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There's a God for That: Optimism in the Face of Earthquakes, Tsunamis and Meltdowns
     

There's a God for That: Optimism in the Face of Earthquakes, Tsunamis and Meltdowns

by Joseph Honton
 

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Every journey is an adventure, but when a major earthquake strikes Japan, triggering cataclysmic events, the author's travels are cut short. What starts out as a quest to discover the sacred meanings of the native Shinto religion, becomes something much more profound. When all of the fail-safe mechanisms at Fukushima Daiichi are overrun, and thirty million lives in

Overview

Every journey is an adventure, but when a major earthquake strikes Japan, triggering cataclysmic events, the author's travels are cut short. What starts out as a quest to discover the sacred meanings of the native Shinto religion, becomes something much more profound. When all of the fail-safe mechanisms at Fukushima Daiichi are overrun, and thirty million lives in the greater Tokyo region are in peril, everyone is forced to confront the reality that nuclear energy is not the "clean alternative" they were led to believe. Japan is the only country to have suffered the horror of atomic bombs, and the Japanese commitment to global nuclear disarmament is well known. But somehow, the resolve to see the dismantling of the world's nuclear arsenals didn't extend to the nuclear power industry. In the frightful days immediately after March 11th, 2011, the world awoke to the realization that nuclear power stations might be even more deadly than atomic bombs. The author chronicles the events as they occur, and reveals the uniquely Japanese way of remaining optimistic in the face of multiple catastrophes.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Geographer and lifelong traveler Honton's 2011 journey through Japan's Shimane prefecture was interrupted by the great Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and subsequent meltdown of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Here, he preserves that feeling of sudden disruption, as early, unhurried chapters in which he discusses local delicacies and museums are suddenly replaced by a stark timeline tracking events from the first signs of earthquake activity. Rather than focus entirely on the unfolding disaster at this point, Honton tries to document both the progression of the crisis and his simultaneous travels through Shimane, to jarring effect. The focus swings wildly from hot springs bathing etiquette to antinuclear arguments. In particular, the exploration of optimism mentioned in the subtitle seems to be completely absent. Leaving aside more detailed studies of the earthquake and meltdown, of which there are several, a more thorough and satisfying treatments of the human experience of the disaster can be found in the anthology March Was Made of Yarn: Reflections on the Japanese Earthquake, Tsunami, and Nuclear Meltdown, edited by Elmer Luke and David Karashima. VERDICT What could have been a light, entertaining travelog attempts to cover far too much ground in far too few pages, leading to an overall feeling of glibness and superficiality. Not recommended.—Neil Derksen, Huntington, IN

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780985642310
Publisher:
Frankalmoigne
Publication date:
11/28/2012
Pages:
186
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.43(d)
Age Range:
3 Months

Meet the Author

JOSEPH HONTON is a world traveler who has visited some of Japan’s most remote places. He married in a Shinto Shrine, and has been living a bi-cultural life for three decades.

His intimate understanding of the language, culture, and religion of Japan, provides an authentic voice for this compelling story.

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