Theoretical Advances in Behavior Genetics

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9789400985780
  • Publisher: Springer Netherlands
  • Publication date: 12/31/2013
  • Series: Nato Science Series D: (closed), #2
  • Edition description: Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1979
  • Pages: 722
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 1.45 (d)

Table of Contents

Prologue.: The Need for unifying Theory.- Keynote Address: Genes, Molecules, Onganisms and Behavior.- Behavioral genetics and the general theory of evolution.- Molecular genetics of a stimulus-response system.- Whitaker’s model of peripheral and central language systems.- Genetics, speech, and language.- Culture in non-human animals.- Two-way communication between man, chimpanzee and gorilla.- References.- I Evolutionary Theory and Behavior.- The Experimental Approach to Behavioral Evolution.- Alternative approaches.- The intra-specific approach.- Natural and artificial selection.- Stabilising selection.- Directional selection.- Experimental evidence.- Applications to behavior.- A survey of the genetic architecture of animal behavior.- Early attempts.- Heritability.- Construction of the present survey.- Features of the present survey.- Conclusions from the present survey.- References.- Tables.- Comment by N. D. Henderson.- Comment by J. H. F. van Abeelen.- Comment by K. Immelmann.- Comment by D. A. Hay.- References.- Ethotogy and the. Genetic Foundation of Animal Behaviour.- The naturalistic approach.- Innate behavioral differences.- Stereotyped behavior.- Causation.- Choice of phenotypes.- Behavior genetics at the population level.- Comparative and hybridization studies.- Biometrical approaches.- Ethological barriers.- Aggressive behavior and spacing.- Phenogenetics.- Single-gene studies.- Neurophysiological correlates.- Summary and conclusions.- References.- Comment by P. L. Broadhurst.- Comment by K. Immelmann.- Comment by D. Thiessen.- Comment by A. Oliverio.- Comment by D. A. Hay.- Reply to D. A. Hay by J. H. F. van Abeelen.- References.- Genetical Constraints on Early Learning: A Perspective From Sexual Imprinting in Birds.- Sexual imprinting in Zebra Finches.- Termination of sensitive phases.- Discussion.- References.- Comment by J. L. Fuller.- Comment by P. L. Broadhurst.- Comment by J. N. Thompson, Jr.- II Molecular Biology.- A Genetic Approach to Behavioral Plasticity and Rigidity.- A comparative approach to behavioral specialization and generalization.- Brain maturity at birth and behavioral rigidity and plasticity.- A genetic approach to behavioral individuality.- Phenotypic differences at the brain and behavioral level.- A genetic approach to behavioral maturity at birth.- Behavioral rigidity and plasticity.- Conclusions — A theoretical approach to behavioral plasticity.- Summary.- References.- Comment by D. Thiessen.- Biological Trends in Behavior Genetics.- Individual differences, preadaptations and behavior.- Gene canalization of behavioral polymorphism.- The evolution of sex and variability.- Genetic variance as tools of the trade.- Differential expression of genes in behavior.- Sociobiology as a framework for behavior genetics.- Summary.- References.- Comment by J. H. F. van Abeelen.- Comment by J. R. Royce.- Comment by J. N. Thompson, Jr.- Comment by A. Oliverio.- References.- Familiar Likeness: Etiology and Function.- Environmental models of family transmission: human data.- Environmental models of cultural transmission: animal data.- Function.- Conclusions.- References.- Comment by R. E. Stafford.- Comment by S. G. Vandenberg.- Comment by J. C. Loehlin.- References.- Adaptive, Significance of animal behavior: The role of gene-environment interaction.- Genetic architecture and its relationship to natural selection.- Sampling genetic material.- Sampling dependent variables.- Sampling strategies for rearing environments.- Predicting interactions with genotype.- Conclusions.- References.- Comment by D. Wahlsten.- Comment by J. L. Fuller.- Comment by G. Whitney.- Comment by D. A. Hay.- Comment by P. L. Broadhurst.- Reply to Comments - N. D. Henderson.- References.- IV Genetic Models.- Combining Data From Different Groups in Human Behavior Genetics.- Introduction: Two strategies.- Some history: Modeling IQ.- Modeling assortative mating and errors of measurement.- An example from the Texas adoption study.- Summary and conclusions.- References.- Comment by D. W. Fulker.- References.- Some, Implications of Biometrical Genetical Analysis for Psychological Research.- Strain Studies.- Genotype-environment interactions.- Genetic correlations.- Crossbreeding, gene-action and adaptive significance.- Gene action and genotype-environment interaction.- Social interactions.- Genetic and environmental architecture of human personality.- General model.- Normal personality traits.- Schizophrenia.- Genetic and environmental factor structure.- Sex x genotype interaction.