Things I Can't Forget (Hundred Oaks Series #3) by Miranda Kenneally, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Things I Can't Forget (Hundred Oaks Series #3)

Things I Can't Forget (Hundred Oaks Series #3)

4.5 81
by Miranda Kenneally
     
 

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"A must read...I couldn't put it down." —Simone Elkeles on Catching Jordan

From the bestselling author of Catching Jordan comes a new teen romance sure to appeal to fans of Sarah Dessen.

SOME RULES WERE MEANT TO BE BROKEN.

Kate has always been the good girl. Too good, according to some people at school—although

Overview

"A must read...I couldn't put it down." —Simone Elkeles on Catching Jordan

From the bestselling author of Catching Jordan comes a new teen romance sure to appeal to fans of Sarah Dessen.

SOME RULES WERE MEANT TO BE BROKEN.

Kate has always been the good girl. Too good, according to some people at school—although they have no idea the guilty secret she carries. But this summer, everything is different...

This summer she's a counselor at Cumberland Creek summer camp, and she wants to put the past behind her. This summer Matt is back as a counselor too. He's the first guy she ever kissed, and he's gone from geeky songwriter who loved The Hardy Boys to a buff lifeguard who loves to flirt...with her.

Kate used to think the world was black and white, right and wrong. Turns out, life isn't that easy...

Praise for Miranda Keaneally:

"Fresh, fearless, and totally romantic."—Sarah Ockler, bestselling author of the Twenty Boy Summer

"Catching Jordan is the romantic comedy I've been waiting for. I loved it!"—Jennifer Echols, author of Such a Rush

"An incredibly well-written, beautiful story that balances romance, drama, and comedy perfectly."—Bookish, on Stealing Parker

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Eighteen-year-old narrator Kate Kelly begins the summer after high school in a state of prolonged moral distress. Although firmly believing premarital sex and abortion to be sins, Kate nevertheless provides financial and practical help when her best friend chooses to end a pregnancy. Guilt plagues Kate, undermining the girls' friendship, and clouding her experience as a summer camp counselor, as she observes her peers' behavior through a lens of judgment and disapproval. A budding romantic interest awakens Kate's awareness of the power of sexual urges, while an unexpected friendship with a fellow churchgoer, whom she had shunned in a time of need, causes Kate to question the moral guidance of her church and examine the "Christian" nature of her own actions. Throughout the novel, Kenneally (Catching Jordan) uses a light touch, addressing teenage pregnancy, sexuality, and alcohol use without being pedantic. Wisdom from Kate's father, "Your truth isn't everybody else's truth," provides unanticipated guidance in this compassionate and nuanced exploration of friendship, love, and maturing religious understanding. Ages 13–up. Agent: Sara Megibow, Nelson Literary Agency. (Mar.)
From the Publisher
"Miranda Kenneally's best book yet. " - Shelf Awareness for Readers

"Like Diane Court in Say Anything, when sheltered, high-achieving junior Kate dives into a social life for the first time, she experiences the conflict and messiness of life at the same time she experiences her first love." - Justine magazine

"Talented Kenneally is unafraid to tackle challenging topics. Her heroine this go-round is a devout Christian struggling with her faith. Kate is an interesting blend of sweet, confused and judgmental, which doesn't always make her likable. However, she's incredibly realistic. A worthy read with a dreamy male lead." - RT Book Reviews

"An up-and-coming young-adult novelist." - The Washington Post

"Kate's sheltered worldview is well-drawn, and the hesitant first steps on her spiritual journey are handled sensitively . . . Kate's growth will keep readers, Christian or otherwise, reading." - Kirkus

"Kenneally's spare, straightforward prose, combined with a heavy dose of romance, makes it an accessible novel that should appeal even to reluctant readers. . .Teenagers will find this coming-of-age story both entertaining and poignant." - School Library Journal

