They Call Me Carpenter: A Tale of the Second Coming

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Overview

Upton Sinclair Jr. (1878-1968), was a prolific American author who wrote over 90 books in many genres and was widely considered to be one of the best investigators advocating socialist views and supporting anarchist causes. He achieved considerable popularity in the first half of the 20th century. He gained particular fame for his 1906 novel The Jungle, which dealt with conditions in the U. S. meat packing industry and caused a public uproar that partly contributed to the passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act and...
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They Call Me Carpenter (Barnes & Noble Digital Library): A Tale of the Second Coming

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Overview

Upton Sinclair Jr. (1878-1968), was a prolific American author who wrote over 90 books in many genres and was widely considered to be one of the best investigators advocating socialist views and supporting anarchist causes. He achieved considerable popularity in the first half of the 20th century. He gained particular fame for his 1906 novel The Jungle, which dealt with conditions in the U. S. meat packing industry and caused a public uproar that partly contributed to the passage of the Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act in 1906. An early success was the Civil War novel Manassas, written in 1903 and published a year later. Originally projected as the opening book of a trilogy, the success of The Jungle caused him to drop his plans. Sinclair created a socialist commune, named Helicon Hall Colony, in 1906 with proceeds from his novel The Jungle.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781177053167
  • Publisher: Nabu Press
  • Publication date: 8/8/2010
  • Pages: 238
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Upton Beall Sinclair Jr. (September 20, 1878 - November 25, 1968), was an American author and one-time candidate for governor of California who wrote close to one hundred books in many genres. He achieved popularity in the first half of the twentieth century, acquiring particular fame for his classic muckraking novel, The Jungle (1906). It exposed conditions in the U.S. meat packing industry, causing a public uproar that contributed in part to the passage a few months later of the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act and the Meat Inspection Act. Time magazine called him "a man with every gift except humor and silence."
He won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 11 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2008

    Upton Sinclair

    This book was assigned for a history class and I found it very useful in understanding more about 1920s society. I found the book to be a quick and easy read, but still chalked full of information. The book can be seen as a dystopian novel in which Jesus wakes up in the 1920s to an unorganized chaotic society. I recommend this book as it offers a different view of what was really happening during what was known as the ¿Progressive Era.¿ Although there was reform going on during the 1920s, there was also a lot of corruption going on and people were very celebrity driven with the rise of Hollywood and Sinclair highlights those issues.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2008

    A Great Read!

    Upton Sinclair writes the books They Call me Carpenter about what it would be like if Jesus came back in the 1920s. He has a big theme of mobs and Jesus¿ strong dislike for them. It is a great read and very interesting. It touches on many big issues from the 1920¿s. These include the concern of mobs as well as the growing media industry. It takes a look at the change in society and peoples new concern for appearance and materials. It is a nice easy read that is also informative about a specific time period. It is a great book.

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  • Posted December 10, 2008

    Good Book

    Upton Sinclair uses Jesus and all his basic moral values others to put in perspective the struggle between the working class and the elite. Sinclair shows how the Progressive Era, was not so progressive but rather oppressive of the working people. This book is another powerful tool of Sinclair's muckracking that shows the many problems cuased by big business and class distinctions. Overall i though the book was good, and did a great job of using a interesting story to make his point.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2008

    They Call Me Carpenter

    They Call Me Carpenter tells the fictional tale of Jesus Christ resurrecting in the 1920's and shows his almost disgust with the way society has rolled itself out over the 2000 years since his death. It is a very interesting story and should be read by any history class to show the class conflicts felt in California during the 1920's. Upton Sinclair shows how despite the religious feelings of many Americans, they almost spite Jesus. I highly recommend this to any history student.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2008

    A Great READ!!!!

    The book overall was interesting. Upton Sinclair brings Jesus back to earth in the 1920's. The book is interesting to read because it shows how Sinclair perceives people would react to Jesus coming to America in the 1920's. It brings a different light to the 1920's that often historians leave out.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2008

    Great Book

    This book is a great book. I had to read for for my HIST 442 class in SDSU and it was the most exciting book I read all semester. Even though the situation and the plot were unrealistic, I like the idea how the another creates the time scenario and the thoughts of the carpenter to be similar in Roman times! I recommend this book....but in reality Jesus wouldn't have ran away...that's one thing I hated about this book....

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  • Posted October 16, 2008

    Jesus Returns

    In "They Call Me Carpenter" Sinclair continues his muckracking with a disheartend view of the class system in 1920's America. Jesus pops out of a stain glass window to find Hollywood fighting mob for mob. Jesus seemingly unaware of all the turmoil going on skillfully asks questions to get to the bottom of the class struggles he see's. Sinclairs use of an "unknowing" jesus allows the reader to work things out on their own, while seeing the greed, lies, and sensationalism that made "mobville" function.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2008

    American Classic

    They Call Me Carpenter is a lost American classic. Upton Sinclair's novel of Jesus return to 1920's Southern California portrays the Roaring Twenties in a fresh light. Sinclair exposes the greed and hypocrisy of modern America.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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