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Theodore Roosevelt and World Order: Police Power in International Relations
     

Theodore Roosevelt and World Order: Police Power in International Relations

by James R Holmes
 

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Theodore Roosevelt and World Order presents a new understanding of TR's political philosophy while shedding light on some of today's most vexing foreign policy dilemmas. Most know that Roosevelt served as New York police commissioner during the 1890s, warring on crime while sponsoring reforms that reflected his good-government convictions. Later Roosevelt

Overview

Theodore Roosevelt and World Order presents a new understanding of TR's political philosophy while shedding light on some of today's most vexing foreign policy dilemmas. Most know that Roosevelt served as New York police commissioner during the 1890s, warring on crime while sponsoring reforms that reflected his good-government convictions. Later Roosevelt became an accomplished diplomat. Yet it has escaped attention that TR's perspectives on domestic and foreign affairs fused under the legal concept of "police power."

This gap in our understanding of Roosevelt's career deserves to be filled. Why? TR is strikingly relevant to our own age. His era shares many features with that of the twenty-first century, notably growing economic interdependence, failed states unable or unwilling to discharge their sovereign responsibilities, and terrorism from an international anarchist movement that felled Roosevelt's predecessor, William McKinley. Roosevelt exercised his concept of police power to manage the newly acquired Philippines and Cuba, to promote Panama's independence from Colombia, and to defuse international crises in Venezuela and Morocco. Since the end of the Cold War, and especially in the post-9/11 era, American statesmen and academics have been grappling with the problem of how to buoy up world order. While not all of Roosevelt's philosophy is applicable to today's world, this book provides useful historical examples of international intervention and a powerful analytical tool for understanding how a great power should respond to world events.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"In Theodore Roosevelt and World Order, James Holmes provides a thoughtful and elegantly written account of a period in American history that has been largely forgotten, even by international relations specialists. Yet, as he convincingly argues, it has many parallels with the present and holds interesting lessons. Holmes shows that TR's doctrine of 'the international police power' is a useful analytical tool for exploring the challenges facing the United States today in deploying its power abroad to enforce international norms and build state capabilities. Must reading for anyone interested in the contemporary debate over American 'imperialism.'"

"James Holmes gives us the first detailed historical analysis of the origins and meaning of Theodore Roosevelt's notion of the United States exercising 'an international police power.' He then assesses in a clear, balanced way the applicability of this concept to our present world situation, in which the 'chronic wrongdoing' or 'impotence' of failing states may seem to invite humanitarian intervention. Roosevelt's 'responsibility to protect' doctrine has its origins, Holmes fascinatingly shows, in American domestic law and early administrative experience."

"A rather timely look at the ideas of one of the principle founders of modern internationalism . . . This well-documented work (be sure to read the notes, as they are often quite valuable) reviews T.R.'s intellectual roots and his basic ideas about international relations, national power, foreign policy, and international law, using a series of case studies. . . ."

"Holmes makes a convincing argument that the history of American interventionism can be instructive both in terms of understanding and explaining its contemporary incidence as well as illuminating the current and prospective strategies for preemption and state-building."

Carnes Lord

"In Theodore Roosevelt and World Order, James Holmes provides a thoughtful and elegantly written account of a period in American history that has been largely forgotten, even by international relations specialists. Yet, as he convincingly argues, it has many parallels with the present and holds interesting lessons. Holmes shows that TR's doctrine of 'the international police power' is a useful analytical tool for exploring the challenges facing the United States today in deploying its power abroad to enforce international norms and build state capabilities. Must reading for anyone interested in the contemporary debate over American 'imperialism.'"—Carnes Lord, professor of military and naval strategy, Naval War College, and author of The Modern Prince: What Leaders Need to Know Now
Alan K. Henrikson

"James Holmes gives us the first detailed historical analysis of the origins and meaning of Theodore Roosevelt's notion of the United States exercising 'an international police power.' He then assesses in a clear, balanced way the applicability of this concept to our present world situation, in which the 'chronic wrongdoing' or 'impotence' of failing states may seem to invite humanitarian intervention. Roosevelt's 'responsibility to protect' doctrine has its origins, Holmes fascinatingly shows, in American domestic law and early administrative experience."—Alan K. Henrikson, associate professor of diplomatic history, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University
NYMAS Review

"A rather timely look at the ideas of one of the principle founders of modern internationalism . . . This well-documented work (be sure to read the notes, as they are often quite valuable) reviews T.R.'s intellectual roots and his basic ideas about international relations, national power, foreign policy, and international law, using a series of case studies."—NYMAS Review
H-Net Reviews in the Humanities & Social Sciences

"Holmes makes a convincing argument that the history of American interventionism can be instructive both in terms of understanding and explaining its contemporary incidence as well as illuminating the current and prospective strategies for preemption and state-building."—H-Net Reviews in the Humanities & Social Sciences

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781612343051
Publisher:
Potomac Books Inc.
Publication date:
01/31/2006
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
4 MB

Meet the Author

James R. Holmes is a senior research associate at the University of Georgia Center for International Trade and Security and teaches international relations in the university’s honors program. A former Navy officer and combat veteran of Desert Storm, he received his doctorate from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. He lives in Athens, Georgia.

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