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The World Within: A Novel of Emily Brontë
     

The World Within: A Novel of Emily Brontë

by Jane Eagland
 

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Emily Bronte loves her sisters, responsible Charlotte and quiet Anne, and her brother, tempestuous Branwell. She loves the moors that stretch all around the little village of Haworth, and wandering over them in the worst of weather. And she loves most of all the writing that brings all these things together, as she and her siblings create vast kingdoms and vivid

Overview


Emily Bronte loves her sisters, responsible Charlotte and quiet Anne, and her brother, tempestuous Branwell. She loves the moors that stretch all around the little village of Haworth, and wandering over them in the worst of weather. And she loves most of all the writing that brings all these things together, as she and her siblings create vast kingdoms and vivid adventures that take them deep into their imaginations.

But change is coming to Haworth, as their father falls ill and the girls must learn how to support themselves. How can Emily preserve both what she loves, and herself, and find her way into the future?

From the award-winning author of Wildthorn, the story of a young writer finding her voice, and a window into the mind of the beloved but mysterious Emily Bronte.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Praise for The World Within

A Junior Library Guild Selection

"A girl runs wild and writes furiously in this portrait of author Emily Bronte's early years." -- Kirkus Reviews

"The World Within should prove an inspiring account to aspiring teen authors and historical fiction fans." -- Voice of Youth Advocates

Praise for Jane Eagland's Wildthorn

Lambda Literary Award for Children's/Young Adult

"Eagland's debut stands out for its well-crafted treatment of an unconventional love affair." -- Booklist

"Wildthorn is a dark tale featuring a vibrant protagonist who refuses to let others squelch her passion....Fans of historical fiction or GLBTQ fiction will likely enjoy this unique story of mystery and romance." -- Voice of Youth Advocates

VOYA, February 2015 (Vol. 37, No. 6) - Kate Conklin
Before becoming famous writers, the Brontë sisters grew up in an isolated household full of grief and tragedy. Charlotte, Emily, and Anne, as well as their brother Branwell, faced the loss of their mother and two oldest sisters at a young age. Their father was poor, but invested in his children and their education, encouraging the free flow of ideas. Emily was particularly introverted, rarely leaving her home, and she liked it that way. Her writing was a way to escape her anxieties and grief and explore a different world. Emily's limited contact with people outside of her family made her few friendships all the more precious, and she clung to those whom she loved. She knew there had to be a way to make writing her life. As Eagland states in the author's note, this is a fictional imagining of what Emily Brontë might have been like, using bits of actual events in sometimes inaccurate ways to further the story. It is a window into the difficulties of being poor and female in society in 19th-century England, and explores the few bits of information available regarding the Brontë family life. The World Within should prove an inspiring account to aspiring teen authors and historical fiction fans who are not sticklers for accuracy. Reviewer: Kate Conklin; Ages 12 to 15.
Children's Literature - Natalie Gurr
Before she was a world renowned author, Emily Bronte was just a young girl trying to figure out her place in the world. Here, Emily is a tomboy who is not afraid to speak her mind. She adores her home surrounded by tempestuous moors in the charming village of Haworth. But times are shifting for the Brontë family; her father becomes ill and everything changes. Anne is sent away to school and what little money left is spent on the education of Branwell, Emily’s thoughtless brother. Through all of these changes, Emily has her writing to stay grounded. The big question is will it be enough to get her through all the trials coming her way? Many of the events in the novel are based around historical events, but the author makes a point of saying that this is a work of fiction. Fans of the Brontë sisters might enjoy this innocent tromp into their lives, but, readers looking for a more dramatic story will be disappointed. Most of the plot focuses on everyday life and the challenges of living in the nineteenth century. Much is made of Emily sewing and completing chores. The writing style reads as if the main character is speaking of herself in third person and is often distracting. This book is a heartfelt imagining of what life might have been like for Emily Brontë, but of little interest to those who are not already familiar with and appreciative of the Brontë sisters’ works. Reviewer: Natalie Gurr; Ages 12 up.
School Library Journal
12/01/2014
Gr 6–9—Eagland uses a line from an Emily Brontë poem as inspiration for the title of this novel to capture Emily's introverted nature and to reference the fantastical worlds that she and her siblings created. Emily's close-knit family—her father; siblings Branwell, Charlotte, and Anne; an aunt; and their housemaid—become real to readers. A scene where Emily's pious aunt dips into her snuff jar while Charlotte's friend is visiting is one example of Eagland's skill in adding depth to the characters. The protagonist's interactions with elders, siblings and their friends, and classmates at Roe Head reflect Emily's complexity, and the emotions she experiences as she navigates these relationships are genuine. Emily and Anne struggle with their personal faith in God, and the author conveys this timeless issue with acuity. The themes of family, being true to oneself, rural vs. urban living, and coming of age are interwoven throughout without weighing down the story. However, stilted transitions between certain scenes may be jarring for some readers. For those who want a more action-filled story about the Brontës, recommend Michaela MacColl's Always Emily (Chronicle, 2014).—Hilary Writt, Sullivan University, Lexington, KY
Kirkus Reviews
2014-12-06
A girl runs wild and writes furiously in this portrait of author Emily Brontë's early years.Although she chafes at society's expectations, as embodied by her stern aunt, Emily would gladly remain on the English moors with her dog and her scribbling siblings—braggart Branwell, cautious Charlotte and pious Anne—forever. Having lost her mother and older sisters, Emily loathes change and accordingly struggles with Charlotte's absences, her own brief time at boarding school and her father's illness. Inexplicably and violently shy, Emily hates being seen, discussed or even talked to by people outside the household. Self-isolated, she prefers walks in the wild and writing, initially creating melodramatic romances and adventures in the fantasy series shared with her siblings and, by novel's end, attempting a contemporary, character-based story by herself (presumably Wuthering Heights). Emily comes off as a complex, somewhat heartless and uncivilized girl, yet she's a better artist than Charlotte, a better musician than Branwell and a more committed writer than Anne—claims unsupported by her minimal surviving real-world work. In her author's note, Eagland admits to taking some liberties in her attempt to decipher the "enigmatic" Emily but relies heavily on well-chronicled facts and Emily's one and only novel. Despite liberties, this is more educational than entertaining and is best suited to fans of the Brontës or biographic celebrations of tortured 19th-century authors. (Historical fiction. 12-18)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780545492959
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
03/31/2015
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
5.80(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.30(d)
Lexile:
850L (what's this?)
Age Range:
12 Years

Meet the Author


Jane Eagland was born in Essex, England, and taught high school English for many years. She now divides her time between writing and tutoring. Her first novel, WILDTHORN, received the Lambda Literary Award. Jane lives in Lancashire, England, only about one hundred miles from where the Brontes grew up.

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