There's a Dragon in the Library

( 2 )

Overview

"Dianne serves up another hot time as she weaves a tale that sends readers into the 'stacks' to meet a dragon. Complete with rhythmic, rhyming refrains, the story is sure to grab the crowd from the top; the twist at the end seals it! This dragon tale has all the elements to make it a modern classic and a storytelling staple."
—Stephanie Bange, storyteller, children's librarian, and director, Charles and Renate Frydman Educational Resource Center, Wright State University

"Dianne de Las Casas does it again with ...

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Overview

"Dianne serves up another hot time as she weaves a tale that sends readers into the 'stacks' to meet a dragon. Complete with rhythmic, rhyming refrains, the story is sure to grab the crowd from the top; the twist at the end seals it! This dragon tale has all the elements to make it a modern classic and a storytelling staple."
—Stephanie Bange, storyteller, children's librarian, and director, Charles and Renate Frydman Educational Resource Center, Wright State University

"Dianne de Las Casas does it again with another book that's a joy to read out loud even though it gave me the shivers. A library dragon devouring all my favorite books is the scariest thing I can imagine!"
—Eric Kimmel, author, Caldecott Honor Book Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins

"A fantastic tale full of fun and spirit . . . a book truly worthy of classic status for generations to come."
-Feathered Quill Book Reviews

Max loves story time at the library. But he has no idea how exciting the library can be until the day he spies a large, speckled egg sitting on one of the bookshelves. With a loud crack, the egg breaks to reveal a small, seemingly harmless dragon. However, the dragon has a real appetite for books and doesn't stay small for very long.

Max is the only one who can see the dragon munching and crunching on the library's books. Will anyone believe his story before it's too late? Fresh, bright illustrations and Max's "Book Care Tips" complete this fanciful adventure.

Her Royal Highness Dianne de Las Casas is an award-winning author and recording artist. Her work has earned rave reviews from School Library Journal and Kirkus. She performs at schools, libraries, and festivals and is a frequent speaker at national and state library and education conferences. She believes that libraries are enchanted places and once discovered a dragon's egg on a children's librarian's bookshelf! The author of Pelican's The Cajun Cornbread Boy, Madame Poulet and Monsieur Roach, Mama's Bayou, The Gigantic Sweet Potato, The House That Witchy Built, Blue Frog: The Legend of Chocolate, and Dinosaur Mardi Gras, de Las Casas lives with her family in the New Orleans area.

Her Majesty Marita Gentry is a professional artist and illustrator in southern Louisiana. Her vivid illustrations have earned her numerous awards and commissions. An accomplished teacher, she is involved in several artist-in-residence programs each year, helping schools enliven their walls with murals. She believes that the best way to tame a dragon is to read to him-really! This is the fourth book Gentry has dreamed up with Dianne de Las Casas.

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—Max sees a huge egg in the library and watches as a dragon hatches, grows, and begins to eat the books. "The dragon opened his mouth and began to munch./He filled his tummy with books. Crunch. Crunch. Crunch." As the creature gets bigger and bigger, the worried boy warns everyone—the children's librarian, his parents, the head librarian, and his teacher—with no success: "There's a dragon in the library, speckled and green. He's a hungry thing! He's an eating machine!" Finally, when it has become enormous, Max goes outside and finds a policeman and they discover that the library has disappeared—inside the dragon. The story concludes with a list of "Max's Book Care Tips," which are good, sensible rules, along with the last two—"Books are for reading, not for eating" and "Never leave a book unsupervised near a dragon." The final endpaper shows Max and the dragon standing in front of a new library with the creature holding a half-filled basket of books with a "donate" sign on it—but whether the contents are for the library or the dragon is not quite clear. Although the format and colorful watercolor and ink illustrations are rather mundane, they convey the humor of the story, which will hold great appeal for dragon storytimes because of the text's catchy repetitious refrains. Dragon books are currently in vogue, and there aren't many that are easy enough for preschoolers. This one will fit the bill—Judith Constantinides, formerly at East Baton Rouge Parish Main Library, LA
Kirkus Reviews

