Things As They Are

Things As They Are

5.0 2
by Sebastião Salgado
     
 
Things as They Are presents the story of photojournalism over the past five decades, from 1955 until today. Published in collaboration with World Press Photo on the occasion of its fiftieth anniversary, the book takes us from the golden era of the illustrated press--the heyday of Life magazine and Picture Post, and the moment of The Museum of

Overview

Things as They Are presents the story of photojournalism over the past five decades, from 1955 until today. Published in collaboration with World Press Photo on the occasion of its fiftieth anniversary, the book takes us from the golden era of the illustrated press--the heyday of Life magazine and Picture Post, and the moment of The Museum of Modern Art's defining Family of Man exhibition--to the twenty-first century's explosion of digital media. This history is told through the presentation of 125 photojournalistic features shot and published around the world, shown in context on the pages of newspapers and magazines as the public originally experienced them. In this way, Things as They Are reveals how the events of the world, the art of photographers and the interests of publishers and the press converged on the printed page. It traces how photojournalism has developed over time alongside changing technology, media, fashions in photography, and a changing world. And it does so using landmark photo-essays from some of the greatest photographers in the world, including W. Eugene Smith, Sebastiao Salgado, Mary Ellen Mark, James Nachtwey, Annie Liebovitz, Nan Goldin and Henri Cartier-Bresson. Each project is accompanied by expert commentary. An international panel of 100 specialists--photographers, editors, art directors, historians and magazine collectors--made the final selections. They chose stories that exemplified the highest quality of work published internationally during each period, stories that demonstrated important innovations in photography and in publishing, and stories that played a key role in shaping the history of photojournalism itself.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
When the World Press Photo organization wanted to issue a commemorative volume that would dynamically trace developments in the last half-century of photojournalism, they had a very good idea: instead of presenting just a selection of memorable images, they would also reproduce the context-the actual pages of newspapers and magazines-in which the images first appeared. The result is a resounding technical success; the volume is big enough to clearly reproduce a variety of formats while remaining comfortable to look through. The book is also exceptionally well edited, with spare but helpful texts, an intelligent mix of the familiar (Salgado's 1987 series of Brazilian miners for the London Sunday Times) and fairly obscure (Donna Ferrato's powerful Philadelphia Inquirer series on domestic violence from the same year). Serious topics rub shoulders with comparatively lighthearted but era-defining sequences, like Helmut Newton's 1979 shoot in Berlin for the German edition of Vogue and Martin Parr's "Sun Kitsch" spread for W in 1997. The original layouts are highly evocative in themselves, and the reduced format intensifies their graphic power. This book is compulsive reading for anyone interested in how photographers have witnessed history and how their images have entered it. (Mar.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781597110143
Publisher:
Aperture Foundation
Publication date:
03/01/2006
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
9.28(w) x 11.92(h) x 1.32(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Mary Ellen Markis images of our world is diverse cultures have become landmarks in the field of documentary photography. She has published 14 books and her photographs have been exhibited worldwide. She is the recipient of many awards, including the Cornell Capa Award, the Infinity Award for Journalism, an Erna & Victor Hasselblad Foundation Grant, a Walter Annenberg Grant, a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, the Matrix Award, three fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, and two Robert F. Kennedy Awards.

Christian Caujolle is director of the Paris-based photo agency and gallery, Vu, which he created in 1986.

Mary Panser is a curator and cultural historian. She has taught at the Rhode Island School of Design, University of Kansas, and New York University, and was curator of photographs at the National Portrait Gallery (Smithsonian Institution) in Washington, D.C., from 1992 to 2000.

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Things As They Are 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mary Panzer and Christian Coujolle provide the essays to compliment Things Are They Are: Photojournalism In Context Since 1955, a survey of photojournalism which divides presentations by 10-year eras and provides a strong documentary history through over a hundred features shot and published around the world. Each story appears in context of its newspaper or magazine appearance, as seen by its first readers: having them all under one cover provides a unique world presentation and focus unavailable elsewhere and allows for juxtaposition of landmark presentations which set the standard for photographic and journalistic excellence.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'When the World Press Photo organization wanted to issue a commemorative volume that would dynamically trace developments in the last half-century of photojournalism, they had a very good idea: instead of presenting just a selection of memorable images, they would also reproduce the context¿the actual pages of newspapers and magazines¿in which the images first appeared. The result is a resounding technical success the volume is big enough to clearly reproduce a variety of formats while remaining comfortable to look through. The book is also exceptionally well edited, with spare but helpful texts, an intelligent mix of the familiar (Salgado's 1987 series of Brazilian miners for the London Sunday Times) and fairly obscure (Donna Ferrato's powerful Philadelphia Inquirer series on domestic violence from the same year). Serious topics rub shoulders with comparatively lighthearted but era-defining sequences, like Helmut Newton's 1979 shoot in Berlin for the German edition of Vogue and Martin Parr's 'Sun Kitsch' spread for W in 1997. The original layouts are highly evocative in themselves, and the reduced format intensifies their graphic power. This book is compulsive reading for anyone interested in how photographers have witnessed history and how their images have entered it. (Mar.).'