The Yippy, Yappy Yorkie in the Green Doggy Sweater

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Overview

What happens when you combine:

A girl named Ellen who has just moved to a new neighborhood; A yippy, yappy Yorkie named Baxter who disappears from Ellen’s new yard; And a new neighborhood that doesn’t look anything like their old one Blossom Street?

For Ellen and Baxter, it’s a moving day that turns into something very special, with many happy discoveries.

In their second Blossom Street Kids picture book, New ...

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Overview

What happens when you combine:

A girl named Ellen who has just moved to a new neighborhood; A yippy, yappy Yorkie named Baxter who disappears from Ellen’s new yard; And a new neighborhood that doesn’t look anything like their old one Blossom Street?

For Ellen and Baxter, it’s a moving day that turns into something very special, with many happy discoveries.

In their second Blossom Street Kids picture book, New York Times bestselling author Debbie Macomber and Mary Lou Carney share a charming and heartwarming tale about embarking on new adventures and finding friends in unexpected places.

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—The cover portrait of the title character compels readers to open this moving-to-a-new-house tale. Ellen is apprehensive about her new neighborhood, and then her pup runs away. As she and Mom search for him, their encounters with friendly shopkeepers help the girl warm to her new environment. Naughty Baxter is finally found in the company of another Yorkie, whose owner befriends Ellen. April admires Baxter's outfit, and when Ellen replies that she knit it for him, April asks to be taught how. Lambert's realistic paintings offer an idyllic village of friendly folk. Children will enjoy this cozy story.—Gay Lynn Van Vleck, Henrico County Library, Glen Allen, VA
Kirkus Reviews
Macomber and Carney team up for their second entry in the Blossom Street Kids series, this time focusing on an unwanted move to a new neighborhood for a girl named Ellen and her Yorkshire terrier named Baxter. Ellen is reluctant to leave her familiar house, her friends and the local shop owners she has befriended, including the yarn shop where she learned to knit. Once settled in their new house, her woes increase when Baxter the Yorkie escapes from the back yard while wearing the bright green sweater that Ellen knit for him. Ellen and her mother visit the shops in their new neighborhood, repeating over and over to each owner in turn, "Have you seen a yippy, yappy Yorkie in a green doggy sweater?" They find Baxter in the flower shop, where he has found a Yorkie friend for himself and her owner, a little girl who befriends Ellen. The story is completely predictable and nearly devoid of any suspense or humor, and even the two Yorkies don't offer much spunk to spice things up. Soft-focus watercolor illustrations convey Ellen's sad feelings, but there is little motion or excitement, just pretty rooms and shops and a tiny dog that fades into the backgrounds rather than driving the action. This yippy, yappy Yorkie is just another tired puppy in search of a plot. (Picture book. 4-7)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061650963
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 12/27/2011
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 823,738
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.30 (w) x 10.22 (h) x 0.38 (d)

Meet the Author

Debbie Macomber

Debbie Macomber has more than 100 million copies of her books in print, and her stories about home and family have a worldwide audience and have been translated into twenty-three languages. In addition to being a #1 New York Times bestseller in fiction many times over, she also has an enormous following among knitters as the author of dozens of pattern and craft books. In 2008, she launched a branded line of knitting products through Leisure Arts, the company that publishes her knitting guides. Debbie and her husband, Wayne, have four children and nine grandchildren, and split their time between Washington State and Florida. This is Debbie’s second picture book co-authored with Mary Lou Carney; their first, The Truly Terribly Horrible Sweaer . . . That Grandma Knit, was published in 2009.

Sally Anne Lambert has illustrated a number of children’s books, including The Story of the Easter Bunny and The Story of the Leprechaun by Katherine Tegen; Gator Gumbo: A Spicy-Hot Tale by Candace Fleming; and Barkus, Sly and the Golden Egg by Angela McAllister. Ms. Lambert lives in Liverpool, England. You can visit her online at www.sallyannelambert.com.

Mary Lou Carney is the editor of two magazines for young people—Guideposts for Teens and Guideposts for Kids. She is the author of several picture books for the Christian and educational markets, including Bubble Gum & Chalk Dust: Prayers and Poems for Teachers, and Absolutely Angels: Poems for Children and Other Believers (Boyds Mills Press). This is Mary Lou’s second picture book coauthored with Debbie; their first, The Truly Terribly Horrible Sweaer . . . That Grandma Knit, was published in 2009.

