The workers in American history

The workers in American history

4.5 2
by James Oneal
     
 
This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back

Overview

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940024721605
Publisher:
[New York] : The Rand School of Social Science
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
441 KB

Read an Excerpt


Chapter III White Slavery in the Colonies Marx has said that "A great deal of capital, which appears today in the United States without any certificate of birth, was yesterday, in England, the capitalized blood of children."1 The same holds true of men and women of other countries of Europe. By the beginning of the seventeenth century the beggared population of England became a "problem" to the ruling class. The extension of the wool trade gave added stimulus to the eviction of the poor from the land and transforming great estates of fertile soil into sheep pastures. The gulf between the plunderers and their victims widened and the desperate poverty of the latter increased the fear of labor revolts. "Colonization was thought by many to be the only means of obtaining permanent relief from the pressing political and economic dangers of pauperism."2 But even this pauperism was not permitted to be an unprofitable by-product of land thefts. The American colonies were regarded as a convenient dumping ground for these unfortunates, so that between the years 1661 and 1668 various proposals were made to the king and council to constitute an office for transporting to the plantations all vagrants, rogues and idle persons that could give no account of themselves, felons who had the benefit of clergy, and such as were convictedof petty larceny—such persons to be transported to the nearest seaport and to serve four years if over twenty years of age, and seven years if under twenty. It was poor wretches like these in England, Germany and other countries who were seized upon to provide white slave labor for the colonies. iMarx, "Capital," p. 479. Humbolt Edition. SThwaltes, "The Colonies,"p. 65. This cheap, servile labor was essential to the society planted by the corporations in th...

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