They Call Me Carpenter; A Tale of the Second Coming

They Call Me Carpenter; A Tale of the Second Coming

4.2 12
by Upton Sinclair
     
 

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally…  See more details below

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Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781314542752
Publisher:
HardPress Publishing
Publication date:
06/23/2013
Pages:
242
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.51(d)

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They Call Me Carpenter: A Tale of the Second Coming 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nice work of characterization, with decent plot.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was assigned for a history class and I found it very useful in understanding more about 1920s society. I found the book to be a quick and easy read, but still chalked full of information. The book can be seen as a dystopian novel in which Jesus wakes up in the 1920s to an unorganized chaotic society. I recommend this book as it offers a different view of what was really happening during what was known as the ¿Progressive Era.¿ Although there was reform going on during the 1920s, there was also a lot of corruption going on and people were very celebrity driven with the rise of Hollywood and Sinclair highlights those issues.
Chet_Shores More than 1 year ago
Upton Sinclair uses Jesus and all his basic moral values others to put in perspective the struggle between the working class and the elite. Sinclair shows how the Progressive Era, was not so progressive but rather oppressive of the working people. This book is another powerful tool of Sinclair's muckracking that shows the many problems cuased by big business and class distinctions. Overall i though the book was good, and did a great job of using a interesting story to make his point.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Upton Sinclair writes the books They Call me Carpenter about what it would be like if Jesus came back in the 1920s. He has a big theme of mobs and Jesus¿ strong dislike for them. It is a great read and very interesting. It touches on many big issues from the 1920¿s. These include the concern of mobs as well as the growing media industry. It takes a look at the change in society and peoples new concern for appearance and materials. It is a nice easy read that is also informative about a specific time period. It is a great book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
They Call Me Carpenter tells the fictional tale of Jesus Christ resurrecting in the 1920's and shows his almost disgust with the way society has rolled itself out over the 2000 years since his death. It is a very interesting story and should be read by any history class to show the class conflicts felt in California during the 1920's. Upton Sinclair shows how despite the religious feelings of many Americans, they almost spite Jesus. I highly recommend this to any history student.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book overall was interesting. Upton Sinclair brings Jesus back to earth in the 1920's. The book is interesting to read because it shows how Sinclair perceives people would react to Jesus coming to America in the 1920's. It brings a different light to the 1920's that often historians leave out.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is a great book. I had to read for for my HIST 442 class in SDSU and it was the most exciting book I read all semester. Even though the situation and the plot were unrealistic, I like the idea how the another creates the time scenario and the thoughts of the carpenter to be similar in Roman times! I recommend this book....but in reality Jesus wouldn't have ran away...that's one thing I hated about this book....
AdotC More than 1 year ago
In "They Call Me Carpenter" Sinclair continues his muckracking with a disheartend view of the class system in 1920's America. Jesus pops out of a stain glass window to find Hollywood fighting mob for mob. Jesus seemingly unaware of all the turmoil going on skillfully asks questions to get to the bottom of the class struggles he see's. Sinclairs use of an "unknowing" jesus allows the reader to work things out on their own, while seeing the greed, lies, and sensationalism that made "mobville" function.
Guest More than 1 year ago
They Call Me Carpenter is a lost American classic. Upton Sinclair's novel of Jesus return to 1920's Southern California portrays the Roaring Twenties in a fresh light. Sinclair exposes the greed and hypocrisy of modern America.