The Work of Nations: Preparing Ourselves for 21st Century Capitalis [NOOK Book]

Overview

There is no longer such a thing as an American economy, say Robert Reich at the beginning of this brilliant book.  What does it mean to be a nation when money, goods, and services know no borders?  What skills will be the most valuable in the coming century? And how can our country best ensure that all its citizen have a share in the new global economy?  Robert B. Reich, the widely respected and bestselling author of The Next American Frontier and The Resurgent Liberal, defines the real ...

See more details below
The Work of Nations: Preparing Ourselves for 21st Century Capitalis

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.99
BN.com price

Overview

There is no longer such a thing as an American economy, say Robert Reich at the beginning of this brilliant book.  What does it mean to be a nation when money, goods, and services know no borders?  What skills will be the most valuable in the coming century? And how can our country best ensure that all its citizen have a share in the new global economy?  Robert B. Reich, the widely respected and bestselling author of The Next American Frontier and The Resurgent Liberal, defines the real challenge facing the United States in the 21st century in this trail-blazing book.  Original, readable, and vastly informed, The Work of Nations is certain to set a standard for the next generation of policy-makers.




From the Trade Paperback edition.

What skills will be the most valuable in the coming century? How can our country ensure that all its citizens have a share in the new global economy? The author of The Next American Frontier addresses these questions in a trail-blazing new book that is certain to guide a generation of policy makers.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This stimulating treatise urges Americans to prepare for a newly emerging global economic order. (Feb.)
Library Journal
According to Harvard economist Reich, author of The Resurgent Liberal ( LJ 8/89), we are going through a historic transformation that is rearranging the politics and economics of the 1990s and the 21st century. Economies are no longer simply national in scope but global, rewarding the most skilled around the world with ever greater wealth while consigning the less skilled to declining standards of living. He sees the global work forces as already divided into three groups: routine producers (e.g., data processors), in-person servers (e.g., librarians), and symbolic analysts who manipulate symbols for large profits (e.g., financial wizards). In 1989, these analysts comprised about one-fifth of the population of the United States, but they earned more than half the income. As the rich get richer and the rest get poorer, Reich urges a national recommitment to the productivity and competitiveness of all citizens. This is highly recommended for all academic and public libraries.-- Jeffrey R. Herold, Bucyrus P.L., Ohio
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307772992
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 12/1/2010
  • Series: Vintage
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 621,775
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Currently Secretary of Labor in the Clinton Administration, Robert Reich is a member of the faculty of Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and one of America's foremost political economists.  A graduate of Dartmouth College, Yale Law School, and Oxford University, he served as Assistant to the Solicitor General in the Ford administrations and Director of Policy Planning for the Federal Trade Commission in the Carter administration.  He is a contributing editor of The New Republic, chairman of the editorial board of The American Prospect, a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review and The Atlantic, and a regular commentator for both National Public Radio, and public television.  He is the author of The Resurgent Liberal, Tales of a New America, New Deals: The Chrysler Revival and the American System, The Next American Frontier, Minding America's Business, and other books.  Reich lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, with his wife and two sons.




From the Trade Paperback edition.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2001

    The Economist Rebuttal

    The argument Reich makes is not for more government spending, it is for different government spending. Reich questions the very ideas and our views of the national economy and what if any role large corporations play vs. the role people play? His focus is not on a liberal agenda but on a key policy question: What can we do as a nation so that the PEOPLE in our nation are better off. Think about who dislikes the idea of rethinking huge corporate welfare systems and reform of business lobbying of government and you will know who dislikes the ideas expressed in this very enlightening book. Another misconception is that corporations relocate headquarters when taxes get progressive. Taxes are much lower in many nations in the world already... why not move there now? The point is brain drain and companies moving away are idle threats. Corporations remain in the U.S. because of our rich human capital and the only way to retain that human capital is through education which to a certain extent requires the deceleration and hopefully the reversal of growing income inequality in this great country of ours.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)