The Year of Billy Miller

The Year of Billy Miller

4.9 14
by Kevin Henkes
     
 

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A 2014 Newbery Honor Book
A New York Times Bestseller

Award-winning, nationally bestselling author Kevin Henkes introduces second-grader Billy Miller in this fast-paced and funny story about friendship, sibling rivalry, and elementary school. The Year of Billy Miller includes black-and-white art by Kevin Henkes and is perfect for fans of the

Overview

A 2014 Newbery Honor Book
A New York Times Bestseller

Award-winning, nationally bestselling author Kevin Henkes introduces second-grader Billy Miller in this fast-paced and funny story about friendship, sibling rivalry, and elementary school. The Year of Billy Miller includes black-and-white art by Kevin Henkes and is perfect for fans of the Ramona books; Frindle, by Andrew Clements; and the Clementine series.

The New York Times declared: "Henkes's delightful story is restrained and vivid . . . forgoing the overdramatic or zany, it shows the substance, warmth and adaptability of beautifully common family love." When Billy Miller has a mishap at the statue of the Jolly Green Giant at the end of summer vacation, he ends up with a big lump on his head. What a way to start second grade, with a lump on your head! As the year goes by, though, Billy figures out how to navigate elementary school, how to appreciate his little sister, and how to be a more grown up and responsible member of the family and a help to his busy working mom and stay-at-home dad. Newbery Honor author and Caldecott Medalist Kevin Henkes delivers a short, satisfying, laugh-out-loud-funny school and family story that features a diorama homework assignment, a school poetry slam, cancelled sleepovers, and epic sibling temper tantrums. This is a perfect short novel for the early elementary grades.

Editorial Reviews

Horn Book (starred review)
“A vivid yet secure portrait of a boy coming into his confidence . . . [with] a comfortable rhythm perfectly suited to young readers. . . . Nuanced and human.”
Booklist
“A story with a lot of heart.”
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
“Thoughtful kids able to tackle a book of this length will enjoy reading this on their own, but it would also make a fine choice for reading aloud in the classroom or home.”
New York Times
“Henkes’s delightful story is restrained and vivid in in just this way: forgoing the overdramatic or zany, it shows the substance, warmth and adaptability of beautifully common family love.”
The New York Times Book Review - Priscilla Gilman
The adults in the novel help Billy and his younger sister, Sal, in the same way that Henkes helps his child readers, not didactically but organically, by recognizing their vulnerability, sanctioning their anxiety, and encouraging them to face challenges with confidence and ingenuity…That contemporary novels for elementary school aged boys about ordinary family life are so rare makes this one all the more welcome…Henkes's delightful story is restrained and vivid…forgoing the overdramatic or zany, it shows the substance, warmth and adaptability of beautifully common family love.
Publishers Weekly
It’s the Year of the Rabbit, according to Billy Miller’s new second-grade teacher. It’s also the year of several dilemmas for the boy, including the fear he might “start forgetting things” due to bumping his head while on vacation over the summer. Then there’s the habitat diorama that Billy is assigned—the bat cave he creates doesn’t turn out quite like he’d hoped. Henkes’s (Junonia) gentle slice-of-life novel, divided into four sections, humorously examines these and other plights while capturing the essence of Billy’s relationships with four significant figures in his life: his teacher (who he accidentally insults on the first day of school); his stay-at-home, struggling-artist father; his sometimes annoying, sometimes endearing three-year-old sister; and his mother, about whom Billy must compose a poem to be presented at the end of the school year. Each segment introduces a new conflict that Billy manages to resolve without too much fuss or torment. The book’s clear structure, concrete images, and just-challenging-enough vocabulary are smartly attuned to emerging readers, and its warmth, relatable situations, and sympathetic hero give it broad appeal. Ages 8–12. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Claudia Mills
Kevin Henkes once again shows a masterful understanding of a child’s inner life in this gentle, meticulously observed chronicle of one boy’s second grade year. Billy starts second grade worried that the lump on his head, leftover from a tumble during summer vacation, may make him “not smart enough for second grade.” Soon, other worries emerge as well: that his teacher will think he was making fun of the chopsticks anchoring her hair when he mimed devil horns on the head of insufferable Emma; that his artist father’s crabbiness will persist while waiting for a creative breakthrough; that his sister Sal will continue to annoyingly and endlessly dote on the wonderfully named “Drop Sisters,” a family of five nearly identical plush whales (Raindrop, Dewdrop, Snowdrop, Gumdrop, and Lemondrop, soon to be joined by Coughdrop); that he will hurt Papa’s feelings if he writes his assigned poem about Mama instead. The small events of Billy’s life--that is, the kind of events that seem small to most adults but impossibly large to the children who experience them--are honored in Henkes’s clear-eyed, compassionate gaze. Henkes knows that when a usually good-natured parent raises his voice it feels “as if something in the universe had shifted.” He knows that a child believes he can will himself to stay up all night long, and in the morning he’ll be “a different person.” Kevin Henkes knows, and children can be grateful to have him as their chronicler and champion. Reviewer: Claudia Mills, Ph.D. AGERANGE: Ages 7 to 10.
School Library Journal
Gr 1–3—The beginning of a new school year brings anxious moments for Billy Miller, a typical second grader at Georgia O'Keeffe Elementary School in a small Wisconsin town. His new teacher, Ms. Silver, uses chopsticks to hold her hair in place and know-it-all Emma Sparks is unfortunately one of his desk mates. Just as a school year is divided into quarters, the book is divided into four parts-"Teacher," "Father," "Sister," and "Mother"-each offering a new perspective on Billy's personality and development through his interactions with these well-developed characters. He begins the school year with a lump on his head from a family-vacation incident and navigates glitter homework fiascos, canceled sleepover plans, and sibling annoyances as readers see the year unfold through funny and often poignant situations. Billy himself might have been daunted by a book with more than 200 pages, but eager young readers will find this a great first chapter book to share or read solo.—Cheryl Ashton, Amherst Public Library, OH
Kirkus Reviews
Billy Miller's second-grade year is quietly spectacular in a wonderfully ordinary way. Billy's year begins with his worry over the lump on his head, a souvenir of a dramatic summer fall onto concrete: Will he be up to the challenges his new teacher promises in her letter to students? Quickly overshadowing that worry, however, is a diplomatic crisis over whether he has somehow offended Ms. Silver on the first day of school. Four sections--Teacher, Father, Sister and Mother--offer different and essential focal points for Billy's life, allowing both him and readers to explore several varieties of creative endeavor, small adventures, and, especially, both challenges and successful problem-solving. The wonderfully self-possessed Sal, his 3-year-old sister, is to Billy much as Ramona is to Beezus, but without the same level of tension. Her pillowcase full of the plush yellow whales she calls the Drop Sisters (Raindrop, Gumdrop, etc.) is a memorable prop. Henkes offers what he so often does in these longer works for children: a sense that experiences don't have to be extraordinary to be important and dramatic. Billy's slightly dreamy interior life isn't filled with either angst or boisterous silliness--rather, the moments that appear in these stories are clarifying bits of the universal larger puzzle of growing up, changing and understanding the world. Small, precise black-and-white drawings punctuate and decorate the pages. Sweetly low-key and totally accessible. (Fiction. 7-10)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062268143
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/26/2015
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
36,674
Product dimensions:
7.90(w) x 5.40(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Kevin Henkes has been praised both as a writer and as an illustrator. He received the Caldecott Medal for Kitten’s First Full Moon; Caldecott Honors for Owen and Waiting; two Newbery Honors—one for Olive’s Ocean and one for The Year of Billy Miller—and Geisel Honors for Penny and Her Marble and for Waiting. His other books include Old Bear, A Good Day, Chrysanthemum, and the beloved Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse. Kevin Henkes lives with his family in Madison, Wisconsin.