"Throughout the novel, Kenneally uses a light touch, addressing teenage pregnancy, sexuality, and alcohol use without being pedantic. Wisdom from Kate's father, "Your truth isn't everybody else's truth," provides unanticipated guidance in this compassionate and nuanced exploration of friendship, love, and maturing religious understanding." - Publishers Weekly

"Simply put, if you love contemporary YA romance that has a mix serious issues, drama and steamy scenes then you are going to devour Things I Can't Forget. It is a great addition to the Hundred Oaks series." - Michelle and Leslie's Book Picks

"Kenneally's books have quickly become must—reads," - VOYA

VOYA - Jennifer Rummel
Kate is questioning her life and the role of God in it. Ever since she helped her best friend, Emily, get an abortion, she is not sure what to believe. She feels so guilty and so disconnected from the world. She and Emily were supposed to be camp counselors together, but now she is going alone. Kate is responsible for the arts and crafts tent. She is surprised to find she knows some of the other counselors—Parker, Will, and Jordan from her school, and Matt from her own camping days. Matt has changed, and Kate finds herself drawn to him. She never expected her attraction to make her feel so reckless and happy. Kate is a complex character. On one hand, she believes that her actions are wrong, yet has a hard time stopping herself from those actions. Her inner struggle is fascinating as she starts questioning the world around her more and more. She realizes that life is layered, and what she previously thought was a black-and-white situation might not be the case at all. Kate also struggles through the meaning of friendship by analyzing the strengths and weaknesses of her own actions. These moments blend perfectly with the summer at camp, her new friendships, and the romance with Matt. Kenneally's books have quickly become must—reads. Reviewer: Jennifer Rummel
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up—Though devoutly religious, Kate recently compromised her deeply held beliefs to help her best friend, Emily, obtain an abortion-a decision that has strained the girls' friendship and sent Kate reeling. When the teen becomes a camp counselor the summer before starting college, she questions her identity even further. Romance blossoms between Kate and a fellow counselor, Matt, and she befriends Parker, a girl whom Kate used to look down upon for her wild and promiscuous lifestyle. Subsequently, she begins to reevaluate her judgmental attitudes. Though it's primarily her relationships with others that result in Kate's growth from an uptight, narrow-minded wallflower to a self-assured young woman, characterization is sketchy, and characters are largely one-note (the gorgeous, confident love interest; her lost and confused best friend; her strict, unsympathetic boss). Still, Kenneally's spare, straightforward prose, combined with a heavy dose of romance, makes it an accessible novel that should appeal even to reluctant readers. Kate's habit of questions to herself as she encounters conflicts ("But what if I would rather have a relationship with God than friendships with people who don't believe in him like I do?") imbues her with an uncertainty that will resonate with teens. Adolescents will also relate to her simultaneous feelings of longing and guilt as she copes with her burgeoning sexuality. Despite the flaws, teenagers will find this coming-of-age story both entertaining and poignant.—Mahnaz Dar, Library Journal
Kirkus Reviews
A struggle for self-identity forms the core of this crowded novel, the latest entry in Kenneally's Hundred Oaks series. Kate is spending her summer working as a counselor at a church-run camp. She's still reeling from her decision to help her best friend Emily get an abortion and hopes that in the mountains of Tennessee, she will get a sign that God forgives her. With a camp director who singles her out unfairly, counselors who don't act very Christian in Kate's judgmental opinion and the end of her friendship with Emily, there's only one thing that's going right: Kate's blossoming relationship with Matt, the boy who gave Kate her first kiss years ago at camp. Matt is charming, sweet and clearly crazy about her. But the way Matt makes Kate feel contradicts everything she's learned in church. If Kate wants to have friends and love, she'll have to decide what she believes. Kate's sheltered worldview is well-drawn, and the hesitant first steps on her spiritual journey are handled sensitively. There are more characters than necessary, especially with characters from Kenneally's other books making appearances, as well as too many issues, such as abortion, parental abuse and gay relationships, giving the story a kitchen-sink feel. That said, Kate's growth will keep readers, Christian or otherwise, reading. (Fiction. 14 & up)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781402271908
Publisher:
Sourcebooks
Publication date:
03/05/2013
Series:
Hundred Oaks Series, #3
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
98,145
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.90(d)
Lexile:
HL680L (what's this?)
Age Range:
13 - 17 Years

Read an Excerpt

sketch #323
what happened on april 6

Girls like me do not buy pregnancy tests.