Little Max attends storytime in the library and then goes to the shelf to find a book. What he finds instead is an egg that shakes itself open and hatches a dragon. When he tries to report it, mom, dad, the head librarian and his teacher all chalk it up to his imagination. Finally, he persuades Officer Riley to investigate the ever-growing dragon, which munches on books with a crunch, crunch refrain. They find the entire town staring in amazement at the large, multicolored dragon. It's no longer a case of a dragon in the library—it's "a library in the dragon!" The dragon's refrain holds a promise for an entertaining tale when first encountered. Alas, it pales in repetition.The text is otherwise pedestrian and lacks imagination, and the illustrations, though colorful, are uninspired and feature stiff, sometimes scary facial expressions. And the poor dragon? He should sue the costume and make-up department. Even a page of tips on caring for books can't save this effort: Don't check it out. (Picture book. 4-7)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781589808447
  • Publisher: Pelican Publishing Company, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/18/2011
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 632,677
  • Age range: 4 - 7 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.70 (w) x 11.10 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Marita Gentry is a professional artist whose artwork is featured in galleries throughout Louisiana. A recipient of numerous awards and commissions and an accomplished teacher, she is involved in several artist-in-residence programs each year. Gentry's other titles with Pelican include Beware, Beware of the Big Bad Bear!, Madame Poulet and Monsieur Roach, The Cajun Cornbread Boy, The Gigantic Sweet Potato, There's a Dragon in the Library, and Dinosaur Mardi Gras.

Dianne de Las Casas is an award-winning author, storyteller, recording artist, and founder of the celebrated November Is Picture Book Month initiative. She hunts and pecks a good story everywhere she goes. Her work has earned rave reviews from School Library Journal, Booklist, and Kirkus. She performs worldwide at schools, conferences, and special events and is the author of many picture books with Pelican, including Mama's Bayou, The House That Witchy Built, and Blue Frog: The Legend of Chocolate. She lives with her family in Harvey, Louisiana.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 13, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Awesome story to subtly teach the importance of books

    Mommy Bookworm's Thoughts: I LOVE this book. I think it is just so cute. It's kind of like The Boy Who Cried Wolf because no one believes Max until the end of the story! The dragon is made of patchwork material & is so cute that I just want to snuggle with it!! I think it's a great story and shares the message about books in such a cute way that kids don't even realize they're learning with it! It's definitely one that ages 4-8 (and even older) can enjoy, but it would be the higher end of the age range that could actually read it on their own.

    Dahlia Bookworm's Thoughts (11 years old): The book is funny because the dragon kept eating books and would not listen to the boy. I like the drawings. I think the author wanted to teach us to take care of library books and not be mean to them. I can easily read the book by myself. I would recommend it to kids my age or younger.

    Daisy Bookworm's Thoughts (7 years old): I like how Max found a dragon egg and the dragon kept eating the books to grow. I also like this book because I like dragons. I think the author wrote it just for fun and also to tell us not to eat books, but to read them. I also like how they made a new library. I think I could read the book with a little bit of help. I would recommend it to other kids too.

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  • Posted January 29, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A fantastic tale full of fun and spirit

    In this wonderful story a young man named Max is looking through the books when he finds a speckled egg amongst the titles. Taking it carefully in his hands, Max begins to shake it, trying desperately to figure out what it is and where it came from. Soon the egg breaks and out comes a young speckled dragon who wants nothing more than to feed his enormous appetite. Max races to Mom and tells her that there's a dragon in the kids' room devouring the books and making a mess. Mom smiles, says 'Shhh,' and tells Max that no such thing exists...but he has a heck of an imagination. When Max goes back to the library, he tries to once again tell the librarian, his father - even a police officer who guards the town - that the dragon is getting larger and larger and may just consume every book that the library has to offer. Watching Max try with all his might to convince the adults that he's telling the truth will remind readers about the wonderful Polar Express, and how hard it was to make adults listen to something they just didn't believe in anymore. This is truly a book that is an ode to fantastic people such as Mrs. Carroll, and all librarians, who devoted their lives to allowing kids to reach for the stars. Quill says: A fantastic tale full of fun and spirit that will soon join the ranks of Harold and the Purple Crayon - a book truly worthy of classic status for generations to come.

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