There Is No Suffering: A Commentary on the Heart Sutra

Overview

The Heart Sutra, just over a page long, distills the teachings of the Buddha to their purest essence. Perhaps the best known of all Buddhist sutras, it is recited in Buddhist centers and monasteries around the world. Emphasizing a living wisdom directly experienced, the schools of Chan have revered the Heart Sutra for its concise expression of the core revelations of the Buddha.

There Is No Suffering is Chan Master Sheng-yen's commentary on the Heart Sutra. He speaks on the ...

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Overview

The Heart Sutra, just over a page long, distills the teachings of the Buddha to their purest essence. Perhaps the best known of all Buddhist sutras, it is recited in Buddhist centers and monasteries around the world. Emphasizing a living wisdom directly experienced, the schools of Chan have revered the Heart Sutra for its concise expression of the core revelations of the Buddha.

There Is No Suffering is Chan Master Sheng-yen's commentary on the Heart Sutra. He speaks on the sutra from the Chan point of view, and presents it as a series of contemplation methods, encouraging readers to experience it directly through meditation and daily life. In this way, reading the Heart Sutra becomes more than just an intellectual exercise; it becomes a method of practice by which one can awaken to the fundamental wisdom inherent within each of us. Whether one wants a better understanding of Buddhist concepts or a deepened meditation practice, this commentary on the Heart Sutra can help.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781556433856
  • Publisher: North Atlantic Books
  • Publication date: 1/28/2002
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 1,404,166
  • Product dimensions: 5.76 (w) x 8.23 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Chan Master Sheng-yen is a Buddhist monk who received transmission in two major Chan lineages. He holds a doctorate in Buddhist literature from Rissho University in Japan. He is the author of over one hundred texts on Buddhism, and his books have been translated into eight languages. He has been lecturing and directing retreats for more than twenty-five years in Asia, North America, and Europe.
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Table of Contents

Prologue 1
The Heart Sutra 7
Commentary on the Heart Sutra 11
The way of Bodhisattva 15
The Five Skandhas 45
Impermanence 53
The Eighteen Realms 61
The Twelve Links of Conditioned Arising 73
The Four Noble Truths 87
Beyond Inverted Views and Dreams 105
The Realization of the Buddhas 113
The Supreme Mantra 115
Epilogue 119
Glossary 123
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2003

    One of the more thorough commentaries of the Heart Sutra

    Of the commentaries I have read for the Heart Sutra, Thich Nhat Hahn's (Heart of Understanding) was the gentlest, The Dalai Lama's quite informative, Hakuin's both artistic and penetrating via imagery, and Master Sheng-yen's the most extensive in teachings. For someone who wishes to expand their knowledge of Buddhism beyond the mere basics with examples drawn from many pragmatic situations of daily life, this book is probably the best. For a more basic run at the Heart Sutra, I would probably try one of the three mentioned above. As a student of Master Sheng-yen, I can attest to the fact that many of the Chinese speaking people in his audiences often spend considerable time drenched in laughter. However, the English translation does tend to go over with a dry thud. If anything is lost in the translation, certainly the humor is first. However, his examples drawn from experience form images which highlight the teachings from a completely different vantage point in one's mind. The firm grip of the intellectual/cognitive mind tends to loosen up a bit, allowing the teachings to settle on a deeper level. Personally, I find the missing gentle laughter of the audience a significant loss when reading his books as opposed to hearing these lectures in person. However, the genuine value of these teachings are still quite accessable.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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