I drag my pencil down the paper, drawing tears rolling from her eyes.

Girls like me sing in the church choir. Every spring break, I go on mission trips to Honduras, where we renovate houses for the underprivileged. I do all my homework every night, and before I go to bed, I kiss Daddy's cheek and tell him I wish he'd go to the doctor about his blood pressure and start getting more exercise than walking Fritz and scooping his poop.

I've only kissed one boy my entire life.

Emily called that day, crying. "Kate," she said between sobs. "You can't tell anyone. Not even your mom."

I drove to Walmart two towns away, over in Green Hills, so no one would see me buying the test. I trembled as I carried the box to the self-checkout lane. I scanned, bagged, and paid, and bit back tears, because my best friend of fifteen years-since we were three years old-might have accidentally gotten pregnant by her long-time boyfriend.

I didn't even know they had had sex. It's not something they would tell. If anyone found out that Jacob, son of Brother Michael-our preacher at church-got a girl pregnant out of wedlock? Chaos.

It wouldn't look good for Emily either. She's like me. Always wears clean T-shirts and none of her jeans have holes or loose strings. She would never even think about smoking a cigarette. She doesn't go over the speed limit. She plays the violin and has a scholarship lined up to attend Belmont University in Nashville.

But Emily made a mistake.

I use my black coloring pencil to shade her hair. My red pencil fills in her lips, turned upside down in a frown.

And then I made an even bigger mistake: I helped her.

Meet the Author

Growing up in Tennessee, MIRANDA KENNEALLY dreamed of becoming an Atlanta Brave, a country singer (cliché!), or a UN interpreter. Instead she writes and works for the State Department in Washington, D.C., where George W. Bush once used her shoulder as an armrest. Miranda loves Twitter, Star Trek and her husband. Visit mirandakenneally.com