- Genetic and environmental architecture of human cognition.- Additional complexities in the general model.- Multivariate analysis of environmental influences.- Longitudinal analysis of genetic and environmental determinants of SES.- Summary.- References.- Comment by J. C. deFries.- Reply to J. C. DeFries by D. W. Fulker.- Comment by D. Hay.- Comment by J. C. Loehlin.- Reply to J. C. Loehlin by D. W. Fulker.- References.- Genetic Correlations, Environmental Correlations, and Behavior.- Quantitative genetic model.- Estimation of genetic and environmental correlations.- Behavioral examples.- Twin studies.- Animal studies.- Hawaii family study of cognition.- Factor-gene model.- Summary and conclusions.- References.- Comment by J. C. Loehlin.- Comment by A. Oliverio.- Comment by J. R. Royce.- Reply to J. C. Loehlin by J. C. Defries, A. R. Kuse, and S. G. Vandenberg.- References.- V Methodological and Conceptual Issues.- A Critique of the Concept of Heritability and Heredity in Behavioral Genetics.- The current conception of heredity and heritability.- A critique of heritability.- Confounding of heredity and environment.- Confounding of heredity and environment.- Interaction of heredity and environment.- Heritability versus plasticity.- Conclusion.- A critique of gene theory of heredity.- Historical overview.- Non-Mendelian inheritance.- Distinguishing Mendelian from non-Mendelian inheritance.- Genes and additivity of heredity and environment.- An alternative formulation of heredity.- The analysis of heredity and behavior.- Detecting variation in heredity.- The dissection of heredity.- Mendelian analysis.- Salvaging heritability.- References.- Comment by J. L. Fuller.- Comment by D. D. Thiessen.- Comment by J. C. Loehlin.- Comment by E. Caspari.- Comment by P. L. Broadhurst.- Comment by J. H. F. van Abeelen.- Comment by J. R. Royce.- Reply to comments - D. Wahlsten.- References.- The Taxonomy of Psychophenes.- Classification in the behavioral sciences.- A classification of phenotypes.- What makes a good phenotype.- Ostensible psychophenes.- Genetic variability of ostensible psychophenes.- Situational and temporal variability of ostensible psychophenes.- Inferred psychophenes.- Factor analysis.- Rating scales.- Syndromes.- Choice of psychophene and genetic analysis.- Monogenic and polygenic regulation.- Are inferred psychophenes real.- Factors, genetic communalities and environments.- Summary.- References.- Comment by J. R. Royce.- Comment by J. H. F. van Abeelen.- Comment by D. Thiessen.- Comment by P. Broadhurst.- Comment by D. Wahlsten.- Comment by D. Hay.- Reply to comments - J. L. Fuller.- References.- VI Psychological Theory.- Genetic Models, Theory of Personality and the Unification of Psychology.- Psychology as the study of organisms.- General laws and individual differences.- Personality as a natural science concept.- Theory of genetics.- Genetic models in personality research.- Genetics and psychological research.- Future uses of genetic models.- Diversity and inequality.- References.- Comment by W. J. Baker.- Reply to Baker by H. J. Eysenck.- Comment by S. G. Vandenberg.- Reply to Vandenberg by H. J. Eysenck.- Comment by D. Wahlsten.- Reply to Wahlsten by H. J. Eysenck.- Comment by J. R. Royce.- Reply to Royce by H. J. Eysenck.- References.- The, Genetics of Information Processing.- Information processing theories and methods.- Information processing and reading disability.- Information processing and aging.- Information processing and alcohol sensitivity.- An individual differences perspective on information processing.- The Hawaii study of the genetics of information processing.- Summary and conclusions.- References.- Comment by K. V. Wilson.- Comment by J. R. Royce.- Comment by J. H. F. van Abeelen.- Comment by D. Wahlsten.- References.- The Factor-Gene Basis OF Individuality.- Individuality theory.- A brief overview.- The structure of individuality.- Individuality dynamics.- The current status, prospects, and limitations of the theory.- The factor-gene model.- Factors and the problem of behavioral phenotypes.- The relationship between factors and genes.- The life-span development of factors.- The concept of heredity and environment dominant factors.- The empirical findings for each of the six systems.- The cognitive system.- The affective system.- The style system.- The value system.- The sensory system.- The motor system.- Heredity, environment, and individuality.- Summary and conclusions.- References.- Comment by H. J. Eysenck.- Reply to H. J. Eysenck by J. R. Royce.- Comment by S. G. Vandenberg.- Reply to S. G. Vandenberg by J. R. Royce.- References.- Epilogue, The Goals and Future of Behavior, Genetics.- The background and scope of behavior genetics.- Progress in quantitative genetics.- Behavioral phenotypes.- Behavioral phenogenetics.- The nature/nurture problem.- Resume.- Summary.- References.- Participants.- Author Index.

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