There's Something About Mary: Essays on Phenomenal Consciousness and Frank Jackson's Knowledge Argument / Edition 1

There's Something About Mary: Essays on Phenomenal Consciousness and Frank Jackson's Knowledge Argument / Edition 1

by Peter Ludlow
     
 

In Frank Jackson's famous thought experiment, Mary is confined to a black-and-white room and educated through black-and-white books and lectures on a black-and-white television. In this way, she learns everything there is to know about the physical world. If physicalism -- the doctrine that everything is physical
-- is true, then Mary seems to know all there is

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Overview

In Frank Jackson's famous thought experiment, Mary is confined to a black-and-white room and educated through black-and-white books and lectures on a black-and-white television. In this way, she learns everything there is to know about the physical world. If physicalism -- the doctrine that everything is physical
-- is true, then Mary seems to know all there is to know. What happens, then, when she emerges from her black-and-white room and sees the color red for the first time?
Jackson's knowledge argument says that Mary comes to know a new fact about color,
and that, therefore, physicalism is false. The knowledge argument remains one of the most controversial and important arguments in contemporary philosophy.There's
Something About Mary -- the first book devoted solely to the argument -- collects the main essays in which Jackson presents (and later rejects) his argument along with key responses by other philosophers. These responses are organized around a series of questions: Does Mary learn anything new? Does she gain only know-how (the ability hypothesis), or merely get acquainted with something she knew previously
(the acquaintance hypothesis)? Does she learn a genuinely new fact or an old fact in disguise? And finally, does she really know all the physical facts before her release, or is this a "misdescription"? The arguments presented in this comprehensive collection have important implications for the philosophy of mind and the study of consciousness.

The MIT Press

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780262621892
Publisher:
MIT Press
Publication date:
12/01/2004
Series:
Bradford Books Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
480
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Table of Contents

Foreword : looking back on the knowledge argument
Introduction1
1Epiphenomental qualia39
2What Mary didn't know51
3"Epiphenomenal" qualia?59
4Dennett on the knowledge argument69
5What experience teaches77
6Motion blindness and the knowledge argument105
7Knowing what it is like : the ability hypothesis and the knowledge argument143
8Knowing qualia : a reply to Jackson (with postscript : 1997)163
9Acquaintance with qualia179
10Phenomenal knowledge197
11Phenomenal states (revised version)219
12What Mary couldn't know : belief about phenomenal states241
13Phenomenal concepts and the knowledge argument269
14Jackson on physical information and qualia301
15Two conceptions of the physical309
16Inexpressible truths and the allure of the knowledge argument333
17So many ways of saying no to Mary365
18Postscript409
19Postscript on qualia417
20Mind and illusion421

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