Biography

Publishing did not come easy to self-described "creative speller" Debbie Macomber. When Macomber decided to follow her dreams of becoming a bestselling novelist, she had a lot of obstacles in her path. For starters, Macomber is dyslexic. On top of this, she had only a high school degree, four young children at home, and absolutely no connections in the publishing world. If there's one thing you can say about Debbie Macomber, however, it is that she does not give up. She rented a typewriter and started writing, determined to break into the world of romance fiction.

The years went on and the rejection letters piled up. Her family was living on a shoestring budget, and Debbie was beginning to think that her dreams of being a novelist might never be fulfilled. She began writing for magazines to earn some extra money, and she eventually saved up enough to attend a romance writer's conference with three hundred other aspiring novelists. The organizers of the conference picked ten manuscripts to review in a group critique session. Debbie was thrilled to learn that her manuscript would be one of the novels discussed.

Her excitement quickly faded when an editor from Harlequin tore her manuscript to pieces in front of the crowded room, evoking peals of laughter from the assembled writers. Afterwards, Macomber approached the editor and asked her what she could do to improve her novel. "Throw it away," the editor suggested.

Many writers would have given up right then and there, but not Macomber. The deeply religious Macomber took a lesson from Job and gathered strength from adversity. She returned home and mailed one last manuscript to Silhouette, a publisher of romance novels. "It cost $10 to mail it off," Macomber told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel in 2000. "My husband was out of work at this time, in Alaska, trying to find a job. The children and I were living on his $250-a-week unemployment, and I can't tell you what $10 was to us at that time."

It turned out to be the best $10 Macomber ever spent. In 1984, Silhouette published her novel, Heartsong. (Incidentally, although Heartsong was Macomber's first sale, she actually published another book, Starlight, before Heartsong went to print.) Heartsong went on to become the first romance novel to ever be reviewed in Publishers Weekly, and Macomber was finally on her way.

Today, Macomber is one of the most widely read authors in America. A regular on the New York Times bestseller charts, she is best known for her Cedar Cove novels, a heartwarming story sequence set in a small town in Washington state, and for her Knitting Books series, featuring a group of women who patronize a Seattle yarn store. In addition, her backlist of early romances, including several contemporary Westerns, has been reissued with great success.

Macomber has made a successful transition from conventional romance to the somewhat more flexible genre known as "women's fiction." "I was at a point in my life where I found it difficult to identify with a 25-year-old heroine," Macomber said in an interview with ContemporaryRomanceWriters.com. "I found that I wanted to write more about the friendships women share with each other." To judge from her avid, ever-increasing fan base, Debbie's readers heartily approve.

Good To Know

Some outtakes from our interview with Macomber:

"I'm dyslexic, although they didn't have a word for it when I was in grade school. The teachers said I had 'word blindness.' I've always been a creative speller and never achieved good grades in school. I graduated from high school but didn't have the opportunity to attend college, so I did what young women my age did at the time -- I married. I was a teenager, and Wayne and I (now married nearly 37 years) had four children in five years."

"I'm a yarnaholic. That means I have more yarn stashed away than any one person could possibly use in three or four lifetimes. There's something inspiring about yarn that makes me feel I could never have enough. Often I'll go into my yarn room (yes, room!) and just hold skeins of yarn and dream about projects. It's a comforting thing to do."

"My office walls are covered with autographs of famous writers -- it's what my children call my ‘dead author wall.' I have signatures from Mark Twain, Earnest Hemingway, Jack London, Harriett Beecher Stowe, Pearl Buck, Charles Dickens, Rudyard Kipling, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, to name a few."

"I'm morning person, and rip into the day with a half-mile swim (FYI: a half mile is a whole lot farther in the water than it is on land) at the local pool before I head into the office, arriving before eight. It takes me until nine or ten to read through all of the guest book entries from my web site and the mail before I go upstairs to the turret where I do my writing. Yes, I write in a turret -- is that romantic, or what? I started blogging last September and really enjoy sharing bits and pieces of my life with my readers. Once I'm home for the day, I cook dinner, trying out new recipes. Along with cooking, I also enjoy eating, especially when the meal is accompanied by a glass of good wine. Wayne and I take particular pleasure in sampling eastern Washington State wines (since we were both born and raised in that part of the state).

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    1. Hometown:
      Port Orchard, Washington
    1. Date of Birth:
      October 22, 1948
    2. Place of Birth:
      Yakima, Washington
    1. Education:
      Graduated from high school in 1966; attended community college
    2. Website:

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