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Things I Can't Forget 4.5 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 80 reviews.
Cupcakegirly More than 1 year ago
LOVED.IT.SO.HARD! I have enjoyed all of Miranda Kenneally's books thus far but this one, THIS ONE, with THIS BOOK BOY sent me spiraling into the land of "I LOVE THIS AUTHOR AND I WILL READ ANYTHING SHE WRITES!" What I loved: Matt Brown. OK, I'll come back to him in a minute. Miranda Kenneally is a master at covering the hot button issues with grace, honesty and compassion. She has the ability to make the reader see both sides of a situation and creates characters and stories that are realistic and completely relateable. Regardless of whether or not you agree with the choices being made, you're still able to empathize with what these characters are going through. Life isn't black and white and a person's faith and beliefs are just that, personal, but there comes a point in life when you have to decide what you believe and why. You have to own it. Or not. Kate struggles with a lifetime of expectations and it isn't until she finds herself reeling with guilt over helping her friend that she truly begins to understand this. While spending the summer at church camp, Kate comes face to face with people and situations that go against everything she's ever been taught is "right". She finds herself challenged in ways she never imagined and she'll have to decide for herself what's most important, rules or relationships which is easier said than done especially when she runs into Matt again. Fans of Miranda Kenneally's know that she writes AMAZEBALL BOOK BOYS! I mean, I loved Sam Henry in Catching Jordan and Will Whitfield in Stealing Parker but Matt Brown is truly one of the Things I Can't Forget! Matt is the kind of boy you want your daughter to bring home and your son to be. He's smart, funny, artistic, and definitely not riding the ugly train especially with those biceps. *fans face* Matt is also grounded in his beliefs and he helps Kate see that nobody is perfect, he teaches her how to forgive and how to see good in others. Matt also shows Kate how to love. *swoons* These two could be open and honest with each other about every aspect of their relationship which is not always easy to do and I thoroughly enjoyed watching it grow. What left me wanting: Not.enough.Matt.Brown. In fact, I could read an ENTIRE book dedicated to Matt and his love for music, literature, green beans and of course, his biceps. *hint hint Miranda* ;) Final verdict: Things I Can't Forget is a beautifully written story about faith, love and becoming the person you were meant to be. READ.IT!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Keep writing the series of the books! I want to read about there college experience!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read "Catching Jordan", "Stealing Parker" and I just finished "Things I Can't Forget". After I read stealing parker I was counting down the days until this book came out. Now I will star counting down the days until the next book comes out. (:
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this authir she is by far my faavorite, this book amazing i loved it, I highly recomend this book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book!!! Even though it didnt relate to sports likee the two previous ones did it had other perks that made it great!!! I really loved the characters although kate sometimes annoyed me i rlly liked matt!! I love miranda keneallys writing and hope she writes for years to come!!! Cant wait for racing savanah in december!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Romantic!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! People it was good -14 yr old oakly( im a girl)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of the best books i have ever read! It is a very good read and keeps you very intrigued!
Andreat78 More than 1 year ago
At this point I have read a ton of reviews for Things I Can't Forget. Almost all have given Miranda Kenneally high praised (very well-deserved) for her writing and the story. Almost all have also mentioned having a hard time connecting with Kate. I am absolutely not trying to argue or discount those feelings, each person comes to a book bringing their unique outlook on life and relationships. What I want to do is offer an alternative point-of-view in regards to Kate. Kate Kelly is maybe the best example I have personally read for a character who is driven, and often conflicted, by their faith. I know this might make her appear to be judgmental and pushy, and I'm not going to argue with that. The thing is, if you've been raised in a very strict church that takes the Bible and it's rules very literally, this is often who you become. I know this because almost all my friends were like Kate, and I even caught myself doing it when I was really young. We were raised going to a very, very strict church, probably even stricter than Kate's because it didn't even allow music in church or dancing. Kate was raised with a specific set of standards to live by, God's standards, and she takes that seriously. I had a friend (of an even stricter religion) tell me I was going to Hell for cutting my bangs. My best friend told me my Uncle would go to Hell for getting a divorce. Though my feelings were hurt, I didn't exactly get mad at them, because I knew that's what they were taught. A lot of that went by the wayside, though, when we became teenagers. We went to parties, we kissed a lot of boys. We still knew these things we "wrong", we just traded our piousness for