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There's a Big Beautiful World Out There!
     

There's a Big Beautiful World Out There!

by Nancy Carlson
 

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There are a lot of things to be scared of, that’s for sure. There are mean-looking dogs, booming thunderstorms, spiders and other creepy crawly things. All this scary stuff may make you want to hide under your covers and never come out. Hiding is easy, but will it really make everything better?

Overview

There are a lot of things to be scared of, that’s for sure. There are mean-looking dogs, booming thunderstorms, spiders and other creepy crawly things. All this scary stuff may make you want to hide under your covers and never come out. Hiding is easy, but will it really make everything better?

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Hits just the right note. . . . Carlson's style works well to address fear without inspiring it. (School Library Journal)

Bouncy, colorful illustrations are simple and strong. . . . This will be a title that can be used for discussion with young children about their fears. (Kirkus Reviews)

Publishers Weekly
Written on September 12, 2001, There's a Big Beautiful World Out There! by Nancy Carlson emphasizes overcoming fear. Though she acknowledges children's anxieties in everyday terms ("There's a lot to be scared of, that's for sure!/ There's that mean looking dog,/ and booming thunderstorms"), she also reminds readers of the good things they miss if they don't venture out ("If you hide under your covers, you won't see the rainbow after the storm").
School Library Journal
PreS-Carlson hits just the right note in this story about a little girl who has to choose between facing frightening things or hiding from them. The outside world includes terrors as varied as a mean-looking dog, bad news stories, and nighttime shadows, but since "hiding under your covers can get pretty boring," this wide-eyed, appealing child ventures out and discovers that the world isn't as scary as it seems. Carlson's style works well to address fear without inspiring it-the colors are characteristically bright and jolly, but there are clashing patterns and hues, the lines are slightly more jagged than usual, and the perspective is sometimes askew. Preschoolers are sure to find the protagonist's worried, but not terrified face a comforting focus on the "scary" pages. Perhaps the most chilling moment in the book is on the last page, which reads: "This book was written on September 12, 2001."-Shelley B. Sutherland, Niles Public Library District, IL Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
This prolific author/illustrator of some of the most beloved characters in picture books comments, through a pig-tailed young girl, about things children could be scared of. Besides the usual-spiders and crawly things, mean looking dogs and thunderstorms-she includes standing up in front of "a whole bunch of people" and "people who look different from you." The illustration for this last scary thing is of people who are different ages and of different races. Then, there are scary stories in the news and the headlines in a newspaper say "Toy Stores Go Out of Business" and "No One Getting Along." Her first solution to these scary things is to hide under the covers and never come out. But that would be boring, so each scary thing is rationalized-maybe the dog only looks mean, you'll miss the rainbow, and you'll miss your mother telling you everything is going to be all right. "And just think of all the new friends you'll never meet! So, throw off those covers! There's a big, beautiful world out there just waiting for you!" The illustrations for these lines depict a campground filled with the people who "are different from you" all having a good time. The last picture is of an American flag at half mast with the sentence: "This book was written on September 12, 2001." Carlson's (Smile a Lot!, p. 877, etc.) bouncy, colorful illustrations are simple and strong. The jacket welcomes all readers with the girl shouting out of a window decorated with cheery curtains and a window box of flowers. There are 16 sentences in all and many of the illustrations depict phrases of a sentence. With the country uneasy about terrorism and headlines adding to the tension, this will be a title that can be used fordiscussion with young children about their fears. (Picture book. 6-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780142401842
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
09/09/2004
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
7.90(w) x 9.42(h) x 0.08(d)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
Hits just the right note. . . . Carlson's style works well to address fear without inspiring it. (School Library Journal)

Bouncy, colorful illustrations are simple and strong. . . . This will be a title that can be used for discussion with young children about their fears. (Kirkus Reviews)

Meet the Author

Nancy Carlson(www.nancycarlson.com) is the popular author and illustrator of many picture books, including How About a Hug?, My Best Friend Moved Away, and Look Out Kindergarten, Here I Come!

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