×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Word Lover's Delight: Awesome Adjectives, Nifty Nouns and Vibrant Verbs to Make Your Vocabulary Sizzle
     

The Word Lover's Delight: Awesome Adjectives, Nifty Nouns and Vibrant Verbs to Make Your Vocabulary Sizzle

by Kensington (Produced by), Captivate Network Staff (Contribution by)
 

See All Formats & Editions

Word Up!

From amusia to xerophagy, from the ephemeral to the vituperative, The Word Lover's Delight is chockablock with words that are not only fascinating and unusual but that you can use in your everyday speech—to jaw-dropping effect. With a wide range of words, from the moderately difficult to the somewhat

Overview

Word Up!

From amusia to xerophagy, from the ephemeral to the vituperative, The Word Lover's Delight is chockablock with words that are not only fascinating and unusual but that you can use in your everyday speech—to jaw-dropping effect. With a wide range of words, from the moderately difficult to the somewhat ostentatious, The Word Lover's Delight gives each word a phonetic pronunciation, a memorable example of its use in speech, and an easy-to-understand definition.

FOURSQUARE (ADJ.)

FAWR'-SKWAIR � straightforward, blunt, unwavering

Lucy appreciated Tom's foursquare breakup style, but she still popped all his tires and smashed his windshield.

Fun, educational, and erudite, The Word Lover's Delight is the ultimate book for word nerds—and anyone who's ever just wanted to find the perfect bon mot at the perfect time.

Capitvate™ elevator television reaches 52 million people a month—and Captivate's most popular feature is "Word of the Day." Now, the Captivate™ editors have put together a word-of-the-day book for everyone who wants to improve his or her vocabulary—or just loves learning new words.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780806531199
Publisher:
Kensington
Publication date:
07/01/2009
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.30(d)

Read an Excerpt

THE WORD LOVER'S DELIGHT

Awesome Adjectives, Nifty Nouns, and Vibrant Verbs to Make Your Vocabulary Sizzle

CITADEL PRESS

Copyright © 2009 Captivate Network, a Division of Gannett Satellite Information Network
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-8065-3119-9


Chapter One

A

abasia

(n.) uh-BEY-zhuh-unable to walk because muscle coordination is impaired

The governor was seen by the public only in a wheelchair due to abasia.

ablation

(n.) a-BLEY-shuhn-surgical removal of a part of the body

The fifty-nine-year-old smoker had radio-frequency ablation of her lung cancer tumors.

aborning

(adv.) uh-BOR-ning-while being born

The young company almost died aborning because of poor management.

abrogate

(v.) AB-roh-gayt-to do away with

The nation's leader threatened to abrogate the border agreement with the neighboring country.

abscission

(n.) ab-SIZH-un-the cutting off of something

The barber performed an abscission on Jim's unsightly ponytail.

absquatulate

(v.) ab-SQUAT-u-late-to leave quickly

The thunderstorm spooked the horse to break the fence and absquatulate.

abstemious

(adj.) ab-STEE-mi-ous-eating in moderation or with restraint

Jane's abstemious diet at a lunchmeeting annoyed her co-workers.

abstruse

(adj.) ab-STROOS-hard to comprehend

He was confounded by the abstruse tax documents.

abulia

(n.) uh-BOO-lee-uh-inability to make decisions

The first symptom of the CEO's mental breakdown was his abulia at the workplace.

accumbent

(adj.) uh-KUM-bunt-reclining

The accumbent flowers overflowed from the pot while taking in the sun.

acerbic

(adj.) ah-SUR-bik-harsh in tone

Alan's acerbic comments made Corrin cry.

achromatopsia

(n.) ah-kroh-muh-TOP-see-uh-color blindness

People with achromatopsia can only perceive black, white, and shades of gray.

acouasm

(n.) ah-KOO-az-uhm-ringing in the ears

Art had severe acouasm the day after the concert.

addle

(v.) AD-l-to confuse, befuddle

Too much eggnog addled her thinking.

adoxography

(n.) ah-DOKS-O-gruh-fee-good writing about a trivial topic

Adam, a master of adoxography, writes in his blog on a daily basis.

adscititious

(adj.) ad-si-TISH-uhs-not inherent; coming from an outside source

After studying abroad for a year, Alan brought home new, adscititious behaviors.

adumbrate

(v.) a-DUHM-breyt-to vaguely foreshadow

The entire future of the company was adumbrated in the report.

afflatus

(n.) ah-FLAY-tuhs-divine inspiration; supernatural suggestion

The writer said the idea for his latest novel was one that originated from spiritual afflatus.

agelast

(n.) AJ-uh-last-a person who doesn't laugh

Her boss was such an agelast that trying to joke with him was a lost cause.

