The Zen of Tea

The Zen of Tea

by Okakura Kakuzō
     
 
The original pamphlet (too short to be called a book) targets a western audience, it was originally written in English and is one of the great English Tea classics. Okakura had been taught at a young age to speak English and was proficient at communicating his thoughts to the Western mind.
I've decided to republish this little classic with lot of extra editorial

Overview

The original pamphlet (too short to be called a book) targets a western audience, it was originally written in English and is one of the great English Tea classics. Okakura had been taught at a young age to speak English and was proficient at communicating his thoughts to the Western mind.
I've decided to republish this little classic with lot of extra editorial as a printed booklet and as an eBook with colorful illustrations. This was in part to honor the author by resurrecting his work and in part of my goal to promote the philosophy of Zen and offer a small bridge between the mind of the East and West. I hope this lens will help me accomplishing this goal.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940014322409
Publisher:
Ancient Wisdom Publications
Publication date:
03/13/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
94
File size:
293 KB

Meet the Author

The author of The Book of Tea is also known as Okakura Tenshin was Born in Yokohama to parents originally from Fukui, Kakuzo attended Tokyo Imperial University, where he first met and studied under Ernest Fenollosa. In 1889, Okakura co-founded the periodical Kokka (國華). A year later he was one of the principal founders of the first Japanese fine-arts academy, the Tokyo School of Fine Arts (東京美術学校 Tōkyō Bijutsu Gakkō), and a year later became its head, although he was later ousted from the school in an administrative struggle. Later, he also founded the Japan Art Institute with Hashimoto Gahō and Yokoyama Taikan. He was invited by William Sturgis Bigelow to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston in 1904 and became the first head of the Asian art division in 1910.
Okakura was a high-profile urbanite who had an international sense of self. In the Meiji period he was the first dean of the Tokyo Fine Arts School that later merged with the Tokyo Music School to form the current Tokyo University of the Arts.
He wrote all of his main works in English.

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