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The Yearbook
     

The Yearbook

5.0 3
by Carol Masciola
 

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* A USA Today Bestseller *

Misfit teen Lola Lundy has every right to her anger and her misery. She's failing in school, living in a group home, and social workers keep watching her like hawks, waiting for her to show signs of the horrible mental illness that cost Lola's mother her life. Then, one night, she falls asleep in a storage room in her

Overview

* A USA Today Bestseller *

Misfit teen Lola Lundy has every right to her anger and her misery. She's failing in school, living in a group home, and social workers keep watching her like hawks, waiting for her to show signs of the horrible mental illness that cost Lola's mother her life. Then, one night, she falls asleep in a storage room in her high school library, where she's seen an old yearbook--from the days when the place was an upscale academy for young scholars instead of a dump. When Lola wakes, it's to a scene that is nothing short of impossible. Lola quickly determines that she's gone back to the past--eighty years in the past, to be exact. The Fall Frolic dance is going full blast in the gym, where Lola meets the brainy and provocative Peter Hemmings, class of '24. His face is familiar, because she's seen his senior portrait in the yearbook. By night's end, Lola thinks she sees hope for her disastrous present: She'll make a new future for herself in the past. But is it real? Or has the major mental illness in Lola's family background finally claimed her? Has she slipped through a crack in time, or into a romantic hallucination she created in her own mind, wishing on the ragged pages of a yearbook from a more graceful time long ago?

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Masciola writes a solid debut novel that teen girls will love.... The suspense and surprises will keep readers eager to learn how the story ends." --VOYA Magazine

"The ending. Wow. Grand conclusion. The Yearbook is obviously a standalone. Loose ends tied, amazing scenes, a gripping piece of dialogue.... An amazing story of a girl who may or may not be insane.... It's a great story to sink my feet into." --YA Books Central

"A troubled girl in foster care...finds a high school yearbook and becomes fascinated with it, suddenly finding herself back in the 1920s at a school dance.... Masciola keeps pages turning by focusing on Lola's emotional rebellion while providing entertaining details about life in 1923. An entertaining, undemanding time-travel romance." --Kirkus Reviews

"Lola...battles with the mental illness and poor choices that run in her family. Lola finds a portal that transports her to the 1920s.... Masciola clearly defines the eras that Lola inhabits, with unobtrusive references to all aspects of culture. Lola is likable and real in her interactions.... Mental illness and its effects are honestly and sensitively portrayed.... Readers will...care about Lola and want to discover her fate." --School Library Journal

"The novel also explores the fears, prejudices and societal expectations of those coming from a background of mental illness.... The sweet ending is a perfect collision of the past into the present. I am a sucker for a good time-travel romance, and this is a story that will resonate with many readers--teen and adult." --USA Today

"An intriguing book. Lola Lundy is a fabulous character who all can relate to. Each and every one of you will root for this character to get everything she wants. The setting plays a big part in this book and the author depicts it with excellent detail. Well written and I will follow this author in the future." --Night Owl Reviews
 

