The Worried Child: Recognizing Anxiety in Children and Helping Them Heal

The Worried Child: Recognizing Anxiety in Children and Helping Them Heal

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by Paul Foxman Ph.D.
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0897934202

ISBN-13: 9780897934206

Pub. Date: 02/15/2004

Publisher: Turner Publishing Company

Anxiety in children diminishes their intellectual, emotional and social development, as well as physical health. Author Paul Foxman believes there are three interacting ingredients that contribute to anxiety in children — biological sensitivity, personality, and stress overload.

The Worried Child shows that anxiety is preventable – or can at least be

Overview

Anxiety in children diminishes their intellectual, emotional and social development, as well as physical health. Author Paul Foxman believes there are three interacting ingredients that contribute to anxiety in children — biological sensitivity, personality, and stress overload.

The Worried Child shows that anxiety is preventable – or can at least be minimized – by raising children's self confidence, increasing social and self-control skills, and teaching them how to play, relax, and communicate their feelings and needs. Written for parents and teachers and anyone dealing with children, the guide covers the importance of adequate rest, sleep, and exercise and provides detailed lists, skill exercises, sample dialogues, and case studies. It also presents extensive information on the various types and symptoms of anxiety disorders. Advice for educators, health care professionals, childcare workers and psychotherapists is included along with a chapter and tutorial written specifically for children.

The Worried Child is a highly accessible self-help guide for anyone dealing with a child who is or may become anxious.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780897934206
Publisher:
Turner Publishing Company
Publication date:
02/15/2004
Pages:
304
Sales rank:
185,084
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.90(d)

Table of Contents

Forewordx
Acknowledgmentsxii
Introduction1
How This Book Can Help4
My Experience with Anxiety5
Part IAnxiety in Children: When Is It Normal, When Is It a Disorder?7
Chapter 1What Is Anxiety?8
What Is Anxiety and Why Is It So Prevalent Today?9
Threats That Lead to Anxiety in Children11
The Role of Stress in Children's Anxiety12
Emotions and Anxiety16
Cognitive Patterns and Anxiety17
Three Ingredients in Anxiety17
Chapter 2Childhood Anxiety Disorders21
Children's Normal Fears21
Anxiety Disorders in Children23
Mixed Anxiety Disorders37
Secondary Depression37
Other Disorders Associated with Anxiety38
Anxiety Disorders at Different Ages38
Chapter 3Personality Traits in Anxious Children41
The "Anxiety Personality Style"41
Cognitive Patterns of the Anxious Child43
Assets and Liabilities of the Anxiety Personality Style44
Identifying Anxious Children in School and Day Care44
What Parents Can Do45
Part IISources of Anxiety in Children and How You Can Help to Counteract Them53
Chapter 4Before and Beyond Birth: Developmental Stages and the Roots of Anxiety54
Bonding54
Brain Development and Anxiety62
Early Child Development and Anxiety65
What Parents Can Do68
Chapter 5The Family and Anxiety in Children70
Divorce71
Child Abuse81
Performance Pressure83
Families and Feelings85
Other Family Patterns and Styles87
Sexuality88
Drug and Alcohol Abuse90
Religion and Spirituality91
Discipline95
Parents' Own Anxiety99
Stress in Parents103
Other Things Parents Can Do107
Chapter 6Society and Anxiety110
Dangers in the Environment111
Natural Disasters112
Lack of Health Care for Children114
Sexual Abuse116
Violations of Trust and Power123
Children as Exploited Consumers125
Drug and Alcohol Issues127
Obesity and Related Health Problems128
Chapter 7Terrorism, War, and Child Anxiety131
My Anxiety about War131
Terrorism134
Government Responses to Terrorism136
What Parents Can Do139
Chapter 8Anxiety in School144
Grading Our Schools144
How Schools Create Stress and Anxiety in Children145
Learning Styles146
Multiple Intelligences147
Emotional Intelligence149
Personality Integration150
Social Stress and Anxiety152
Bullying, Teasing, and Violence in Schools153
Theft in Schools154
Academic Sources of Anxiety155
Homework Stress and Anxiety155
When Does College Begin?156
What Parents Can Do159
Chapter 9The Media and Child Anxiety162
Television and Movies162
Music168
Video Games170
Inadequate Rating Systems172
Internet Surfing172
What Parents Can Do173
Part IIITreating Anxiety in Children177
Chapter 10Biochemistry, Medication, and Nature's Remedies178
Help Often Begins with the Family Doctor178
Biochemical Approach to Treating Anxiety180
Brief History of Drug Treatment for Anxiety181
Pros and Cons of Medication for Children's Anxiety181
Alternative-Medicine Approaches184
Chapter 11Psychotherapy for Anxious Children192
When to Seek Therapy192
How to Choose a Therapist for Your Anxious Child193
How Therapists Evaluate Anxious Children194
Types of Therapy for Anxious Children195
Components of Therapy for Anxious Children199
Treatment Progress212
Health-Insurance and Managed-Care Issues213
Chapter 12A Chapter for Young People: What You Can Do to Help Treat Your Own Anxiety216
What's Good about Anxiety?216
What You Should Know about Anxiety217
How to Relax and Why220
How to Control Stress222
Are You Having Fun Yet?224
Are You "Too Sensitive"?225
Are You a Perfectionist?226
Do You Worry a Lot?227
How to Stop Unwanted Thoughts or Behavior228
How to Speak Up for Yourself229
Are Your Parents Divorced?230
Does School Make You Anxious or Stressed?231
Bad Things That Can Happen and What You Can Do233
How Do You Feel?234
The Good and Bad News about Television, Movies, Video Games, and Music235
Good Foods and Bad Foods for Anxiety238
Should You Get Professional Help?240
Medicine for Anxiety241
Chapter 13Case Examples243
Social Anxiety243
Generalized Anxiety244
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder246
Group Therapy for Adolescent Social Anxiety248
Panic Disorder and Separation Anxiety252
Divorce, Separation Anxiety, and Emetophobia256
Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and Anxiety Associated with a Medical Condition257
Quick Cure for Generalized Anxiety Disorder259
PTSD with Mixed Anxiety Disorder260
In Closing263
AppendixWhat Schools Can Do to Reduce Anxiety264
Alternatives to Tests and Numerical Grades264
Group Learning and Multi-Age Classes266
Safety and Violence269
Relationship Between School and Family270
Curriculum Considerations272
Use of Technology273
Honor Code273
Resources275
Bibliography279
Index283

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The Worried Child: Recognizing Anxiety in Children and Helping Them Heal 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
How do I know if my child is worried or anxious? What causes a child to worry or become anxious? How can I talk to her about the problem? What resources are there for us? These and many other questions will be answered in the book The Worried Child by Paul Foxman PHD. Dr Foxman takes a gentle and common sense approach to helping the child and the family in this situation. He explains that there are many things that can cause stress and anxiety for a child, and discusses the impact it has on their daily lives and well being. He explains the difference between the normal every day stress and worry a child might feel and when it crosses the line to become a disorder that needs to be reckoned with. He presents information on how to recognize if your child is showing symptoms of anxiety. Issues from home life to school to the possible sexual abuse are addressed in these pages. disorders from Generalized Anxiety to OCD, Panic and Seperation anxiety explained. There is imformation on conflict resolution, which can be so important, not just for our children, but for ourselves. All types of therapy are discussed, from conventional 'talk therapy' to medications, and alternatives such as herbals, flower remedies and homeopathy. No matter what your personal philosophy of treatment might be, this book will help you along the way. The importance of good nutrition, and relaxation is emphasized. From the birth, to the child in college. Fears and stressors are discussed and possible solutions for allaying them are suggested. The important matter of bonding is addressed. Not just bonding with the child before and at birth, but staying connected with her throughout the years. This is a wonderful handbook for anyone with a child of any age. It gives calm and reassuring suggestions on how to handle those bumps in the road that we all face at some times or another. I highly recommend this to anyone who has or works with a child of any age.
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