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There's a Princess in the Palace
     

There's a Princess in the Palace

by Zoe Alley, R. W. Alley (Illustrator)
 

In this hilarious collection of princess stories with a distinctive spin, there's Cinderella, who was, though you may not know it, Sleeping Beauty's mom; Sleeping Beauty, who didn't fall asleep because of the prick of a needle—it was sheer boredom; Snow White and her diminutive friends—Les, Lou, Sam, Hank, Nat, Myron, and Bethanne; the princess of frog

Overview

In this hilarious collection of princess stories with a distinctive spin, there's Cinderella, who was, though you may not know it, Sleeping Beauty's mom; Sleeping Beauty, who didn't fall asleep because of the prick of a needle—it was sheer boredom; Snow White and her diminutive friends—Les, Lou, Sam, Hank, Nat, Myron, and Bethanne; the princess of frog fame; and the princess of pea fame.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Like their 2008 collection The Wolf at the Door, with which this volume shares its oversize format, the Alleys' panel-art versions of Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Snow White, The Frog Prince, and The Princess and the Pea are part retelling, part parody. Knit together with some creative genealogy, the stories downplay beauty and romance and concentrate on feisty dialogue. Two mice provide running commentary--"Don't you think she might need to brush after being asleep for so long?" one asks about Sleeping Beauty. Earlier, one asks, "Shouldn't the Prince love Cinderella no matter what she's wearing or who she is?" "Of course," replies the other, "but she doesn't know that yet!" R.W. Alley packs plenty of action into diminutive panels, and the figures' comic facial expressions provoke giggles without resorting to grotesquerie. "I recently read in Better Moats and Gardens that a true princess could never be comfy sleeping on top of even such a small lump as this!" says the queen, with a conspiratorial glance at the camera; readers can practically hear her voice. This will enter the rotation of bedtime favorites. Ages 4–8. (Sept.)
From the Publisher

“This will enter the rotation of bedtime favorites.” —Publishers Weekly, STARRED

“Marvelous for anyone with a wry sense of humor, There's a Princess in the Palace deserves a place in every library.” —School Library Journal, STARRED

“Within a graphic-novel format, the tales of Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Snow White, the Frog Prince and the Princess and the Pea develop familial and hilarious interconnections while retaining the stories' traditional structures…Smartly hysterical.” —Kirkus Reviews, STARRED

“As in their previous joint outing (There's a Wolf at the Door), author and illustrator acknowledge this huge undertaking with an oversized book that begs groups of children to gather round, find a number of amusing details in the smartly rendered comic-book panels, and share the puns and jokes.” —The Horn Book

“The Alleys (There's a Wolf at the Door, 2008) cleverly intertwine the tales of Cinderella, the princess and the pea, Snow White, the frog prince, and Sleeping Beauty into a fractured and delightfully bewitched royal family record.” —Booklist

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Using a comic book format, the Alleys interweave the traditional tales of Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Snow White, the Frog Prince, and the Princess and the Pea in the retelling, as in the previous There's a Wolf at the Door. Puns and contemporary wisecracks add to the fun. Dawn, the Sleeping Beauty, turns out to be the irritated, bored daughter of Cinderella and her prince. A handsome prince kisses her awake, but then she sets off to see the world. Frightened in the woods, Dawn becomes Snow White. The Old Woman soon has her eat the fateful apple, but the Handsome Prince arrives to awaken her again. It is their child who has the adventure with the Frog Prince, and their subsequent daughter who sleeps on the pea. The visual story cleverly begins on the front flap of the jacket where, if we pay proper attention, we see a couple of mice hiking in the direction of the story. They appear often, making humorous comments in speech balloons. The comic parodies are set in a variety of scenes in which the brief body of text competes with the illustrations of events and many speech balloons. There are lots of amusing cartoon-y details to enhance the tales, including anachronistic objects like doorbells and alarm clocks to add to the fun. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
Gr 2 Up—The team who dreamed up the hilarious There's a Wolf at the Door (Roaring Brook, 2008) is back with princess fairy tales that are as fluid as they are fractured. This colorful, oversize graphic novel is packed with puns, witticisms, and sarcastic asides. It opens as Cinderella—whose real name turns out to be Ashley—tries on the glass slipper and it fits. "My princess! Marry me!" says handsome Prince Dennis. "My prince! Okay!" says Cinderella. Before you know it, they have a daughter. A certain witch who is not invited to the christening casts a spell and—voila!—Princess Dawn becomes Sleeping Beauty. She is something of a spoiled brat and wakes to the kiss of another handsome prince—one who takes himself far too seriously. But she's not ready to make a commitment, so off she goes into the woods, where she invades the house of seven dwarfs and turns into Snow White. Wouldn't you know it, the same witch who put her whole household to sleep now offers her a poisoned apple. The serious prince once again engages in mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, and this time S.B./S.W.'s ready for marriage. Her daughter falls in love with a frog, and her granddaughter is forced to sleep on a mountain of mattresses concealing a terribly uncomfortable pea. Two mice provide a clever running commentary in all five tales, and the witch who appears throughout gradually undergoes a dramatic change of lifestyle. Marvelous for anyone with a wry sense of humor, There's a Princess in the Palace deserves a place in every library.—Susan Weitz, formerly at Spencer-Van Etten School District, Spencer, NY
Kirkus Reviews

The Alley duo spread the joy of There's a Wolf at the Door (2009) into another oversized and overstuffed (with giggles, that is) volume. Within a graphic-novel format, the tales of Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Snow White, the Frog Prince and the Princess and the Pea develop familial and hilarious interconnections while retaining the stories' traditional structures. The humor is decidedly contemporary: Cinderella's fairy godmother sends her off with, "Have fun! Make good decisions!" and Princess Dawn (Cinderella's daughter, Sleeping Beauty) whines about being bored. A pair of mice who appear in each tale and in many frames kibitz vigorously, commenting, punning and making allusions that are funny even if readers do not entirely understand them. The colors are bright, the line vivacious and the typefaces dance and sing. The Dwarfs in Snow White (Les, Lew, Sam, Hank, Nat, Myron--and Bethanne) each sport a different old-guy hat (or kerchief), the princes are all handsome and supportive and Joan the disgruntled fairy finds a new calling in real estate. Smartly hysterical. (Graphic fairy tales. 7-10)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596434714
Publisher:
Roaring Brook Press
Publication date:
09/14/2010
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
924,637
Product dimensions:
11.20(w) x 14.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
GN490L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

ZOë B. ALLEY is the author of the acclaimed THERE'S A WOLF AT THE DOOR, which Booklist called in a starred review, "A giggly read-aloud as well as a snortingly funny read-alone."

R. W. ALLEY has illustrated over seventy books for children. He is best known for the Paddington Bear series by Michael Bond and BECAUSE YOUR DADDY LOVES YOU by Andrew Clements. The Alleys live in Barrington, RI.

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