a buttload of guilt. See, Kate feels guilty; for things she's done, things she's said, every errant thought or feeling. Guilt. Guilt. Guilt. And it will drive you crazy, trust me. My point is: Yes, with her judmental thoughts, worries, and guilt, Kate may be hard to connect with, but that just means that Kenneally nailed the portrayal of a girl conflicted by the world around her. Kate sees the world in black or white, wrong or right. Things I Can't Forget is Kate's journey of learning that the world is not concrete, there are many shades of grey to what she thought was absolutes. And if you don't see that when you're reading this, you're going to miss a really powerful story. Okay, I'm climbing down off my soapbox now... So how about that story?! I personally love books set at summer camps, maybe because I never got to go. I enjoyed the different personlities of the counselors, and how they interacted with one another. Of course, my favorite counselor was Matt, a super cute, super sweet guy Kate knew from her own camp experience. I loved that Matt had this open, affectionate way with Kate, but still maintained a bit of a mysterious edge. To see Matt, with his relaxed nature, help bring Kate out of her shell was so endearing. I loved being able to experience them falling in love. AND, it was so so so great to have Parker and Will at camp, and to get to see a bit of Sam and Jordan! Ultimately, for me, Things I Can't Forget was Kate's journey of forgiveness and acceptance. She needs to forgive herself. She needs to accept that others won't always see the world the same, or feel the way she does. And she needs to accept herself. Things I Can't Forget was a beatifully written, very thoughtful story. It's my favorite Miranda Kenneally book yet.
Ellenalwaysyaatheart0 More than 1 year ago
In this third installment of The Hundred Oaks Series we get to know Kate, who has just graduated from high school and is preparing to work for the summer at Cumberland Creek camp.  Originally, her best friend Emily had planned to work with her, but unforeseen circumstances have prevented that from happening and have left Kate distraught, emotionally torn, and angry, not only with her friend, but with herself because of the part she played in it.  Kate has grown up in the same church as Parker, who you will remember from Stealing Parker.  She and Will are also working at Cumberland Creek camp.  Kate meets Matt also, who she quickly falls for, and she isn't the only one.  They went to this same camp when they were kids and have a "history" together.  The more time she spends around Matt, Parker, and the others at camp, she comes to realize that her religious beliefs have made her come off as a prude, and she has been judgmental, even if she didn't realize it.  This is quite a process for her, because she didn't realize how deep rooted this was in her.  With the help of Matt, Parker, and her other new friends, she begins to realize that just because people don't believe the same way you do, doesn't make them wrong, and that every person is entitled to their own beliefs whether you agree with them or not.  She still has a way to go, but she makes tremendous progress in this area, some really great friends, finds love, and battles with some really tough issues in the process.   I enjoyed Things I Can't Forget.  It was great getting to see Parker and Will again, as well as getting a glimpse of what is going on in Jordan's life.  The story deals a lot with Kate's relationship with God, what she believes, what is wrong with some of her beliefs, and her personal journey with coming to terms with everything in the process.  I liked her and didn't like her, felt bad for her, and then was happy to see the direction her life was taking.  Matt was an absolute doll.  He was quite the hottie, had a great personality, and was just an all around great guy.  He has been through a lot himself, yet was patient and kind with Kate, and respected her in the process, especially when their physical relationship got "steamy."  I also enjoyed the fact that there really wasn't a love triangle going on, even though Matt had other girls that liked him, and how he and Kate were finally able to be so open with each other.  He really helps her to deal with her big issue with Emily and come to terms with it.  I also enjoyed getting to know the other characters in the book as well.  Miranda Kenneally has done an excellent job addressing some really tough issues in Things I Can't Forget, and though the book deals a great deal with God and Kate's religious beliefs, it doesn't come across as "preachy."  Overall, I enjoyed this third installment in The Hundred Oaks Series and looking forward to reading Racing Savannah, which comes out later this year. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
what happened after this i could nnot put down the book i hope you make another this wwas the best book ive read in awhile
Jaska97 More than 1 year ago
I enjoy this author and her books, I like how each one has a different focus but still include past characters from other books. I'm still holding out for another Jordan/Sam centered book though! :)
LillyBookReads More than 1 year ago