Children's Literature - Greta Holt
Lola Lundy’s mom was a schizophrenic. She jumped off a bridge, leaving Lola to the sincere but overworked ministrations of social workers and group homes. Lola is not a happy girl: she was a misfit in an ugly school with a broken fountain and a worn out town with unsafe areas. A fire has been set in the school library, and Lola is put on clean-up detail. Alone, she finds a yearbook from 1923, when the school was brand new, the fountain lovely, and the students happy. She falls asleep and wakes up at a dance in the gym in 1923. A wonderfully showy gal named Whoopsie takes her under her flashy wing and asks a million questions while flapper music plays. Lola must do some quick thinking: she tells Whoopsie and her friend Ruby that she is from New York City, thus the strange clothes and shoes. Peter Hemmings, a budding scientist, takes an interest in her and she in him. But the time warp in the library claims her again, and she is forced back into the unforgiving present. She seeks to get back to Peter and 1923, and stay there. Along the way, she interacts with the eccentric Miss Bryant, who runs a sort of historical society; the sincere and overworked Mrs. Hershey; and a self-serving therapist, who would be happy to prove that Lola is as crazy as her mom. Masciola approaches the subject of mental health with compassion and suspense. Is Lola really traveling through time or is she heartbreakingly out of her mind? The details of the 20s time period are fun, especially the music, the expectation of early marriages, and the descriptions of the clothes. Masciola’s portrayals of the adults are realistic and compassionate, as they struggle to understand Lola, love her, or get something from her. There are a few muddled moments and one-dimensional mean girls, but readers will want Lola to fight to have a real life—one in which she truly belongs—and their reward will be an ending that is simply lovely. Peter is worth all of Lola’s hassle. Reviewer: Greta Holt; Ages 14 up.
VOYA, October 2015 (Vol. 38, No. 4) - Donna L Phillips
Sixteen (or is she seventeen?)-year-old Lola Lundy lives in two worlds—or rather, one world in two different times. The juncture between them is the Reference Room of her high school library where orphaned Lola finds a 1924 yearbook amid the soggy ruins she is assigned to clean up after a mysterious fire. The present world has been nothing but trouble, and Lola has returned the favor. Her schizophrenic mother committed suicide, and the adults in her life are waiting for Lola to crack. Failing at school and work, she has no answer to their question, “What will you do?” She falls asleep at her cleaning chores and awakens in 1923 for one wonderful evening with Peter Hemmings, her perfect beau. Like Cinderella, the magic ends at midnight, and Lola is left with more time traveling to do, leading even Lola to question her sanity and wonder where life will finally drop her off. Masciola writes a solid debut novel that teen girls will love. Though the plot is full of contrivances and minor characters drive the action, the suspense and surprises will keep readers eager to learn how the story ends. Shifts to an omniscient point of view late in the book work well to close the narrative. The usual time-travel misunderstandings will invite teens to compare and contrast the 20-teens and the Roaring Twenties. With the exception of Lola’s Sunday shopping spree, the depictions of 1924 ring true. Reviewer: Donna L Phillips; Ages 12 to 18.
School Library Journal
10/01/2015
Gr 9 Up—Lola lives in a group home and battles with the mental illness and poor choices that run in her family. While cleaning a fire-damaged library room, Lola finds a portal that transports her to the 1920s, where she hangs with a cool crowd and falls in love. Masciola clearly defines the eras that Lola inhabits, with unobtrusive references to all aspects of culture. Readers may be confused as to whether the protagonist is truly time traveling or these experiences are the result of her rocky mental state, as Lola hallucinates and acts erratically during a meeting with her present-day psychiatrist. Yet two women in the present, her social worker and a friend from the past, see evidence of Lola's time travel. A yearbook that Lola finds while cleaning the library room provides tangible evidence of her time travel, too. Lola is likable and real in her interactions with a thrift store manager, her social worker and therapists, and Whoopsie, a 1920s friend. Other characters, such as Lola's current roommate and her 1920s benefactors are one-dimensional. Mental illness and its effects are honestly and sensitively portrayed, but the time-travel element muddles the story. Readers will likely overlook the flaws, however, because they care about Lola and want to discover her fate. VERDICT An additional purchase where there is a high demand for romance-infused science fiction.—Hilary Writt, Sullivan University, Lexington, KY
Kirkus Reviews
2015-08-31
A troubled girl in foster care believes she has finally found where she belongs when she travels in time back to 1923. Lola's mother has been mentally ill since Lola was a young child. She now lives in a group home in her small Midwestern town but acts out in rebellion. Assigned to clean out an old room in her school's library, she finds a high school yearbook and becomes fascinated with it, suddenly finding herself back in the 1920s at a school dance. She meets Peter but inadvertently travels back to the present. She's desperate to return to 1923, where she feels she belongs, and to Peter, who she believes is the boy for her. At last she manages to return and stay in the 1920s for several months, making friends, especially with the daring flapper Whoopsie. Her unfamiliarity with the history and science of the era leads to some stumbles, and she misses modern conveniences. Lola convinces Peter that she has traveled through time, and the two decide to eliminate the possibility that she might again return to the present, with results that add real suspense to the story. Masciola keeps pages turning by focusing on Lola's emotional rebellion while providing entertaining details about life in 1923. The time travel feels arbitrary, but it works, and an ending twist neatly resolves the story. An entertaining, undemanding time-travel romance. (Science fiction. 12-18)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781440588976
Publisher:
Adams Media
Publication date:
11/15/2015
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
740,035
Product dimensions:
5.60(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.90(d)
Lexile:
HL750L (what's this?)
Age Range:
14 - 18 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Carol Masciola was a first-place winner of the PEN/West Literary Award in Journalism and a former reporter for the Los Angeles Times and the Orange County Register (California). Her feature screenplay The Fiery Depths, a supernatural thriller set in a haunted convent in the Alps, is in development with Clever Girl Productions, Los Angeles.

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The Yearbook 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
matiij More than 1 year ago
I thoroughly enjoyed this book! It was a great read and a real page-turner. I felt myself relating to teen Lola and her inner monologue was fairly reminiscent to my own at that age. The writing was clever and engaging and kept me reading to the end. I highly recommend this for persons of any age as I think everyone has a fantasy of living in a different time, this book allows you to indulge in your most far-fetched of dreams. Without giving any more away - I'll leave it at this; The Yearbook will lead you down a romantic and dreamy path, one that will stick with you even after you've finished the book.
dnrmom9394 More than 1 year ago
great fast read--characters really come to life. I love the descriptions of life in the 1920's. one can really relate to lola and root for her during the story. the ending is fabulous!
NJ_Mom More than 1 year ago
Loved everything about this book. You really feel for Lola and her totally screwed up life. Everyone has let her down. But you know from the beginning, even though she's been beat up by life and the system, she's a great person. She's goes back to the 20's and you can picture everything so well with the period details the author provides. I don't want to give away what happens because it will ruin the story for you, but I loved Lola and raced through the pages to find out if she would find her happiness. You won't regret reading this book!