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There Is Nothing Wrong with You for Teens
     

There Is Nothing Wrong with You for Teens

by Cheri Huber, June Shiver (Illustrator)
 

Based on surveys and interviews with hundreds of teenagers about what does and does not work in their lives, how they perceive the adult world they are about to enter, and what they want adults to know about them, There Is Nothing Wrong With You for Teens provides communication techniques to empower teenagers to take the lead in the conversation that must

Overview


Based on surveys and interviews with hundreds of teenagers about what does and does not work in their lives, how they perceive the adult world they are about to enter, and what they want adults to know about them, There Is Nothing Wrong With You for Teens provides communication techniques to empower teenagers to take the lead in the conversation that must happen between teens and adults.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
"I am not here to become an acceptable person—I am here to accept the person I am." Huber states in her preface that this message is one that teens need and deserve to hear. She encourages them to be responsible for themselves, know themselves, and learn to communicate those thoughts to others—all positive messages. It seems odd, however, that these advantages are balanced by a negative message about the adults in teens' lives. At the head of the book's title is "Regardless of What You Were Taught to Believe..." Parents probably mean well, the reader learns, but they teach self-hate (Huber's term) and damaging behavioral patterns. "If your parents could love you the way you want to be loved, it already would have happened." This thought seems to be at odds with the author's recommendation to "practice assuming the best." A workshop leader and teacher of Zen, Huber bases this book on material originally developed for adults, and the seams show. The introduction, taken from correspondence with teens, and the concluding section, techniques for improving communication with parents, feel tacked on. The author assumes that readers will be familiar with terms such as awareness practice, sitting (meditation), and projection. Self-help books for teens are a tricky genre. In this case, the author misses the mark. Her assumption that all readers have unproductive, unsupportive relationships with the adults in their lives weakens her message and limits the audience. Illus. VOYA CODES:2Q 2P J S (Better editing or work by the author might have warranted a 3Q;For the YA with a special interest in the subject;Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9;Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12).2001, Keep It Simple Books, 270p, $12 Trade pb. Ages 12 to 18. Reviewer:Kathleen Beck—VOYA, December 2001 (Vol. 24, No. 5)
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up-Huber explores the Zen perspectives of self-awareness, self-examination, and self-acceptance for this audience with mixed results. She suggests that teens have heard negative comments from their earliest days, which teach a self-hatred that is difficult to refute and leads to attempts to change that fail because they go against an individual's true nature. Instead, she urges readers to accept themselves with compassion. There are kernels of wisdom for those who are willing to delve beneath the psychobabble that permeates this book. For example, Huber says, "We can ask, `What is outside the realm of compassion? What is not cared for?' And we can bring that into the healing light of compassion by simply acknowledging it, accepting it, allowing it." Some teens may respond to this sort of language by using it as an opportunity for self-examination, but others may get swallowed up in the verbiage and be unable to respond in the manner intended by the author. For inclusive self-help collections.-Susan Riley, Mount Kisco Public Library, NY IVERSEN, Eve. Animal Aviators: Masters of Flight. 112p. diags. illus. photos. reprods. further reading. glossary. index. Web sites. CIP. Watts. 2001. PLB $24. ISBN 0-531-11749-9. LC 00-036657. Gr 5-8-This well-written, in-depth exploration of animal flight is marred by inadequate illustrations. Animals that glide, soar, and fly are introduced; detailed explanations of how they take off, stay aloft, maneuver in the air, and land are enhanced by descriptions of the physiology necessary for flight. Chapters on migration and air travel by humans round out the volume. Iversen's obvious fascination with the subject is evident. Unfortunately, her fine writing is not supported with sufficient or attractive illustrations. Black-and-white photos and sketches are small and generally lacking in detail. The few color photos are relegated to two inset sections, far from where they would be useful. Photos or drawings of the Malaysian flying snake, phalangers, and other unfamiliar creatures would have been helpful in understanding the text. Even the three thoughtful projects suggested at the end of the book are difficult to visualize without sketches. It's a shame that only the most determined readers will tackle what could have been a definitive book on the topic for this audience.-Ellen Heath, Orchard School, Ridgewood, NJ Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780963625595
Publisher:
Keep It Simple Books
Publication date:
10/28/2001
Pages:
276
Sales rank:
1,019,236
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.72(d)
Age Range:
14 Years

Meet the Author


Cheri Huber is the author of 19 books, including There Is Nothing Wrong with You, When You're Falling, Dive,and Time-Out for Parents. She founded the Mountain View Zen Center in Mountain View, California, and the Zen Monastery Practice Center in Murphys, California, and teaches in both communities. She travels widely and often, leading workshops and retreats around the United States and abroad, most recently in Costa Rica and Italy. She founded Living Compassion in 2003, a nonprofit group comprised of There Is Nothing Wrong With You Retreats (based on the book); Global Community for Peace: The Assisi Peace Project; The Africa Vulnerable Children Project; and Open Air Talk Radio, her weekly call-in radio show originating from Stanford University. She lives in Murphys, California.

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