Love Miranda Kenneally's books!  I've waiting to read this book. Omq. Since forever. Because Catching Jordan was good man. i really love that book. Catching Jordan was so good, I reread  it twice. Omg. And I hate rereading books, because I'm already going to know what's going to happen. But I guess not with Catching Jordan. ;D  The Cover:  It's cute. The bike thing while holding hands. This is random but my brother rode on a  horse while holding hands with his wife for an engagement picture. This cover is kind of like that, but a younger version for teens.  The Character:  I really love how Miranda Kenneally's characters from the last two books appear in this book. We get to see more of the Jordan-Sam relationship and Parker-Will relationship, which I totally crave and ship. The third book introduces a new couple, Kate and Matt.  Matt - Matt went to Cumberland Camp before when he was younger. Back then, he was quiet, shy, geeky. People teased him, bullied him, etc. He almost went suicidal. Until, he met Kate. Kate, who changed how he viewed himself and who kept him alive. Now, he's confident. He's funny, popular, hot. he had a girlfriend named Sarah. They had a three year relationship but they broke up. And Matt was so not expecting to fall in love. Again. With the girl he fell in love with so long ago.  Okay, so Matt. Yep. The love story you would imagine. You meet him at camp. You fall in love. You date. Happily ever after. But Kate just couldn't do that. Kate - Kate is really religious. I have nothing against religious people, but she is so religious that I just want to kill her sometimes. And annoying. Like ohmyfreakingawd, what's wrong with you? Apparently, talking to a guy alone is sinning. And I'm like omfg girl, man up. And of course, kissing, making out is way out of hand. I get the no sex thing, but like no holding hands or talking? No wonder you don't have friends.  What I like though, is that in a way, characters all connect to each other. Like despite Kate being way down low in the popularity chart, she was still able to go to one of Jordan's popular parties. ;D Parker - Parker was already introduced in Stealing Parker. As of she's the main character. Either way, she kind of played a role in this book. She encouraged Kate and Matt's relationship and Parker and Kate actually ended up becoming friend which is good. There are a lot of relationships in this book, but it's cute and all. The Extras: If you haven't gotten the connection yet, Kate goes to Hundred Oaks High School. She knows about Jordan and stuff because Jordan is popular. And I guess Parker is also kind of popular. Agh. Anyways, love Jordan! ;D   Rating: (1-10): 8.5
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
But I was sort of bored with this one. I thought it could use more story
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've read this book about 10 times and I'm in love with it
kimberlyfaye More than 1 year ago
It's been awhile since I read a Miranda Kenneally book. The first book in her Hundred Oaks series, Catching Jordan, is one of my favorites YA contemporaries. I read the second book, Stealing Parker, and it really wasn't for me. I never made a conscious decision to not read further on in this series, but over time I moved on and never went back to read the next books. After getting approved for her upcoming book, Jesse's Girl, I decided it's high time to play catch up. I'm glad I did, too, because Things I Can't Forget was a great read and exactly what I needed when I read it.  I'll admit, I was a little concerned going into this book that it would have too much religion for my own personal preference. I was wrong. I mean, there is quite a bit of religion – the book is set during a church summer camp and the main character is wrestling with her own faith and beliefs. I actually loved the part religion played in this book and the way it was handled. I think it has a great message about your faith being your own and how important it is to not thrust your beliefs and values upon others.  Kate was a good heroine. I struggled with her a bit at times because of how judgmental she tended to be of others. I recognize she was struggling and trying to reconcile her beliefs with some of her new desires and things she had done, but I find that kind of behavior off-putting. The good news here is that Kate begins to see the error of her ways. I think she matured quite nicely with the help of her experiences at summer camp and the friends she made there.  Of course, I can't say enough about how important one of her fellow campers, Matt, is to her growth during this story. Matt is adorable. He really is one of the highlights of this book for me. I loved his personality. He was quirky and fun. I adored the backstory between he and Kate. It was just cute. I thoroughly enjoyed watching these two get to know each other again. It was a sweet, first love-ish kind of romance that just made me smile. It also gave Kate some moments of pause as she tried to figure out where these new feelings fit into her faith and how to move forward.  I don't read nearly as many YA books as I used to for a number of reasons, but I won't get into those here. What I will say is that this book was the perfect palate cleanser after too many new adult books in a row. It made me remember why I enjoy reading YA. I think Miranda does an amazing job accurately portraying the life of a teenager. It was realistic, which doesn't always mean pretty. But the struggles Kate went through are the same so many teens do. I'm not a super religious person, but I really did appreciated the part faith played in Things I Can't Forget. It even gave me some things to think about.  I can tell you that, as I write this review, I have just finished Racing Savannah, the next book in this series, and have every intention of jumping into Breathe, Annie, Breath, as soon as I schedule this post. I didn't intend to spend my weekend bingeing on this series, but I regret absolutely nothing. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Readergirl_Revus More than 1 year ago
