They Called Them Greasers / Edition 1

They Called Them Greasers / Edition 1

4.0 3
by Arnoldo De Leon
     
 

ISBN-10: 0292780540

ISBN-13: 9780292780545

Pub. Date: 01/01/1983

Publisher: University of Texas Press

Tension between Anglos and Tejanos has existed in the Lone Star State since the earliest settlements. Such antagonism has produced friction between the two peoples, and whites have expressed their hostility toward Mexican Americans unabashedly and at times violently.

This seminal work in the historical literature of race relations in Texas examines the attitudes

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Overview

Tension between Anglos and Tejanos has existed in the Lone Star State since the earliest settlements. Such antagonism has produced friction between the two peoples, and whites have expressed their hostility toward Mexican Americans unabashedly and at times violently.

This seminal work in the historical literature of race relations in Texas examines the attitudes of whites toward Mexicans in nineteenth-century Texas. For some, it will be disturbing reading. But its unpleasant revelations are based on extensive and thoughtful research into Texas' past. The result is important reading not merely for historians but for all who are concerned with the history of ethnic relations in our state.

They Called Them Greasers argues forcefully that many who have written about Texas's past—including such luminaries as Walter Prescott Webb, Eugene C. Barker, and Rupert N. Richardson—have exhibited, in fact and interpretation, both deficiencies of research and detectable bias when their work has dealt with Anglo-Mexican relations. De León asserts that these historians overlooled an austere Anglo moral code which saw the morality of Tejanos as "defective" and that they described without censure a society that permitted traditional violence to continue because that violence allowed Anglos to keep ethnic minorities "in their place."

De León's approach is psychohistorical. Many Anglos in nineteenth-century Texas saw Tejanos as lazy, lewd, un-American, subhuman. In De León's view, these attitudes were the product of a conviction that dark-skinned people were racially and culturally inferior, of a desire to see in others qualities that Anglos preferred not to see in themselves, and of a need to associate Mexicans with disorder so as to justify their continued subjugation.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780292780545
Publisher:
University of Texas Press
Publication date:
01/01/1983
Pages:
168
Sales rank:
750,518
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.39(d)

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • A Note on Terminology
  • 1. Initial Contacts: Redeeming Texas from Mexicans, 1821-1836
  • 2. Niggers, Redskins, and Greasers: Tejano Mixed-Bloods in a White Racial State
  • 3. An Indolent People
  • 4. Defective Morality
  • 5. Disloyalty and Subversion
  • 6. Leyendas Negras
  • 7. Frontier "Democracy" and Tejanos—the Antebellum Period
  • 8. Frontier "Democracy" and Tejanos—the Postbellum Period
  • 9. Epilogue: "Not the White Man's Equal
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Index

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They Called Them Greasers 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
De Leon's book was definately an eye-opening experience for me. I am a native Texan and have been raised to believe that the founders of our state were honest and good hearted men and women. DeLeon brings to the forefront the truth of a few of Texas' most influential leaders of the time. He mentions events and issues that no Texas school children will ever hear unless they read this book...a must read for any Texas educated individual. It will make you re-think Texas History 101.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have read 3 of DeLeon's books, and this one by far is the most intense. DeLeon writes about the plight of Mexican-Americans living in Texas, and how and why racial prejudice manifested amongst the Anglos. It is a very descriptive and well documented work, but he fails to mention how the upper-class Tejanos avoided the brunt of the racial prejudice.