www.kevinhenkes.com

Kevin Henkes has been praised both as a writer and as an illustrator. He received the Caldecott Medal for Kitten’s First Full Moon; Caldecott Honors for Owen and Waiting; two Newbery Honors—one for Olive’s Ocean and one for The Year of Billy Miller—and Geisel Honors for Penny and Her Marble and for Waiting. His other books include Old Bear, A Good Day, Chrysanthemum, and the beloved Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse. Kevin Henkes lives with his family in Madison, Wisconsin.

www.kevinhenkes.com

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Madison, Wisconsin
Date of Birth:
November 27, 1960
Place of Birth:
Racine, Wisconsin
Education:
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Website:
http://www.kevinhenkes.com

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The Year of Billy Miller 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Woe. My little sister who is in 2nd grade had this read aloud in school, and loves it. She cant stop talking about the fantastic storyline and characters.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its great
JMTJTC More than 1 year ago
I couldn’t help but love this book! It even won my Best Book Award! Books like this are really important because they teach children that they are not alone in what they are experiencing and feeling. There are lots of books like this with girl main characters—Ramona, Clementine, Judy Moody, etc.—however, boys also need to understand that it’s ok to make mistakes and not be good at communicating, but it is better to fix the problem and be courageous. This book doesn’t have much of a plot, other than following Billy over the course of second grade. It is broken down into main events that are categorized by Billy’s interactions with a specific character: Teacher, Father, Sister, Mother. I think that was a very intelligent way to break down this book. It can be hard for second graders to read a long chapter book, but this allows them to read a few chapters at a time and even leave the book alone for a long period of time and still be able to pick it back up and continue reading. I didn’t realize until halfway through the book that Henkes also wrote the Lily and the Purple Plastic Purse books. That made me love this book even more! The book deals with similar issues (through the eyes of a mouse). I love that Billy Miller expands on Lily’s and it is able to be more appreciated by both genders. And I prefer that books about real life experiences to be about actual humans. I think it helps children make more connections to the characters. You can read the rest of my review here: http://judgingmorethanjustthecover.blogspot.com/2015/09/the-year-of-billy-miller-kevin-henkes.html
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ravensrock More than 1 year ago
The year of billy miller is a good book its about a kid that is worried that he will not pass second grade grade.  He over heard his parents saying that when he fell and hit his head he started forgetting things. So he was like i'm not going to pass i'm not going to pass second grade. Later in t he book his dad said this is the year of billy miller.That made him happy! At the middle of the book he wanted to stay up late and in his room he though there was a monster so he went in his sisters room and stayed there. At the end he had passed second grade
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Gardenseed More than 1 year ago
I have given this book as a gift to two seven-year -old boys and both of them love it. The teacher of one of them has told the boy's mother that this book is a find! Perfect for her classroom collection!   The author has a gift for being able to get inside a child's mind and feelings and portray them in such a way as to help the reader grow and mature within himself and in his own relationships with others.  Although my hair is gray, I too enjoyed reading this book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is cool. Kevin Henkes is my favorite author.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love it i want it as my wife ok mine not yours mine
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's the best book ever you should toatly resd it over and over
book4children More than 1 year ago
I read this book to my kids at bedtime and they always begged for one more chapter. They both loved the story and talked about it during the day. I liked the story, but I didn't love it as much as my kids. I felt like there was a bigger theme going on, but I couldn't see it. Regardless, it was a sweet story about a boy making his way through second grade and his family. He helps each one of his family members in some way and they help him in turn. Content: clean
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Whoo
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My 7-year-old loves this book, and I really enjoy reading it to her.