The Year's Best Science Fiction: Seventh Annual Collection
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The Year's Best Science Fiction: Seventh Annual Collection

by Gardner Dozois
     
 

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Reaching from the sky to the edge of the world, science fiction is the literature of the imagination, and this year's collection gathers into one volume the most imaginative, exciting, and intelligent fiction of 1989. This year's collection features works by many of science fiction's greatest writers--both veterans and newcomers--including: Neal Barret, Jr.,

Overview

Reaching from the sky to the edge of the world, science fiction is the literature of the imagination, and this year's collection gathers into one volume the most imaginative, exciting, and intelligent fiction of 1989. This year's collection features works by many of science fiction's greatest writers--both veterans and newcomers--including: Neal Barret, Jr., Gregory Benford, Alan Brennert, John Crowley, Avram Davidson, Alexander Jablokov, Janet Kagan, William King, Kathe Koja, Nancy Kress, Megan Lindholm, Judith Moffett, Steven Popkes, Mike Resnick, Robert Sampson, Charles Sheffield, Lucius Shepard, Robert Silverberg, S.P. Somtow, Brian Stableford, Bruce Sterling, Michael Swanwick, John Varley, Connie Willis.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Dozois's Year's Best, like any successful representative of a large constituency, sometimes suffers from blandness and inconsistency. As usual, it's oversized23 stories, nearly 600 pagesand includes a variety of types of SF as well as near-horror, fantasy and humor. Five of the stories are final nominees for Nebulas, and two new ``Hainish'' stories by Ursula LeGuin were nominated for Tiptree Awards; ``The Matter of Segrri'' won. No story here is less than competent and professional; but, with a few exceptions, there is a voiceless sameness in the writing, practically a house style, that over so many pages grows tedious. (Nearly half the stories, by page count, come from the Dozois-edited Asimov's Science Fiction.) A number are flawed (``hard'' SF stories about ``aliens'' that think just like humans) or unremarkable, but these are outweighed by many fine pieces and by standouts such as LeGuin's ``Forgiveness Day,'' perhaps the best story in the book; Eliot Fintushel's ``New Wave''-like ``Ylem''; William Sanders's ``Going After Old Man Alabama'' and Terry Bisson's ``The Hole in the Hole,'' both of which are winning and funny; Katherine Kerr's chilling ``Asylum''; and Michael Bishop's grand and humane ``Cri de Coeur.'' Dozois's intelligently and ably put-together anthology does its stated job as well as any one book or editor could. Even with competition, it would still be the best of the Best. (July)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781466829466
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
05/15/1990
Series:
Year's Best Science Fiction Series , #7
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
598
Sales rank:
983,704
File size:
1 MB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

GARDNER DOZOIS has been working in the science fiction field for more than thirty years. For twenty years he was the editor of Asimov's Science Fiction, during which he received the Hugo Award for Best Editor fifteen times.


Gardner Dozois, one of the most acclaimed editors in science-fiction, has won the Hugo Award for Best Editor 15 times. He was the editor of Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine for 20 years. He is the editor of the Year’s Best Science Fiction anthologies and co-editor of the Warrior anthologies, Songs of the Dying Earth, and many others. As a writer, Dozois twice won the Nebula Award for best short story. He lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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