraft, The Grail of Immortality And The Sacred Keys

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Overview

THE WORD: Welsh Witchcraft and America

By Rhuddlwm Gawr, Taliesin Enion Vawr, & Merridden Gawr.

Introduction by Sarah Llewellyn

Book Three of The Quest Trilogy



Many avid readers have awaited publication of The Word, part three of the Quest Trilogy. This is the most comprehensive book ever published on the practice of Welsh Witchcraft, and is one of the few books that teaches the basic spirituality of the Craft. It discloses why and how Welsh Witchcraft began. It reveals the religious practices and explains the mysteries of the magical rituals. It demonstrates initiation and guides the reader through that ritual as well as the arcane teachings. The Word establishes the claim that Welsh Witchcraft is a remnant of the ancient religion of Hyperborea and Atlantis.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781462095759
  • Publisher: iUniverse, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 12/11/2002
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 684
  • Sales rank: 358,981
  • File size: 6 MB

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    The Word is an excellent Advanced Welsh Witchcraft Text

    First, I am not one to be taken in by the Welsh Nationalist extremists, by the nasty people who seem to dislike the author, or by con artists or shysters, including those who warned me not to read this book. So I did a great deal of research over the past months since first reading a used copy of this book. I have also looked at the documents and information generated by Taliesin einion vawr and Gerald Gardner. I have also explored Barddas and other documents written by Old Iolo. I have researched the bards of Prince Llewelyn (which this book is supposedly based upon). I have explored the University of Wales Library in Cardiff and in Aberstwyth. The following is a summary of the results of my research: 1) Llewelyns Bards were descendants of Druids. 2) Llewelyn was favorably drawn to Druidism 3) there is evidence that Llewelyn was a Knights Templar 4) There is evidence that his wife was a member of a mystery organization in France. 5) I found out who Taliesin enion Vawr was and where he was born. 6) I found out who Sarah (Rhuddlwm Gawrs teacher was 7) I interviewed a member of Dynion Mwyn in Cardiff Wales who witnessed Rhuddlwm Gawrs initiation 8) I actually visited the area near Betws-y-coed where Rhuddlwm met his teachers. AND found it at the direction of a member from Cardiff. It is not quite as recognizable as it is in the book, but I believe that could be because of the long period of time between Rhuddlwm Gawr's Welsh experience and when this book was written. Does it contain some similarities to Gardnerian practices. Of course. Most Witchcraft in Wales/Scotland/Cornwall comes from similar backgrounds. I looked at the Witchcraft that was practiced as late as the 1600s, that which was practiced in the 1800s and that which survived even into the 1900s. It is all very similar in its practice. This Book is no exception. Read it for the story of someone who became drawn into the Craft and "Old Religion" as the Americans say.

    This book is an inspired work of NON-fiction, but I am sure the Wiccans will attack it, the Christians will attack it, and the "Welsh Nationalist Critics will attack it. Don't listen to them. Listen to your heart as you read excerpts from it. It is not only neat, it is valuable as a good introduction to how a family tradition is practiced. In fact, its story has been copied by a great number of "Initiates" who claim to be Welsh Witches" but only read the book. Great Read!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 20, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Best and at this time ONLY accurate book describing Welsh Witchcraft

    I was born near Cardiff in Wales. I have spent a good part of my life traveling the world and have a better than average understanding of Witchcraft and the Occult. When I first came in contact with Dynion Mwyn I was 20 years old and a novice in the ways of the craft. Since then I have also been initiated into Gardnerian and Alexandrian styles of the Craft and continue my studies in Dynion Mwyn. Although a little pricey, The Word is one of those books that if you only had a choice of three books to take with you when marooned on a deserted Island, would certainly be one of those three. It is accurate. Those that criticize it have not read it, or have a vested interest in trashing it. The series of books written by Rhuddlwm Gawr are certainly a "must have" for any complete pagan library. When I first came in contact with Dynion Mwyn I was skeptical of their claims which I subsequently found to be totally based in fact. You will find Magick there. You will find Religion there. And you will find The Truth. And remember the law of three: What goes forth in gwron, plynedd and arawn come back in threes. Wiccans sometimes refer to the three fold return when trying to describe it. You simply MUST get yourself a copy of this book...A Gwyddon High Priestess.

    Blessed be

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2008

    Wicca All the Way

    I was VERY disappointed in this book and it's accompanying others by same author(s). It called itself "Witchcraft". Harry Potter was more believable. High Priestessess and Priests, we little folk having to get their permission to do spellwork? Different levels of initiation? I don't think our ancestors got permission to be cunningfolk or witches had to pass levels to work the Arte. This book is totally wicca, just glorified. The Three Fold Law and Karma indeed.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2003

    FINALLY

    This is one of those books that just cries to be read. I bought a copy in 1992 and subsequently it was stolen. I have looked in vain for a copy since. This is the most comprehensive book which describes Welsh Witchcraft. It is not another "me-to" book. It doesn't use a lot of fluffy bunny pagan terminology and wiccan fantasy. This is Witchcraft. Thank you for re-printing it!!!!

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