They Had Goat Heads

( 3 )

Overview

D. Harlan Wilson returns with another ferociously mindbending collection of short fiction. Masked in absurdity, these stories reveal the horrifying and hilarious faces of everyday life. Wilson tells of egg raids, hog rippers, monk spitters, fathers who take their children to pet stores to buy them whales, sociopaths who threaten to clothesline eternity, and the simple act of the story itself becoming a means of repetitive, endless torture. Put on your goat head, hop in your hovercraft, and take a ride with a ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (6) from $13.19   
  • New (3) from $13.19   
  • Used (3) from $24.74   
They Had Goat Heads

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$2.99
BN.com price

Overview

D. Harlan Wilson returns with another ferociously mindbending collection of short fiction. Masked in absurdity, these stories reveal the horrifying and hilarious faces of everyday life. Wilson tells of egg raids, hog rippers, monk spitters, fathers who take their children to pet stores to buy them whales, sociopaths who threaten to clothesline eternity, and the simple act of the story itself becoming a means of repetitive, endless torture. Put on your goat head, hop in your hovercraft, and take a ride with a juggernaut of modern imaginative fiction.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780982628126
  • Publisher: Atlatl Press
  • Publication date: 9/27/2010
  • Pages: 146
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.34 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 26, 2010

    A surreal mind stretch

    Some anthologies are soothing tales, quaint, charming and help you pass the time waiting in an airport, or to assist your head to drift off to the land of nod at bedtime. This book is NOTHING LIKE THAT! Each story is a unique coruscating mind adventure. It's not possible to take it all in and be embroiled in each intrigue in one go. While bizarro stories seem to be meaningless and an injection of lateral-thinking hilarity, there's more to them than that. When you hammer a banana, and a bee buzzes a window cleaner outside the plane on a clockwork bowl of custard... well, your head is either messed up, or it begins to think in a different way, loosening the cobwebs in there.

    Listen to the beginning of 'Beneath a Pink Sun':
    "Conflict is an illusion without which apes and begonias would shrivel in the wind. The grill, however, is covered with steaks. Tenderloins. They sizzle in the back yard beneath a pink sun. Somebody turns on a bugzapper. Music of tiny deaths..."

    Laugh at a line in Chimpanzee where 'I' is in a bad situation, calls 911 and finds the operator "sounds attractive". Unfortunately, 'I' is badly mistreated by the arriving police - beaten, pistol-whipped, kicked and thrown into a cell. All outrageous and illegal. He's allowed the proverbial single phone call, so calls 911. Brilliant.

    In many ways the tales have a message, however deeply buried then working upwards into your subconscious. They're apparent nonsense maybe not so - in the ilk of the sufi homilies of Idries Shah, for example in his The Pleasantries of the Incredible Mulla Nasrudin. In particular the stories: Cape Crusade, Turns, and The Womb. I'm not saying they are the same style exactly - both Shah and D. Harlan Wilson are unique, but that if you enjoy one you are likely to relish the other. Another writer's work triggered by the style of these stories are the alternate reality ones by Ira Nayman - eg in his Alternate Reality Ain't What It Used To Be.

    The funniest gory story I've ever read is in this book - The Arrest. I tease you with a few lines from the beginning:
    A man said, "You are under arrest."
    Another man said, "No, you are under arrest."
    "No," said the first man. "It's the other way around. You are the one who is under arrest."
    "I'm not under arrest," said the second man. "You are."
    "I'm going to arrest you now," said the first man, taking the second man by the elbow.
    "No. Now I will arrest you"
    ... and so it goes on hilariously involving more men, more arrests, fights, fatalities. Several of the stories have this kind of self-referential effect, and I've always been drawn to literary recursion.
    Lines I wish I'd written include 'The clouds fell into the horizon' - in the story, Monk Splitter. 'Time is the splash of a raindrop on a cornflake.'
    For readers of graphic stories, there is one, The Sister, illustrated horrifically by Skye Thorstenson. It's a dark story summed up by the opening line: 'And the moment I finished sewing up my little sister...' It is hellically [sic] recursive.
    Some of the stories leave me cold, but there are a total of 39 stories, most of which are semi-precious with a sprinkling of gems.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 22, 2012

    weird

    I usually love weird stuff, but I have to say that I was a little more than lost with this one. It was a bit too fractured for me. BUT, I respect the effort it took to write.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2012

    What?

    Not sure if this person tried to hard or is mental...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)