ageusia

(n.) ah-GYOO-zee-uh-inability to taste

Cigarette smoking may cause ageusia.

aglet

(n.) AG-lit-plastic on the end of a lace

The cracked aglet made the shoelace useless.

agrestic

(adj.) ah-GRES-tik-rustic

The farmer's agrestic behavior did not mesh well with that of his sophisticated in-laws.

ague

(n.) EY-gyoo-a chill

The mound of blankets did nothing to relieve Mabel's ague.

ailurophile

(n.) eye-LOOR-oh-fyle-a cat lover

The ailurophile had a picture of her cat, Cleo, on her desk.

akimbo

(adj.) ah-KIM-boh-set in a bent position

In the high winds, Miss America's hair was blown akimbo.

albescent

(adj.) al-BES-unt-turning white

Ellen's albescent face resulted from her learning about the bad news.

albumen

(n.) al-BYOO-muhn-egg white

Greg doesn't like yolks, so he orders his omelet with just the albumens.

aleatory

(adj.) AY-lee-ah-tor-ee-reliant on luck

Harold took part in the aleatory game because he enjoyed taking risks.

algid

(adj.) AL-jid-chilly

The algid man's skin looked to be very clammy.

amanuensis

(n.) ah-man-yoo-en-sis-someone who takes dictation

Chrissy was the CEO's indispensable amanuensis.

amative

(adj.) AM-uh-tiv-relating to love

Her amative suggestions were not always welcome in the office.

ambit

(n.) AM-bit-range of influence

The ambit of the U.S. Federal Reserve extends far beyond the United States.

ambrosial

(adj.) am-BROH-zhul-having a sweet scent or taste

Walter loved to walk in the park and smell the ambrosial flowers.

amusia

(n.) ah-MYOO-zee-uh-the inability to detect musical tones

For most amusia sufferers, listening to music is pointless and even unpleasant.

anathematize

(v.) ah-NATH-uh-mah-tahyz-to curse

Hester Prynne, in The Scarlet Letter, was anathematized by society because of her adultery.

anatine

(adj.) AN-uh-tyn-relating to ducks

The anatine entourage scurried along the shore to join the lone duck in the water.

anfractuous

(adj.) an-FRAK-tchoo-us-snaky; full of twists

The car handled well on the anfractuous mountain road.

animadversion

(n.) an-ih-mad-VUR-zhun-harsh criticism

Patrick was the type of guy that would cry from any sort of animadversion from his boss.

anomie

(n.) AN-oh-mee-isolation due to a lack of social control

Sam, who suffers from extreme anomie, never leaves his house.

anosmia

(n.) an-OZ-mee-uh-inability to smell

Dave developed a temporary anosmia as a result of his stuffy nose.

antediluvian

(adj.) an-tih-duh-LOO-vee-uhn-ancient

My co-worker's style is so out-of-date her outfits seem to be antediluvian.

anuptaphobia

(n.) ah-nup-ta-FOH-bee-ah-fear of being alone

His anuptaphobia drove him to sign up for the online dating service.

aphotic (adj.) ah-FO-tik-dark

The diver's dream was to reach the aphotic depths of the sea.

apiary

(n.) EY-pee-er-ee-where bees are housed

Beverly donned a protective bee suit before she entered the apiary.

aplomb

(n.) ah-PLOM-self-confidence

Most singers on American Idol perform with the aplomb of a seasoned veteran.

apogee

(n.) AP-oh-jee-the culmination

At its apogee, the Mayan civilization made discoveries in agriculture, astronomy, and writing technologies.

apoplectic

(adj.) ap-uh-PLEK-tik-very angry

He was so apoplectic his face was purple with rage.

arcanum

(n.) ar-KEY-nuhm-a secret

The linguist could not get through the arcanum of computer programming languages.

arrears

(n.) ah-REERZ-late in fulfilling payment or promise

Rod's account was in arrears with the mafia, so the mobster was forced to send his men to collect.

arriviste

(n.) ah-ree-VEEST-one who recently acquired high position but not respect.

