The World's Worst Weapons: From Exploding Guns to Malfunctioning Missiles

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Overview

The World’s Worst Weapons is an entertaining and informative guide to the small arms, artillery, tanks, ships, missiles, and aircraft that proved to be utter failures in battle. Examples of ill-conceived weapons include WWII Soviet dog mines: dogs carrying explosives which were trained to run under German tanks, which in practice preferred the tanks of their own side, with disastrous results. Or the Douglas X-3 Stiletto aircraft, designed in the 1950s to explore the “supersonic flight environment” but seriously ...

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Overview

The World’s Worst Weapons is an entertaining and informative guide to the small arms, artillery, tanks, ships, missiles, and aircraft that proved to be utter failures in battle. Examples of ill-conceived weapons include WWII Soviet dog mines: dogs carrying explosives which were trained to run under German tanks, which in practice preferred the tanks of their own side, with disastrous results. Or the Douglas X-3 Stiletto aircraft, designed in the 1950s to explore the “supersonic flight environment” but seriously underpowered and incapable of passing the speed of sound in level flight. Each weapon is illustrated with a full-page photograph, annotated to show particularly bad, dangerous, or unusual features. The lively text provides an insight into the history and (lack of) development of each weapon, alongside archive images from the weapon’s brief heyday, artwork, or diagrams. Featuring some of history’s weirdest, ugliest, and most dangerous (to the user) military equipment, this is an excellent guide to the weapons that went badly wrong.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780760785812
  • Publisher: Metro Books
  • Publication date: 3/24/2007
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 165,982
  • Product dimensions: 6.31 (w) x 4.69 (h) x 1.00 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 15, 2013

    I bought the worst cars book in this series and thumbed through

    I bought the worst cars book in this series and thumbed through it in the store. 
    Their picks are generally fun although a lot of the "worst" weapons  were some of the most successful and massively produced
    weapons in history.  
    AK-47? Probably the most produced weapon that caused the most damage to the west. Sure, it's not as precise as the M-16 but it works fine if Uncle Ivan is your supplier. Early M-16s were spectacularly bad when they didn't work, though they admit they still make news ones after they worked out the bugs. They missed the M103 heavy tank, and the misguided MBT-70, but  the space-age Sheridan is a pretty good example of how not to build a tank though it was actually a moderate success for the crews that figured out how to keep them working., and the M60E2 was a big flop missed "starship" name. 
    Some specs are mixed up like range and speed.
    The Stuka and HE-111 were some of the best and most successful planes the Luftwaffe had until the Battle of Britain,
    The Me-210 and 110 were never successful. Grief bomber was a worst, V2 again a huge success if you overlook the downsides.
    They missed the Navy's F-111B (as agile as a Greyhound bus) which paved the way for the F-14 Tomcat , but did mention the Missileer, the AIM-47 falcon was a flop, but was recycled into the AIM-54 Phoenix (which was an in-service flop as it was almost never fired in anger).
    The M113 is certainly the least awesome war machine ever conceived, but the most successful tracked fighting machine the west has ever produced in terms of numbers and fitted with ACAV turret shield and 2 extra topside guns terrified the Viet Cong.
    Brits have the Nimrod AEW, but it wasn't recent enough to include the latest Nimrods where the paid a fortune to completely rework ancient airframes only to scrap them all, and retired older Nimrods after thew blew up after refueling and couldn't figure out how to fix them.
    You could look up this stuff on Wikiepedia, but it's all in a handy book that fits in your bathroom.

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