The Writer in the Jewish Community

Overview

The Writer in the Jewish Community presents edited selections from the conference of the same name held in October 1988 at the University of California-Berkeley and Stanford University. Also included in the volume is a foreword by cochair Eli Shaltiel (publisher of Am Oved in Israel) and an afterword by Nessa Rapoport. The work is divided into three sections: "The Jew as Writer/The Writer as Jew," "Jewish Writing in Context," and "Breaking the Language Barrier: Literary Dialogues between Israel and the Diaspora."...
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Overview

The Writer in the Jewish Community presents edited selections from the conference of the same name held in October 1988 at the University of California-Berkeley and Stanford University. Also included in the volume is a foreword by cochair Eli Shaltiel (publisher of Am Oved in Israel) and an afterword by Nessa Rapoport. The work is divided into three sections: "The Jew as Writer/The Writer as Jew," "Jewish Writing in Context," and "Breaking the Language Barrier: Literary Dialogues between Israel and the Diaspora." What defines the Jewish writer, and how different is an American Jewish writer from an Israeli writer? Jewish writers have always struggled with where they stand as individuals, and where Jews stand as a people with a unique history. Whatever language Jewish writers choose to write in, a common cultural past unites them: Jewish survival, the Holocaust, Israel, nationality, and Jewish traditions. These issues of art and identity were addressed by more than thirty of the most acclaimed Jewish poets, critics, novelists, and scholars from Israel and North America, gathered in the Bay Area for the largest modern Jewish writers' conference of its kind. In a series of lectures and panel discussions, renowned American writers Cynthia Ozick (The Messiah of Stockholm, The Pagan Rabbi), Max Apple (Free Agents), Rosellen Brown (Civil Wars), and Irving Howe (World of Our Fathers) shared ideas with Israeli writers Amos Oz (My Michael, The Black Box), Hanoch Bartov (The Brigade), and Hillel Halkin. Also exchanging views were Ted Solotaroff, Nessa Rapoport, Harvey Shapiro, David Scheutz, Meir Shalev, Alan Mintz, Meir Wieseltier, Ruth Almog, and Chana Bloch. Halkin talked about the crises faced by the masters - such as Bialik and Brenner - who chose to write in Hebrew, initiating its renaissance. Howe and Solotaroff discussed the crisis in subject matter for American writers who are Jewish. And Cynthia Ozick and Nessa Rapoport suggested applying the literary imaginatio
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Foreword 7
Introduction 11
Pt. I The Jew as Writer/The Writer as Jew
I Write Out of an Uncreated Identity 21
The Storyteller as a Jew 24
By the Book 28
The Story of Creation 37
Text, Language, and the Hope of Redemption 41
Squeezing History into a Teacup 45
Of Polished Mirrors 50
Pt. II Jewish Writing in Context
Sect. A The American Context
Marginality Revisited 59
Response to Ted Solotaroff: The End of Marginality in Jewish Literature 67
Tradition and Renewal 72
What's New in American Jewish Writing 77
Sect. B The Israeli Context
Polemos and Polemics 87
Six Forgotten Pioneers of Hebrew Literature 92
On the Predominance of Poetry in Modern Hebrew Literature 100
Response to Wieseltier 106
Pt. III Breaking the Language Barrier: Literary Dialogues between Israel and the Diaspora
Introduction 113
Imagining the Other: 1 115
Imagining the Other: 2 124
The Politics of Translation: Amichai and Ravikovitch in English 130
On Reading American Jewish Writers 140
Afterword: The Jewish Writer Unmasked 142
Contributors 148
Index 153
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