I'm such a fan of Miranda Kenneally's books.  They are so true to life that you can picture yourself in them.  The characters are so real that you can imagine yourself having been friends with them.  I could so see myself hanging out with the people, doing the things that they do, and experiencing the same events and issues.  It probably doesn't hurt that the series is set in Nashville, TN, where I'm from, so it brings the books a certain immediacy for me, as I can imagine the settings, the weather, the places, and just the general atmosphere. Kate was a great character that really makes you think, as so many of this author's characters do.  She holds her beliefs very strongly, and it doesn't always make her popular with those around her.  This is someone who is incredibly devout in her faith, to the point where her church's doctrine kind of rules her.  Because of this religious aspect, there are probably going to be some people who might not like this book.  Some Christians are going to feel that the book was meant to portray Christianity in a negative way, as Kate's faith is very rigid.  Others are going to think the book was meant to portray it negatively from the other direction... that the book is somehow saying that if you don't live so Christian-like you'll be happier.  As a Christian myself, I saw it in yet another light.  Kate needed to find a good balance between honoring God and her faith, and realizing that doing so didn't mean enforcing heavy rules on yourself, that that's not what God wants for your life.   At first, the people around her don't like, seeing her as being judgmental and rigid, which is somewhat true in a way.  She has to grow out of that, and when she begins to, people start to realize they've misjudged her.  Of course, one of my favorite characters was Matt.  I loved him because he was so sweet, cute, and good, and he really saw Kate, saw her heart, when no one else did.   I loved that he was mature enough not to act like your typical teenage boy, even when he was doing things that were what a typical teenage boy would do.  He respected her beliefs, even as he sweetly coaxed her into opening up. This turned out to be one of my favorite Miranda Kenneally books, because I loved the gradual progression of romance, the growth of the characters, and the fact that the book had such a nice quality of self-discovery to it.  It just went a bit deeper. Kenneally definitely knows how to write realistic characters that make you love them.  I enjoyed the book from page one and it held me to the end.  
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really really liked it. It was a great read.
LittlePiecesofImagination More than 1 year ago
This series has been tough for me in the sense that I loved Catching Jordan so much. It suited me well at the time and I still adore it to pieces, but Stealing Parker, while still enjoyable, was not exactly my cup of tea. I liked it, but not as much as the first book. After hearing how people felt like Things I Can’t Forget was a tad preachy.. Idk. I was expecting to feel lukewarm about it, but guess what? I actually liked this one! “Learning is never a bad thing. And neither is changing your mind about things…It’s always good to reevaluate. To think and consider all sides.” I adore the fact that the guys in these books are all so sweet and Matt, Kate’s love interest, is no different. Plus, he plays the guitar. Who in the world can resist that? As for Kate, her growth from an extremely judgmental person to a young woman, who is not afraid to speak her mind and isn’t afraid to think on her own, was very humbling to watch. When she mildly told Megan off at the end of the book? I was so cheering for her!  It’s not that much about religion in my eyes (though it’s definitely about faith and god for Kate), but rather realizing that not everything is black and white, but there are lots of grey areas in life and sometimes you go against your beliefs because it feels right. It’s okay to doubt yourself; to have different opinions. This book tells us a story of stepping into adulthood, questioning things, mending friendships and finding love. It was quite inspirational if you think about it.  All of these books are very summerish—perfect for a warm summer night in my opinion. Also, I’m not religious at all, yet I didn’t find TICF preachy. In my opinion, Kate’s doubt, indecision etc carried over to other areas of our everyday lives. Also, I didn’t love Parker that much in her own book, but by the end of this one she had grown on me and I absolutely adored her relationship with Kate. Oh, and I also loved how this one was a tad darker and more upper YA than Miranda’s previous work.  All in all, Kate's story brought back so many memories of my own childhood and teenage years since I spent many summers at different camps. I found this book to be enjoyable and, with tons of character growth, quite inspirational. What I took away from this read is that sometimes there is no wrong or right, but it’s the thought that counts. I really liked the story in general and I’m even more excited now to read Racing Savannah. Brrrring it!  Overall rating: 4.1 out of 5.0 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved its so cute and it some parts of the story reminded me of my experience with someone. It was absolutley beautiful and the greatest book, its very tender and for romantic lovers. Although it did make me cry because of what i remembered but i recommend it to all readers fans of romance and action <3
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