Things That Float and Things That Don't

Things That Float and Things That Don't

5.0 1
by Anna Raff
     
 

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Why is it that a piece of metal doesn't float but a huge ship made of steel does? Here are answers to questions about density and flotation.

Overview

Why is it that a piece of metal doesn't float but a huge ship made of steel does? Here are answers to questions about density and flotation.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Adler shows his customary skill for explicating mathematical concepts in this smart exploration of floatation and density."-Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"This title supports the Common Core State Standards that focus on measurement skills, interpretation of data, and incorporation of key ideas and details in the text. Recommended for math collections in public and school libaries and classroom shelves."-School Library Journal

★"It's rare to find a picture book that uses simple, hands-on activities so successfully, leading young children to a fuller understanding of a scientific concept."
Booklist, Starred Review

Children's Literature - Phyllis Kennemer
A large boat weighing thousands of pounds and filled with a whole crowd of people floats, but a small pebble tossed from that boat sinks. Adler proceeds to explain this strange phenomenon. He does this with clear descriptions and suggested experiments describing density. He asks readers to fill a sink partway with water and drop things into it. A penny, a marble, and a toy car will sink. An empty pail, an apple, and a half full water bottle will float. A piece of aluminum foil formed into a loose ball floats, but when that loose ball is crushed into a tight ball, it sinks. Water is heavy, with a cubic foot weighing about sixty-two pounds. Things with a lower density, meaning things that weigh less than sixty-two pounds per cubic foot, will float. A lump of clay sinks, but that lump molded into the shape of a boat floats. The same is true for the steel used in making large boats. The density difference between clear water and salt water is also explained. The illustrations in this large format book feature a family and a dog participating in the various experiments and are an aid in understanding this complex topic. A good choice for curious youngsters. Reviewer: Phyllis Kennemer, Ph.D.; Ages 6 to 8.
Publishers Weekly
Adler shows his customary skill for explicating mathematical concepts in this smart exploration of floatation and density. Several experiments allow for a hands-on approach: Adler suggests filling a sink with water and testing whether different objects float, as well as using modeling clay to demonstrate how shape is as important a factor as density. Raff’s pastel palette and cheerful characters keep the mood light and pair well with Adler’s explanations, which are clear without being dauntingly technical. Along with Lynne Berry and Matthew Cordell’s What Floats in a Moat? (reviewed Apr. 29), readers will be well-prepared when it comes to displacement and density this fall. Ages 4–7. Author’s agent: Jodi Reamer, Writers House. (Sept.)
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—This introduction to density offers new vocabulary in bold font, delightful soft-hued illustrations, and clearly focused content on flotation. The strong examples provide extension activities that can be done at home or in the classroom. The images enhance the concept as readers meet a boy, a girl, and their dog as they embark on an adventure to discover what will float and what won't. For example, a spread depicting how density is relative to the size of the object shows the dog looking over a kitchen sink full of water as a piece of aluminum foil floats as a loose ball and sinks as a tight one. This title supports the Common Core State Standards that focus on measurement skills, interpretation of data, and incorporation of key ideas and details in the text. Recommended for math collections in public and school libraries and classroom shelves.—Melissa Smith, Royal Oak Public Library, MI
Kirkus Reviews
A boy, a girl and a dog demonstrate that things float in water when they are less dense than the water around them. Adler, who has demystified math for young readers for years in titles ranging from Roman Numerals (1977) to Millions, Billions, and Trillions (2013) turns his attention to physics with this simple but effective explanation of principles of flotation and density. His clear, logical text invites readers to experiment with different objects, to shape boats, and to make both ice and salt water mixtures. Raff's illustrations take this invitation further, showing a pair of children using toy boats, plastic bottles, pennies, aluminum foil, clay and ice to discover what things float and why. These digitally combined ink washes and drawings add interest and some humor, supporting and enriching the text, except on one page. There, a line showing the water level of a bottle to which salt has been added seems to show that the water level has risen though the author makes clear that the level should not change. Curiously, the series of experiments stops at that point rather than continuing with the denser salt water, as good teachers would encourage children to do. This appealing introduction can serve as a springboard for further investigations. (Informational picture book. 5-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780823431762
Publisher:
Holiday House, Inc.
Publication date:
07/01/2014
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
231,291
Product dimensions:
8.68(w) x 10.68(h) x 0.12(d)
Lexile:
AD600L (what's this?)
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Meet the Author

David A. Adler is the author of nearly 200 books for children. He was a New York City mathematics teacher for nine years before becoming inspired to write his first book. When his wife gave birth to their first child, David stayed home to take care of his son and to write, which he has been doing ever since. He lives in Queens, NY with his wife Renee.

Anna Raff is an award-winning illustrator of many children's books. She has an MFA from the School of Visual Arts and lives in New York City.

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Things That Float and Things That Don't 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Yvonne_M More than 1 year ago
As a science geek I love this book. It definitely is a book that upper elementary - freshman science teachers should incorporate into their unit on density. It does an amazing job of explaining many concepts (density, cubic foot, water displacement, and solutions). It actually walks readers though the scientific method in a fun and easy to understand way. I appreciate the data table and the accuracy of how data tables should be constructed (title, labels, straight lines, hypotheses). Finally the book sets readers up for many mini experiments to try on their own. This would be a great book to have for sharing because there are not many picture books that explain such a large science concept. I think it is important for upper elementary teachers and beyond to realize the role picture books can play in their teaching.