The arriviste tried fruitlessly to be accepted into society.

arrogate

(v.) AR-uh-geyt-to claim without right

My dog arrogates my bed every night before I go to bed.

aspersion

(n.) ah-SPUR-zhuhn-slander

I try to ignore aspersions cast upon politicians and celebrities.

assiduity

(n.) as-ih-DOO-ih-tee-diligent effort

The employees performed their duties with the same assiduity as their managers.

ataraxia

(n.) at-uh-RAK-see-uh-peace of mind

Abby left her BlackBerry at home so that she could achieve absolute ataraxia on vacation.

atelier

(n.) at-l-YAY-workshop

The garage served as the painter's atelier.

atrabilious

(adj.) at-ruh-BIL-yuhs-morbid, gloomy

The atrabilious man was in no mood for jokes.

attar

(n.) AT-ahr-a perfumed oil derived from flowers

The rare attar sold for hundreds of dollars.

aubade

(n.) oh-BAHD-a song greeting the dawn

As Elaine watched the sunrise, she heard the birds singing their aubade.

augur

(v.) AW-ger-bode

The broken alarm clock and burnt coffee did not augur well for Marvin's first day of work.

august

(adj.) aw-GUHST-awe inspiring

The august words of Helen's professor led her to pursue a career in education.

austral

(adj.) AW-strul-of or coming from the southern hemisphere

Greg was an austral man through and through, from his taste in food to his accent.

autochthonous

(adj.) aw-TOK-thuh-nuhs-native

Hank felt like an outcast when he moved to Africa and was surrounded by autochthonous people.

autodidact

(n.) aw-toh-DAHY-dakt-a person who is self-taught

An autodidact by nature, Amy taught herself German before her trip to Vienna.

avuncular

(adj.) ah-VUHNG-kyuh-ler-friendly, like an uncle

Tom's older co-worker showed an avuncular concern for his well-being.

B

badinage

(n.) bad-n-AZH-banter

Zoe invited friends over for an evening of badinage over a bottle-or two-of pinot.

bailiwick

(n.) BAY-lih-wik-a person's talent

The professor's bailiwick is mathematics.

baksheesh

(n.) BAK-sheesh-a tip for service

The foreigner paid baksheesh to the customs official.

banausic

(adj.) buh-NAW-zik-dull, routine

After years of banausic assembly-line work, Shawn found an exciting job at a media company.

barbate

(adj.) BAHR-beyt-bearded

Once meticulously clean-shaven, he was now barbate.

barratry

(n.) BAR-uh-tree-groundless, persistent lawsuits

Attorneys involved in barratry may be suspended from the practice of law or disbarred.

beatitude

(n.) be-AT-i-tud-extreme joy

Henry woke up in a state of beatitude on Friday.

becalm

(v.) bi-KAHM-to deprive of wind

The schooner was becalmed in the middle of the ocean, surrounded by the setting sun.

bedizen

(v.) bih-DY-zuhn-to dress gaudily

The gem-bedizened woman was sparkling from head to toe.

bellicose

(adj.) BEL-ih-kohss-favoring battle

The country had a history of bellicose tendencies.

bemire

(v.) bee-MAYUHR-cover with mud

The soldiers bemired themselves as a camouflage.

bibliophage

(n.) BIB-lee-uh-feyj-a bookworm

Barry the bibliophage likes to spend his Friday nights at the library.

bibulous

(adj.) BIB-yu-luhs-fond of drinking alcohol

The harsh daylight was unkind to the old man's grizzled, bibulous face.

biddable

(adj.) BID-uh-bul-obedient

The biddable assistant never once argued with his boss.

billet

(n.) BIL-it-a job

Debbie decided to take a billet that she did not necessarily enjoy but that paid well.

billingsgate

(n.) BIL-ingz-gayt-vulgar language

Kathy's never-ending stream of billingsgate made everyone at the dinner party cringe.

bissextile

(adj.) by-SEKS-tayl-leap year

George was born in a bissextile year and has a birthday only every four years.

blandishment

(n.) BLAN-dish-ment-flattery

She ignored the salesperson's blandishments.

blatherskite

(n.) BLATH-er-skayt-a babbling fool

The meeting ran long and nothing got accomplished because it was run by a blatherskite.

blimpish

(adj.) BLIM-pish-pompous, windbaglike

The waiter was fed up with the restaurant's blimpish clientele.

bloviate

(v.) BLOH-vee-eyht-to communicate in a pompous way

At his high school reunion, the Yale graduate bloviated about his academic standing.

bombinate

(v.) BOM-buh-neyt-to buzz

The computers bombinate if they are left on for too long.

boodle

(n.) BOOD-l-a bribe

The woman gave her secretary a boodle to destroy the files.

borborygmi

(n.) bawr-buh-RIG-mahy-rumbling sounds made by the digestive tract

Her borborygmi were embarrassingly loud; she needed breakfast now.

boscage

(n.) BOS-kij-a bunch of trees or bushes

Bill spent the afternoon trying to tame the massive boscage in his backyard.

bouleversement

(n.) bool-VAIR-suh-MAWN-an overtaking

Digital downloads have caused a bouleversement of music-buying trends.

brabble

(v.) BRAB-uhl-to argue over something petty

The couple brabbled over which movie to see.

bravura

(n.) brah-VYOOR-ah-a showy display

The figure skater's bravura made his routine a real crowd-pleaser.

bric-a-brac

(n.) BRIK-uh-brak-sentimental trinkets

The garage sale featured books, toys, and other bric-a-brac.

brinkmanship

(n.) BRINK-man-ship-pushing a dangerous situation to the limit

South Korea accused North Korea of brinkmanship.

brio

(n.) BREE-oh-liveliness; spirit

The Shakespearean actor was acclaimed for performing each role with brio.

bristly

(adj.) BRIS-lee-easily irritable

The bristly exchange between the defendant and the judge did not bode well for his case.

