These Last Days: A Christian View of History

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Overview

Specifically, it is about "the present evil age" that we live in right now. For many Christians, the expression "these last days" refers to the time right before the second coming of Christ-but according to the apostles, the last days started with the first coming of Christ and continue even today.

How do we biblically understand our time as the final age of world history? What does this mean for our faith?

Reformed Christians have often ...

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Overview

Specifically, it is about "the present evil age" that we live in right now. For many Christians, the expression "these last days" refers to the time right before the second coming of Christ-but according to the apostles, the last days started with the first coming of Christ and continue even today.

How do we biblically understand our time as the final age of world history? What does this mean for our faith?

Reformed Christians have often avoided the field of eschatology-but it was this doctrine of history that thrilled the first disciples. They realized that with the coming of the "last days" they had entered the time of the kingdom, and this understanding will strengthen our faith too.

Here the Philadelphia Conference on Reformed Theology addresses this important topic and presents the following speakers' insights on:

Together some of the most gifted communicators of God's Word explain the Christian's view on life, death, and the hereafter.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781596382510
  • Publisher: P&R Publishing
  • Publication date: 2/28/2011
  • Pages: 193
  • Product dimensions: 5.53 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.54 (d)

Table of Contents

Editors' Preface ix

1 The Christ of History Sinclair Ferguson 1

2 This Present Evil Age D. A. Carson 17

3 The Age of the Spirit Alistair Begg 39

4 The Resurrection Hope Michael S. Horton 53

5 The Eternal Glory J. Ligon Duncan III 71

6 Partakers of the Age to Come D. A. Carson 89

7 The Four Main Millennial Views Cornelis P. Venema 107

8 A Pastoral Guide to Life after Death Richard D. Phillips 125

9 Evangelical Eschatology, American Style Jeffrey K. Jue 149

10 The Radical Implications of Eternity Paul David Tripp 169

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 6, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Read it for a deeper sense of hope and longing for the return of Christ.

    Taking its title from Hebrews 1:2, These Last Days addresses eschatology and its implications with chapters from speakers at the 2010 Philadelphia Conference on Reformed Theology.

    In general, I thought the amillennial view was held in a humble way, acknowledging differences in how the millennium has been perceived among thoughtful Christians throughout history.

    I thought this was particularly true of Cornelis Venema's chapter "The Four Main Millennial Views" in which he says of the view I most strongly lean toward (historic premillennialism) "You will find it among Christians who take the Scriptures seriously and believe the Bible to be God's very words" (page 110). I appreciated the way he divided the four main millennial views into two larger groups, premillennial (historic and dispensational) and postmillennial (postmillennialism proper and amillennialism). This chapter was one of my favorites; I particularly enjoyed reading the history of the different views.

    I think it is also important to note that many of the chapters are not dependent upon a particular millennial view. Most of the book seems to be about truths common to all Christians: such as hope in the resurrection (featured in Michael Horton's chapter).

    As with most books with multiple contributers, some chapters don't live up to the promise of the whole. I thought Richard Phillips's "A Pastoral Guide to Life after Death" and Jeffrey Jue's "Evangelical Eschatology, American Style" were both below average. I have some hesitancies in widely recommending this book because of their attitudes toward premillennialism (Phillips flippantly says "This seems to do away with a system like premillennialism since the final judgment follows immediately upon Christ's return and not a thousand years later" (page 141),
    while Jue has such comments as "Let me say from the outset that Daniel 9 is the only passage in Scripture that dispensationalists can argue from for a future, seven-year tribulation" (page 162)). However, I hope that frustrations with a few chapters can be overlooked when compared to the value of the book as a whole.

    Speaking of the value of the book, I definitely appreciated that this book was more than theoretical. It didn't just discuss eschatology, but it looked at how it impacts our lives. It consistently pointed to hoping in Christ. In particular, I thought the final chapter by Paul David Tripp did a great job of prompting readers to consider the applications to daily life talking about how this theology should impact things like marriage and materialism, and I found it a very encouraging end to the book.

    Although I wouldn't claim this book was revolutionary in how I think about eschatology, I am still happy to have read it. I come away from it with a deeper sense of hope and longing for the return of Christ.

    Thanks to P&R Publishers for making a copy available to me through NetGalley.

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