Their Morals and Ours

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Overview

Participating in the revolutionary workers movement "with open eyes and an intense will-only this can give the highest moral satisfaction to a thinking being," Trotsky writes. He explains how morality is rooted in the interests of contending social classes. With a reply by the pragmatist philosopher John Dewey and a Marxist response to Dewey by George Novack.

Index, Glossary

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More About This Book

Overview

Participating in the revolutionary workers movement "with open eyes and an intense will-only this can give the highest moral satisfaction to a thinking being," Trotsky writes. He explains how morality is rooted in the interests of contending social classes. With a reply by the pragmatist philosopher John Dewey and a Marxist response to Dewey by George Novack.

Index, Glossary

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780873483193
  • Publisher: Pathfinder Press GA
  • Publication date: 1/1/1974
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 5
  • Pages: 94
  • Product dimensions: 5.30 (w) x 8.27 (h) x 0.36 (d)

Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2003

    Whose Morality?

    Written on the eve of World War II, this piece defends revolutionary Marxism and revolutionary morality against progressive-minded detractors, i.e. disillusioned former Marxists who falsely claim the horrific crimes of Stalin were the logical outcome of Lenin's and the Bolsheviks' policies. In refuting these detractors, Trotsky explains that 'morality more than any other form of ideology has a class character.' Thus, it was 'moral' according to U.S. rulers to use atomic bombs against Japanese cities when Japan had already sought to surrender in World War II and it's OK to threaten countries today with them. But it's 'immoral' for North Korea or other countries to seek to develop atomic bombs to defend themselves. The imperialist 'war on terrorism' is a current example. According to ruling class 'morality' it's perfectly moral for the Israeli rulers to murder Palestinian leaders and people as it occupies Palestine. It's OK for the U.S. and U.K rulers to murder Iraqis. But it's Not OK for the Palestinians or people of Iraq to defend themselves and seek to end occupation of their lands.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2003

    Whose Morality?

    Written on the eve of World War II, this piece defends revolutionary Marxist and revolutionary morality against progressive-minded detractors, i.e. disillusioned former Marxists who claim the horrific crimes of Stalin were the logical outcome of Lenin's and the Bolsheviks' policies. In refuting these detractors, Trotsky explains that 'morality more than any other form of ideology has a class character.' Thus, it was 'moral' according to U.S. rulers to use atomic bombs against Japanese cities when Japan had already sought to surrender in World War II and it's OK to threaten countries today with them. But it's 'immoral' for North Korea or other countries to seek to develop atomic bombs to defend themselves.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2003

    Which Side Are You On?

    Claims to the moral high ground by ruling classes fill the pages of history through today. Their crimes against humanity are morally justified to the masses. This book delves into the class underpinnings of all moral function. Their Morals and Ours is a valuable help to thinking through what is morality, its roots and changes. Leon Trotsky, a great Marxist and John Dewey, a great liberal pragmatist debate these questions on the eve of World War II. Stalinism, wars, the ten commandments, strikes, taking of hostages, marriage relations, means and ends, and common sense are some of the subjects discussed. The morality of capitalism vs. the morality of the working-class struggle for liberation from capitalism are counterposed.

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