Brobdingnagian

(adj.) brob-ding-NAG-ee-uhn-gigantic

The Brobdingnagian couple was destined to have colossal kids.

bromidic

(adj.) broh-MID-ik-stale, clichéd

My wife's bromidic TV shows are easy to sleep through.

brumal

(adj.) BROO-mal-related to winter

With the brumal weather finally gone, they enjoyed a drink on the patio.

brume

(n.) BROOM-mist; fog

Unable to see clearly, Barbara drove slowly through the early morning brume.

brutalist

(n.) BROO-tal-ist-plain, sturdy architecture

The dreary skyline was dominated by brutalist structures.

bumptious

(adj.) BUMP-shuhs-crudely self-confident

Unable to listen to Tom's bumptious conversation, Kia ended the date early.

bunkum

(n.) BUNG-kum-insincere talk

Tony's argument was quickly dismissed as bunkum.

busker

(n.) BUSK-ur-a street entertainer

Tracy Chapman was a busker in Boston before she was signed to a record deal.

C

cabal

(n.) kah-BAL-a small group plotting against a leader

The cabal of jaded cabinet members conspired to kill the president.

cachexia

(n.) kah-KEK-see-uh-sick emaciation

Cachexia is often seen in cancer and AIDS patients.

cachinnate

(v.) KAK-uh-neyt-to laugh loudly

Carrie cachinnated until her sides were sore.

cacodaemon

(n.) kak-uh-DEE-muhn-demon

I have a hard time ignoring the cacodaemon within me that tempts me with treats and sweets.

cacoëthes

(n.) kak-oh-EE-theez-undeniable urge

Chris developed a cacoëthes for eggnog during Christmas.

cacography

(n.) kak-OG-ruh-fee-bad penmanship

The computer was the best thing that happened to Jacqui's cacography.

cacophony

(n.) kak-OF-uh-nee-harsh dissonant sound

The Iowa native was not accustomed to New York City's cacophony of sounds.

cadge

(v.) KAJ-to beg

Dennis cadged his parents for money after he graduated from college.

caducity

(adj.) ka-DOO-sit-ee-senility

On his fiftieth birthday, he developed a fear of caducity.

caitiff

(n.) KAY-tif-a rotten person

The rival politicians tried to portray each other as caitiffs.

calaboose

(n.) kah-le-BOOS-a prison

Christine was sentenced to two weeks in the calaboose for stealing office supplies.

caliginous

(adj.) kah-LIJ-uh-nus-dark, gloomy

Beth fell into a caliginous state when she was fired from her job.

callithump

(n.) KAL-uh-thump-a loud, rowdy parade

The neighborhood kids would bang pans together whenever they put on their springtime callithump.

calumniate

(v.) kah-LUHM-nee-eyt-slander

My co-worker likes to calumniate anyone who isn't within earshot.

calvous

(adj.) KAL-vuhs-bald

My calvous father always burns his head in the summer.

camarilla

(n.) kam-uh-RIL-uh-a secret group of advisers

Whispering in the president's ear, the camarilla had access to power without bearing responsibility for the effects of their advice.

canard

(n.) kah-NAHRD-false story or rumor

The journalists focused upon the politician's canard during the press conference.

canorous

(adj.) kah-NOR-us-mellifluous, musical

The birds' canorous sounds herald the arrival of spring.

capacious

(adj.) kah-PAY-shuhs-spacious; roomy

Her capacious purse weighed ten pounds, and she could never find a thing in it.

caprice

(n.) kah-PREES-an abrupt, unpredictable thought or action

A momentary caprice compelled Ryan to propose to Rochelle during a trip to Paris.

captious

(adj.) KAP-shuhs-given to finding faults

The captious critic rarely gave a film more than two stars out of five.

carapace (n.) KAIR-uh-pace-the thick shell on turtles and crabs

The lobster's carapace turns red in boiling water.

careworn

(adj.) KAR-worn-haggard

No cream could clear the worry lines off of Joy's careworn face.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from THE WORD LOVER'S DELIGHT Copyright © 2009 by Captivate Network, a Division of Gannett Satellite Information Network. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews