The Wright Brothers: A Flying Start

The Wright Brothers: A Flying Start

by Elizabeth MacLeod
     
 

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As young men, Orville and Wilbur Wright had a dream. They believed that one day people would fly, and they were determined to be the first. Despite setbacks that would have discouraged many inventors, the Wright brothers' dream came true. From a windy sand dune near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, they made a short 36-meter flight —- and flew into aviation history

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Overview

As young men, Orville and Wilbur Wright had a dream. They believed that one day people would fly, and they were determined to be the first. Despite setbacks that would have discouraged many inventors, the Wright brothers' dream came true. From a windy sand dune near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, they made a short 36-meter flight —- and flew into aviation history.

This biography in the Snapshots: Images of People and Places in History series uses photographs, newspaper clippings, maps, quotes and drawings to explore the Wright brothers' struggles. Also included are timelines of their lives and the history of flight, and a listing of pertinent Web sites.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Full of interesting facts and well-captioned, period photos, this book is a good starting point for information on the lives and accomplishments of Wilbur and Orville Wright.

Although most libraries own several books on the Wright brothers, few of them can rival this one for clarity of text and variety of illustration. An excellent time line on the lives of the Wright brothers and the history of light is included. With its wealth of illustrative material, this title will especially appeal to reluctant readers and browsers.

No ordinary Biography of the Wright brother, this account features a scrapbooklike layout that will appeal to reluctant readers.

Children's Literature
We tend to think of Wilbur and Orville Wright as frozen in time in 1903, December 17, the date of their first successful flight. In actuality, their experiments began much earlier, and Orville lived until 1948, watching the mechanical and social evolution of the airplane go far beyond what the brothers, or anyone, had ever dreamed. Elizabeth MacLeod, naturally, concentrates on the years the Wrights spent directly involved in their quest for flight, although she does acknowledge earlier circumstances that shaped and occupied their interests. MacLeod also puts flight into historical context for the day, explaining (or trying to; some concepts are difficult to grasp) the major events and physical principles the Wrights were able to use as the basis for their own work. The book is well illustrated with photographs and diagrams (and what can only be described as tangential, yet interesting, memorabilia). There is minimal documentation-no bibliography, no suggested reading (just a list of web sites to visit), and quotations throughout are undated. This is flight and the Wright brothers at the most basic and most accessible level.
—Wendy Morris
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6 Although most libraries own several books on the Wright brothers, few of them can rival this one for clarity of text and variety of illustration. In topical spreads, MacLeod briefly covers the early life of these inventors and touches on their first experiments with kites and gliders, and their successes with powered flights. Though the text is not in-depth, the author is able to distill some of the problems the scientists faced into understandable terms for readers. Large-print highlighted quotes by the brothers lend a note of authority. Full-page prints of archival photos are offset with smaller pictures of the men at work, drawings made by the Wrights of early flying machines, and reproductions of related documents. An excellent time line on the lives of the Wright brothers and the history of flight is included. A solid index and list of Web sites add to the book's value. With its wealth of illustrative material, this title will especially appeal to reluctant readers and browsers. -Barbara Buckley, Rockville Centre Public Library, NY Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Booklist
Full of interesting facts and well-captioned, period photos, this book is a good starting point for information on the lives and accomplishments of Wilbur and Orville Wright.
Book Links
No ordinary Biography of the Wright brother, this account features a scrapbooklike layout that will appeal to reluctant readers.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781550749359
Publisher:
Kids Can Press, Limited
Publication date:
03/28/2002
Series:
Snapshots: Images of People and Places in History Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,438,406
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.31(d)
Lexile:
950L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Elizabeth MacLeod has written many children's books, including nine titles in the Snapshots Biography series, numerous titles in the Kids Can Read, Kids Books Of and Kids Can Do It series, Why Do Horses Have Manes?, What Did Dinosaurs Eat?, and Monster Fliers. She lives in Toronto.

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