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The World They Made Together: Black and White Values in Eighteenth-Century Virginia
     

The World They Made Together: Black and White Values in Eighteenth-Century Virginia

by Mechal Sobel
 
"Ms. Sobel's book is a work of great importance, and not only to the scholars who will be its primary audience. . . . Ms. Sobel's assertion that--as C. Vann Woodward once put it--black and white southerners `shared and molded a common culture' represents a bold departure from recent trends. . . . a stunning reinterpretation of colonial Virginia's culture."--Jan Lewis,

Overview

"Ms. Sobel's book is a work of great importance, and not only to the scholars who will be its primary audience. . . . Ms. Sobel's assertion that--as C. Vann Woodward once put it--black and white southerners `shared and molded a common culture' represents a bold departure from recent trends. . . . a stunning reinterpretation of colonial Virginia's culture."--Jan Lewis, The New York Times Book Review

Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review
Ms. Sobel's book is a work of great importance, and not only to the scholars who will be its primary audience. . . . Ms. Sobel's assertion that--as C. Vann Woodward once put it--black and white southerners 'shared and molded a common culture' represents a bold departure from recent trends. . . . A stunning reinterpretation of colonial Virginia's culture.
— Jan Lewis
New York Times Book Review
Ms. Sobel's book is a work of great importance, and not only to the scholars who will be its primary audience. . . . Ms. Sobel's assertion that—as C. Vann Woodward once put it—black and white southerners 'shared and molded a common culture' represents a bold departure from recent trends. . . . A stunning reinterpretation of colonial Virginia's culture.
— Jan Lewis
New York Review of Books
The trend in modern studies of slavery has been . . . to emphasize the survival of the African heritage and the autonomy of black culture even under slavery. Sobel takes the trend a step further in contending that attitudes and casts of mind carried from Africa penetrated and altered the dominant English culture. . . . Most significantly Sobel finds black and white patters of religious experience meshing and merging in the evangelical denominations that swept up lower- and middle-class Virginians in the last half of the eighteenth century.
— Edmund S. Morgan
Christian Science Monitor
Mechal Sobel offers a revisionist look at the culture of the American South before 1800. Her approach presents a perspective on the South not found in comprehensive general histories. . . . In chapters woven with anecdotes, Sobel describes striking similarities and peculiar difference in the ways black and working class white Virginians spent their days, how they worshiped, where they lived, and how they saw themselves in relation to the rest of the world.
— Mary Tabor
New York Times Book Review - Jan Lewis
Ms. Sobel's book is a work of great importance, and not only to the scholars who will be its primary audience. . . . Ms. Sobel's assertion that—as C. Vann Woodward once put it—black and white southerners 'shared and molded a common culture' represents a bold departure from recent trends. . . . A stunning reinterpretation of colonial Virginia's culture.
New York Review of Books - Edmund S. Morgan
The trend in modern studies of slavery has been . . . to emphasize the survival of the African heritage and the autonomy of black culture even under slavery. Sobel takes the trend a step further in contending that attitudes and casts of mind carried from Africa penetrated and altered the dominant English culture. . . . Most significantly Sobel finds black and white patters of religious experience meshing and merging in the evangelical denominations that swept up lower- and middle-class Virginians in the last half of the eighteenth century.
Christian Science Monitor - Mary Tabor
Mechal Sobel offers a revisionist look at the culture of the American South before 1800. Her approach presents a perspective on the South not found in comprehensive general histories. . . . In chapters woven with anecdotes, Sobel describes striking similarities and peculiar difference in the ways black and working class white Virginians spent their days, how they worshiped, where they lived, and how they saw themselves in relation to the rest of the world.
From the Publisher

"Ms. Sobel's book is a work of great importance, and not only to the scholars who will be its primary audience. . . . Ms. Sobel's assertion that--as C. Vann Woodward once put it--black and white southerners 'shared and molded a common culture' represents a bold departure from recent trends. . . . A stunning reinterpretation of colonial Virginia's culture."--Jan Lewis, New York Times Book Review

"The trend in modern studies of slavery has been . . . to emphasize the survival of the African heritage and the autonomy of black culture even under slavery. Sobel takes the trend a step further in contending that attitudes and casts of mind carried from Africa penetrated and altered the dominant English culture. . . . Most significantly Sobel finds black and white patters of religious experience meshing and merging in the evangelical denominations that swept up lower- and middle-class Virginians in the last half of the eighteenth century."--Edmund S. Morgan, New York Review of Books

"Mechal Sobel offers a revisionist look at the culture of the American South before 1800. Her approach presents a perspective on the South not found in comprehensive general histories. . . . In chapters woven with anecdotes, Sobel describes striking similarities and peculiar difference in the ways black and working class white Virginians spent their days, how they worshiped, where they lived, and how they saw themselves in relation to the rest of the world."--Mary Tabor, Christian Science Monitor

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780691047478
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Publication date:
01/01/1988
Pages:
377
Product dimensions:
6.43(w) x 9.57(h) x 1.19(d)

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